• Part 1: Choosing the problem

  • Part 2 : Define the problem more precisely

  • Part 3: Analytical Stage

  • Step 1.1: Determine the final goal of a solution

  • Step 1.2: Investigate a bypass approach Imagine that the problem in principle cannot be solved. What other, more general problem, can be solved to reach the required final result?

  • Step 1.3: Determine which problem, the original or the bypass makes the most sense to solve.

  • Step 1.4: Determine the required quantitative characteristics.

  • Step 1.5: Introduce time-correction into the quantitative characteristics.

  • Step 1.6: Define the requirements for the specific conditions in which the invention is going to function

  • Step 2.1: Define the problem more precisely utilizing patent information

  • Step 2.2: Use STC (Size Time Cost)

  • Step 2.3: Describe the conditions of the problem (without using special terms and without stating what exactly must be thought out, found or developed) in two phrases using the following format >

  • Step 2.4: Enter the elements of step 2.3.A into a table

  • Step 2.5: Choose from step 2.4.A the easiest element to change, redesign or tune

    Note:

    • If all elements in step 2.4.A are equal by degree of possible changes, begin with an immobile element (usually they are easier to change than mobile ones)
    • If there is an element in step 2.4.A that is connected with an undesirable effect (usually this is indicated in step 2.3.B), choose it only as the last resort
    • If the system has only the elements in step 2.4.B, take as an element the outside environment.
      Example: Choosing pipeline because valve is connected to the undesirable effect wearing
  • Step 3.1: Formulate the IFR (Ideal Final Result) using the following format:

  • Step 3.2: Draw 2 pictures (1) “Initial” (condition before IFR) and (2) “Ideal” (condition upon attaining IFR)

    Note: The pictures may be arbitrary as long as they reflect the essences of initial and ideal. The ideal picture must reflect the written formulation of the iFR

    Test of step 3.2: All elements stated in step 2.3.A must be in the picture, If the outside environment is chosen in Step 2.5, it must be shown in the “ideal” section of the picture.

  • Step 3.3: In the “Ideal” picture, find the element indicated in Step 3.1.A and highlight (by different color) that part which cannot perform the required function under the required conditions.

    Example: In our problem, the internal surface of the pipeline will be such a part.

  • Step 3.4: Why can this element (by itself) not perform the required action?
    Supplementary questions:

    1. What do we expect from the highlighted area of the object?
      Example: the internal surface of the pipe must, by itself, change its cross section in order to change the flow
    2. What prevents it from performing this action by itself?
      Example: It is immobile, therefore, it cannot seperate itself from the pipe’s wall
    3. What is the conflict between “a” and “b” above?
      Example: It must be immobile (as an element of the rigid pipe) and mobile (as a contractible and releasable element of the controller)
  • Step 3.5: Under what conditions can this part provide the required action? (what parameters should this part possess?)
    Note: Do not consider whether or not this is possible to realize at this time. Just name the characteristic and don’t be concerned about how it will be accomplished.
    Example: On the internal surface of the pipe a layer of some substance appears, bringing the internal surface closer to the axis of the pipe. When required, this layer disappears and the internal surface moves farther from the axis.

  • Step 3.6: What must be done so that this element (the internal surface of the pipe) attains the characteristic described in Step 3.5?
    Auxiliary points

    1. On your picture, indicate with arrows the forces that need to be applied to the highlighted part of the object in order to product the desired characteristic.
    2. How can these forces be developed? (Do not consider methods that contradict the conditions in Step 3.1.E)
      Example: On the internal surface of the pipe, particles of iron ore or water (ice) can be grown. There are no other substances inside the pipe. This will determine the choice.
  • 1.1.A: What is the technical goal/what characteristic of the object must be changed?

  • 1.1.B: What characteristic of the object obviously cannot be changed in the process of solving a problem?

  • 1.1.C: What is the economical goal of the solution/which expense will be reduced if the problem is solved?

  • 1.1.D: What is the roughly acceptable expense?

  • 1.1.E: What is the main technical/economical characteristic that must be improved?

  • 1.3.A: Compare the original problem with a tendency (a direction of evolution) within the given industry?

  • 1.3.B: Compare the original problem with a tendency (a direction of evolution) in a leading industry?

  • 1.3.C: Compare the bypass problem with a tendency (a direction of evolution) within the given industry?

  • 1.3.D: Compare the bypass problem with a tendency (a direction of evolution) in a leading industry?

  • 1.3.E: Compare the original problem with the bypass one. Choose which to pursue.

  • 1.6.A: Consider specific conditions for manufacturing the product: in particular the acceptable degree of complexity.

  • 1.6.B: Consider the scale of future applications

  • 2.1.A: How are problems close to the given one solved in other patents?

  • 2.1.C: How are opposite problems solved?

  • 2.2.A: Imagine changing the dimensions of an object from its given value to zero (S -> 0). Can this problem now be solved? If so how?

  • 2.2.B Imagine changing the dimensions of an object from its given value to infinity(S -> infinity). Can this problem now be solved? If so how?

  • 2.2.C: Imagine changing the time dimensions of the process (or speed of an object) from its given value to zero (T -> 0). Can this problem now be solved? If so how?

  • 2.2.D Imagine changing the time dimensions of the process (or speed of an object) from its given value to infinity(T -> infinity). Can this problem now be solved? If so how?

  • 2.2.E: Imagine changing the cost of an object or process - its acceptable expenses - from its given value to zero (C -> 0). Can this problem now be solved? If so how?

  • 2.2.F: Imagine changing the cost of an object or process - its acceptable expenses - from its given value to zero (C -> infinity). Can this problem now be solved? If so how?

  • 2.3.A: Given a system consisting of (describe the elements)
    Example: There is a pipeline with a valve

  • 2.3.B: Element (state element) under conditions (state conditions) produces undesirable effect (state effect)
    Example: Water with particles of iron ore is transported through this pipe. The particles of ore are wearing the valve.

    • 2.4.B Elements that can be changed, redesigned, or retuned (under the conditions of this problem)
      ** pipeline, valve
    • 2.4.B Elements that are difficult to change (under conditions of this problem)
      ** water, ore particles
  • 3.1.A: Select the element from step 2.5

  • 3.1.B: State its action

  • 3.1.C State how it performs this action (when answering this question, always use the words “by itself”)

  • 3.1.D: State when it performs this action

  • 3.1.E: State under what conditions (limitations, requirements, etc) it performs this action

    Example: (A) pipeline (B) changes its cross section (C) by itself (D) when flow control is required (E) without wearing

{"cards":[{"_id":"5c092f75e991e39348000015","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4601264,"position":1,"parentId":null,"content":"Part 1: Choosing the problem"},{"_id":"5c0932ace991e39348000018","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4601327,"position":1,"parentId":"5c092f75e991e39348000015","content":"Step 1.1: Determine the final goal of a solution"},{"_id":"5c0935a0e991e39348000019","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4601532,"position":1,"parentId":"5c0932ace991e39348000018","content":"1.1.A: What is the *technical * goal/what characteristic of the object must be changed?"},{"_id":"5c093a5de991e3934800001a","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4601553,"position":2,"parentId":"5c0932ace991e39348000018","content":"1.1.B: What *characteristic * of the object obviously cannot be changed in the process of solving a problem?"},{"_id":"5c093c1ae991e3934800001c","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4601570,"position":2.5,"parentId":"5c0932ace991e39348000018","content":"1.1.C: What is the *economical* goal of the solution/which expense will be reduced if the problem is solved?"},{"_id":"5c093db1e991e3934800001d","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4601581,"position":2.75,"parentId":"5c0932ace991e39348000018","content":"1.1.D: What is the roughly acceptable expense?"},{"_id":"5c093e7be991e3934800001e","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4601596,"position":2.875,"parentId":"5c0932ace991e39348000018","content":"1.1.E: What is the main technical/economical characteristic that must be improved?"},{"_id":"5c093bc6e991e3934800001b","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4601550,"position":3,"parentId":"5c0932ace991e39348000018","content":""},{"_id":"5c093ff4e991e3934800001f","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4601622,"position":2,"parentId":"5c092f75e991e39348000015","content":"Step 1.2: Investigate a *bypass approach* Imagine that the problem in principle cannot be solved. What other, more general problem, can be solved to reach the required final result?"},{"_id":"5c094250e991e39348000020","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4601637,"position":3,"parentId":"5c092f75e991e39348000015","content":"Step 1.3: Determine which problem, the original or the bypass makes the most sense to solve."},{"_id":"5c09439ce991e39348000021","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4601654,"position":1,"parentId":"5c094250e991e39348000020","content":"1.3.A: Compare the original problem with a tendency (a direction of evolution) within the given industry?"},{"_id":"5c094517e991e39348000022","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4601713,"position":2,"parentId":"5c094250e991e39348000020","content":"1.3.B: Compare the original problem with a tendency (a direction of evolution) in a leading industry? "},{"_id":"5c094719e991e39348000024","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4601697,"position":3,"parentId":"5c094250e991e39348000020","content":"1.3.C: Compare the bypass problem with a tendency (a direction of evolution) within the given industry?"},{"_id":"5c094837e991e39348000025","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4601720,"position":4,"parentId":"5c094250e991e39348000020","content":"1.3.D: Compare the bypass problem with a tendency (a direction of evolution) in a leading industry?"},{"_id":"5c094a5fe991e39348000026","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4601737,"position":5,"parentId":"5c094250e991e39348000020","content":"1.3.E: Compare the original problem with the bypass one. Choose which to pursue."},{"_id":"5c094bede991e39348000027","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4601783,"position":4,"parentId":"5c092f75e991e39348000015","content":"Step 1.4: Determine the required quantitative characteristics."},{"_id":"5c094f2de991e39348000028","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4601797,"position":5,"parentId":"5c092f75e991e39348000015","content":"Step 1.5: Introduce time-correction into the quantitative characteristics."},{"_id":"5c095033e991e39348000029","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4601826,"position":6,"parentId":"5c092f75e991e39348000015","content":"Step 1.6: Define the requirements for the specific conditions in which the invention is going to function\n"},{"_id":"5c096d39e991e3934800002a","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4602263,"position":1,"parentId":"5c095033e991e39348000029","content":"1.6.A: Consider specific conditions for manufacturing the product: in particular the acceptable degree of complexity."},{"_id":"5c09703be991e3934800002b","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4602273,"position":2,"parentId":"5c095033e991e39348000029","content":"1.6.B: Consider the scale of future applications"},{"_id":"5c093070e991e39348000016","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4601281,"position":2,"parentId":null,"content":"Part 2 : Define the problem more precisely"},{"_id":"5c097137e991e3934800002c","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4602302,"position":1,"parentId":"5c093070e991e39348000016","content":"Step 2.1: Define the problem more precisely utilizing patent information"},{"_id":"5c0973bee991e3934800002d","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4602313,"position":1,"parentId":"5c097137e991e3934800002c","content":"2.1.A: How are problems close to the given one solved in other patents?"},{"_id":"5c097564e991e3934800002f","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4602332,"position":3,"parentId":"5c097137e991e3934800002c","content":"2.1.C: How are opposite problems solved?"},{"_id":"5c097620e991e39348000030","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4602344,"position":2,"parentId":"5c093070e991e39348000016","content":"Step 2.2: Use STC (Size Time Cost) "},{"_id":"5c0976fce991e39348000031","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4602392,"position":1,"parentId":"5c097620e991e39348000030","content":"2.2.A: Imagine changing the dimensions of an object from its given value to zero (S -> 0). Can this problem now be solved? If so how?"},{"_id":"5c097b7be991e39348000032","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4602555,"position":2,"parentId":"5c097620e991e39348000030","content":"2.2.B Imagine changing the dimensions of an object from its given value to infinity(S -> infinity). Can this problem now be solved? If so how?"},{"_id":"5c097f3be991e39348000034","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4602549,"position":2.5,"parentId":"5c097620e991e39348000030","content":"2.2.C: Imagine changing the time dimensions of the process (or speed of an object) from its given value to zero (T -> 0). Can this problem now be solved? If so how?"},{"_id":"5c097ef4e991e39348000033","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4602584,"position":3,"parentId":"5c097620e991e39348000030","content":"2.2.D Imagine changing the time dimensions of the process (or speed of an object) from its given value to infinity(T -> infinity). Can this problem now be solved? If so how?\n"},{"_id":"5c0986dbe991e39348000035","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4602628,"position":4,"parentId":"5c097620e991e39348000030","content":"2.2.E: Imagine changing the cost of an object or process - its acceptable expenses - from its given value to zero (C -> 0). Can this problem now be solved? If so how?"},{"_id":"5c098a8fe991e39348000036","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4602625,"position":5,"parentId":"5c097620e991e39348000030","content":"2.2.F: Imagine changing the cost of an object or process - its acceptable expenses - from its given value to zero (C -> infinity). Can this problem now be solved? If so how?"},{"_id":"5c098fcae991e39348000037","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4602675,"position":3,"parentId":"5c093070e991e39348000016","content":"Step 2.3: Describe the conditions of the problem (without using special terms and without stating what exactly must be thought out, found or developed) in two phrases using the following format >"},{"_id":"5c09934ce991e39348000038","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4602700,"position":1,"parentId":"5c098fcae991e39348000037","content":"2.3.A: Given a system consisting of (describe the elements)\nExample: There is a pipeline with a valve"},{"_id":"5c0994cae991e39348000039","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4602733,"position":2,"parentId":"5c098fcae991e39348000037","content":"2.3.B: Element (state element) under conditions (state conditions) produces undesirable effect (state effect)\nExample: Water with particles of iron ore is transported through this pipe. The particles of ore are wearing the valve."},{"_id":"5c099851e991e3934800003a","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4603406,"position":4,"parentId":"5c093070e991e39348000016","content":"Step 2.4: Enter the elements of step 2.3.A into a table"},{"_id":"5c09a7d3e991e3934800003c","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4603426,"position":1,"parentId":"5c099851e991e3934800003a","content":"* 2.4.B Elements that can be changed, redesigned, or retuned (under the conditions of this problem)\n** pipeline, valve\n"},{"_id":"5c09a816e991e3934800003d","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4603421,"position":2,"parentId":"5c099851e991e3934800003a","content":"* 2.4.B Elements that are difficult to change (under conditions of this problem)\n** water, ore particles"},{"_id":"5c09a0d7e991e3934800003b","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4603587,"position":5,"parentId":"5c093070e991e39348000016","content":"Step 2.5: Choose from step 2.4.A the easiest element to change, redesign or tune\n\nNote: \n* If all elements in step 2.4.A are equal by degree of possible changes, begin with an immobile element (usually they are easier to change than mobile ones)\n* If there is an element in step 2.4.A that is connected with an undesirable effect (usually this is indicated in step 2.3.B), choose it only as the last resort\n* If the system has only the elements in step 2.4.B, take as an element the outside environment. \nExample: Choosing pipeline because valve is connected to the undesirable effect *wearing*"},{"_id":"5c093163e991e39348000017","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4601290,"position":3,"parentId":null,"content":"Part 3: Analytical Stage"},{"_id":"5c09b5d0e991e3934800003e","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4604425,"position":1,"parentId":"5c093163e991e39348000017","content":"Step 3.1: Formulate the IFR (Ideal Final Result) using the following format: "},{"_id":"5c09fe5ee991e39348000041","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4604434,"position":1,"parentId":"5c09b5d0e991e3934800003e","content":"3.1.A: Select the element from step 2.5"},{"_id":"5c09ff0ee991e39348000042","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4604441,"position":2,"parentId":"5c09b5d0e991e3934800003e","content":"3.1.B: State its action"},{"_id":"5c09ff74e991e39348000043","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4604458,"position":3,"parentId":"5c09b5d0e991e3934800003e","content":"3.1.C State how it performs this action (when answering this question, always use the words \"by itself\")"},{"_id":"5c0a00e1e991e39348000044","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4604465,"position":4,"parentId":"5c09b5d0e991e3934800003e","content":"3.1.D: State when it performs this action"},{"_id":"5c0a0175e991e39348000045","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4604529,"position":5,"parentId":"5c09b5d0e991e3934800003e","content":"3.1.E: State under what conditions (limitations, requirements, etc) it performs this action\n\nExample: (A) pipeline (B) changes its cross section (C) by itself (D) when flow control is required (E) without wearing"},{"_id":"5c0a06cee991e39348000048","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4605389,"position":2,"parentId":"5c093163e991e39348000017","content":"Step 3.2: Draw 2 pictures (1) \"Initial\" (condition before IFR) and (2) \"Ideal\" (condition upon attaining IFR)\n\nNote: The pictures may be arbitrary as long as they reflect the essences of initial and ideal. The ideal picture must reflect the written formulation of the iFR\n\nTest of step 3.2: All elements stated in step 2.3.A must be in the picture, If the outside environment is chosen in Step 2.5, it must be shown in the \"ideal\" section of the picture. "},{"_id":"5c0b0cb4e991e39348000049","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4605409,"position":3,"parentId":"5c093163e991e39348000017","content":"Step 3.3: In the \"Ideal\" picture, find the element indicated in Step 3.1.A and highlight (by different color) that part which cannot perform the required function under the required conditions. \n\nExample: In our problem, the internal surface of the pipeline will be such a part."},{"_id":"5c0b1646e991e3934800004a","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4605768,"position":4,"parentId":"5c093163e991e39348000017","content":"Step 3.4: Why can this element (by itself) not perform the required action?\n Supplementary questions:\n1. What do we expect from the highlighted area of the object?\nExample: the internal surface of the pipe must, by itself, change its cross section in order to change the flow\n2. What prevents it from performing this action by itself?\nExample: It is immobile, therefore, it cannot seperate itself from the pipe's wall\n3. What is the conflict between \"a\" and \"b\" above?\nExample: It must be immobile (as an element of the rigid pipe) and mobile (as a contractible and releasable element of the controller)"},{"_id":"5c0bafd1e991e3934800004b","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4605806,"position":5,"parentId":"5c093163e991e39348000017","content":"Step 3.5: Under what conditions can this part provide the required action? (what parameters should this part possess?)\nNote: Do not consider whether or not this is possible to realize at this time. Just name the characteristic and don't be concerned about how it will be accomplished.\nExample: On the internal surface of the pipe a layer of some substance appears, bringing the internal surface closer to the axis of the pipe. When required, this layer disappears and the internal surface moves farther from the axis.\n"},{"_id":"5c0bc2ebe991e3934800004c","treeId":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","seq":4605821,"position":6,"parentId":"5c093163e991e39348000017","content":"Step 3.6: What must be done so that this element (the internal surface of the pipe) attains the characteristic described in Step 3.5?\nAuxiliary points\n1. On your picture, indicate with arrows the forces that need to be applied to the highlighted part of the object in order to product the desired characteristic.\n2. How can these forces be developed? (Do not consider methods that contradict the conditions in Step 3.1.E)\nExample: On the internal surface of the pipe, particles of iron ore or water (ice) can be grown. There are no other substances inside the pipe. This will determine the choice.\n"}],"tree":{"_id":"5c092f37e991e39348000013","name":"ARIZ 71","publicUrl":"ariz-71"}}