• Yup, I don’t know whether these match a prompt, so for now, they live here

  • Background

    Some students have a background or story that is so central to their identity that they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story.

  • Failure

    Recount an incident or time when you experienced failure. How did it affect you, and what lessons did you learn?

  • Challenging Beliefs

    Reflect on a time when you challenged a belief or idea. What prompted you to act? Would you make the same decision again?

  • Environment

    Describe a place or environment where you are perfectly content. What do you do or experience there, and why is it meaningful to you?

  • Accomplishment

    Discuss an accomplishment or event, formal or informal, that marked your transition from childhood to adulthood within your culture, community, or family.

  • Please briefly elaborate on one of your extracurricular activities or work experiences that was particularly meaningful to you. (About 150 words)

  • Please tell us how you have spent the last two summers (or vacations between school years), including any jobs you have held. (About 150 words)

  • Your favorite book and its author:
    Your favorite movie:
    Your favorite website:
    Two adjectives your friends would use to describe you:
    Your favorite recording:
    Your favorite keepsake or memento:
    Your favorite source of inspiration:
    Your favorite word:
    Your favorite line from a movie or book and its title:

  • Supplemental Essays

  • Favorites

    (Optional) Share with us a few of your favorite books, poems, authors, films, plays, pieces of music, musicians, performers, paintings, artists, blogs, magazines, or newspapers. Feel free to touch on one, some, or all of the categories listed, or add a category of your own.

  • Why UChicago?

    How does the University of Chicago, as you know it now, satisfy your desire for a particular kind of learning, community, and future? Please address with some specificity your own wishes and how they relate to UChicago

  • Odd Numbers

    What’s so odd about odd numbers?

  • Untranslateable Words

    In French, there is no difference between “conscience” and “consciousness”. In Japanese, there is a word that specifically refers to the splittable wooden chopsticks you get at restaurants. The German word “fremdschämen” encapsulates the feeling you get when you’re embarrassed on behalf of someone else. All of these require explanation in order to properly communicate their meaning, and are, to varying degrees, untranslatable. Choose a word, tell us what it means, and then explain why it cannot (or should not) be translated from its original language.

  • Groups of Three

    Little pigs, french hens, a family of bears. Blind mice, musketeers, the Fates. Parts of an atom, laws of thought, a guideline for composition. Omne trium perfectum? Create your own group of threes, and describe why and how they fit together.

  • pH

    Were pH an expression of personality, what would be your pH and why? (Feel free to respond acidly! Do not be neutral, for that is base!)

  • Here

    A neon installation by the artist Jeppe Hein in UChicago’s Charles M. Harper Center asks this question for us: “Why are you here and not somewhere else?” (There are many potential values of “here”, but we already know you’re “here” to apply to the University of Chicago; pick any “here” besides that one).

  • Free Prompt

    In the spirit of adventurous inquiry, pose a question of your own. If your prompt is original and thoughtful, then you should have little trouble writing a great essay. Draw on your best qualities as a writer, thinker, visionary, social critic, sage, citizen of the world, or future citizen of the University of Chicago; take a little risk, and have fun.

  • Favorite Books

    Name your favorite books, authors, films, and/or artists. (50 word limit)

  • Newspapers

    What newspapers, magazines, and/or websites do you enjoy? (50 word limit)

  • World Problems

    What is the most significant challenge that society faces today? (50 word limit)

  • Summer Plans

    How did you spend your last two summers? (50 word limit)

  • Briefly elaborate on one of your extracurricular activities or work experiences. (150 word limit)

  • Favorite Events

    What were your favorite events (e.g., performances, exhibits, competitions, conferences, etc.) in recent years? (50 word limit)

  • Historical Moments

    What historical moment or event do you wish you could have witnessed? (50 word limit)

  • 5 Words

    What five words best describe you?

  • Intellectual Vitality

    Stanford students possess an intellectual vitality. Reflect on an idea or experience that has been important to your intellectual development. (100 to 250 words)

  • Note to Roommate

    Virtually all of Stanford’s undergraduates live on campus. Write a note to your future roommate that reveals something about you or that will help your roommate — and us — know you better. (100 to 250 words)

  • What Matters

    What matters to you, and why? (100 to 250 words)

  • Activities

    What three experiences or activities have helped you explore your desire to study and possibly pursue a career in STEM? (200 words max)

  • Books I’ve Read

    Please list three books, along with their authors, that have been particularly meaningful to you. For each book, please include a sentence explaining their influence upon you. Please note that your response is not limited to math, science or school-assigned texts.

  • Honor Code Essay

    Members of the Caltech community live, learn, and work within an Honor System with one simple guideline; ‘No member shall take unfair advantage of any other member of the Caltech community.’ While seemingly simple, questions of ethics, honesty and integrity are sometimes puzzling. Share a difficult situation that has challenged you. What was your response, and how did you arrive at a solution? (200 word max)

  • Fun and Pranking

    Caltech students have long been known for their quirky sense of humor, whether it be through planning creative pranks, building elaborate party sets, or even the year-long preparation that goes into our annual Ditch Day. Please describe an unusual way in which you have fun.

  • Diversity

    In an increasingly global and interdependent society, there is a need for diversity in thought, background, and experience in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. How do you see yourself contributing to the diversity of Caltech’s community? (200 word max)

  • Scientific Exploration

    Scientific exploration clearly excites you. Beyond our 3:1 student-to-faculty ratio and our intense focus on research opportunities, how do you believe Caltech will best fuel your intellectual curiosity and help you meet your goals? (500 word max)

  • February

  • Activities

    (40 Words Each)

  • Cultural Background

    Please tell us more about your cultural background and identity in the space below (100 word limit).

  • Research Supplement

  • Activities

    We know you lead a busy life, full of activities, many of which are required of you. Tell us about something you do for the pleasure of it. (*)(100 words or fewer)

  • Department

    Although you may not yet know what you want to major in, which department or program at MIT appeals to you and why? (*) (100 words or fewer)

  • Personality

    What attribute of your personality are you most proud of, and how has it impacted your life so far? This could be your creativity, effective leadership, sense of humor, integrity, or anything else you’d like to tell us about. (*) (200-250 words)

  • Describe the world you come from; for example, your family, clubs, school, community, city, or town. How has that world shaped your dreams and aspirations?(*) (200-250 words)

  • Tell us about the most significant challenge you’ve faced or something important that didn’t go according to plan. How did you manage the situation?(*) (200-250 words)

  • Who supervised the research? Provide names, titles, and affiliations for key people who supported the research. If you have personal ties to any of them (e.g. parent, relative, family friend), please indicate the nature of the relationship.
    500 chars

  • How did you get the idea for the research? Explain the development of your research design
    500 chars

  • What was the duration of the research? Explain the amount of time you spent on the research project that you have submitted.
    350 chars

  • What did I do?

  • What are your future aspirations in field of study and occupation? What would you like to be doing ten years from now?

  • Extracurriculars

    Please list the top 5 extracurricular activities in which you have been involved during your high school career and offer a brief explanation of your involvement including the duration and/or any leadership role (e.g. athletics, Boy Scouts or Girl Scouts, school publications, music, clubs and student government).*

  • Honors

    Academic, Extracurricular, Community

  • Layman Summary

    Summarize your project in layperson’s terms, while maintaining scientific accuracy. Your explanation should be easily understandable and include background, procedures, conclusions and relevance. The summary will aid readers, including evaluators, journalists and the public.

    750 chars

  • Inspiration

    What inspired you to conduct this research project?

    1000 chars

  • Interest in Science

    How has doing this research project helped you clarify your interest in science?

    1000 chars

  • Benefits of Research

    What benefits do you think your research will bring to the world? What additional steps, and by whom, might be needed for this benefit to be realized?

    1000 chars

  • Your Potential as a Scientist, Mathematician, or Engineer

    Address through specific and concrete examples what characteristics you have that best demonstrate your affinity and aptitude for being a good scientist. What have you done that illustrates scientific attitude, curiosity, inventiveness, initiative? How does your experience suggest future success as a scientist, mathematician or engineer?
    3000 chars

  • Major Scientific Question

    What is a major scientific question in your field whose answer you believe will have a significant impact on the world in the next 20 years, and why? Using examples from your own experience or research, explain how you might envision addressing the question over the next 20 years.
    3000 chars

  • Describe the world you come from — for example, your family, community or school — and tell us how your world has shaped your dreams and aspirations.

  • Tell us about a personal quality, talent, accomplishment, contribution or experience that is important to you. What about this quality or accomplishment makes you proud, and how does it relate to the person you are?

  • USC students are known to be involved. Briefly describe a non-academic pursuit (such as service to community or family, a club or sport, or work, etc.,) that best illustrates who you are, and why it is important to you. (250 word limit)

  • Describe your academic interests and how you plan to pursue them at USC. Please feel free to address your first- and second-choice major selections (250 word limit).

  • Describe yourself in three words.

  • Favorite food:
    Favorite fictional character:
    Greatest invention of all time:
    What do you like to do for fun?
    Role model:
    Favorite book:
    Best movie of all time:
    Favorite musical performer/band or composer:
    Dream job:

  • Some people categorize engineers as geeks or nerds. Are you a geek, nerd, or neither? Why? (250 word limit)

  • How do you plan to use your engineering degree to benefit society? (250 word limit)

  • What in particular about Yale has influenced your decision to apply?
    (100 Words)

  • What excites you intellectually, really? (250 Characters - 40 Words)

  • Think about a disappointment you have experienced. What was your response? (250 Char)

  • Suite-style living - four to six students sharing a set of rooms - may be an integral part of your Yale College experience. What would you contribute to the dynamic of your suite? (250 Char)

  • What do you wish you were better at being or doing? (250 Char)

  • In this essay, please reflect on something you would like us to know about you that we might not learn from the rest of your application, or on something about which you would like to say more. You may write about anything—from personal experiences or interests to intellectual pursuits. (Please answer in 500 words or less).

  • The Admissions Committee would like to learn why you are a good fit for your undergraduate school choice (College of Arts and Sciences, School of Nursing, The Wharton School, or Penn Engineering). Please tell us about specific academic, service, and/or research opportunities at the University of Pennsylvania that resonate with your background, interests, and goals. (400-650 words)

  • Engineering

    Tell us about an engineering idea you have, or about your interest in engineering. Describe how your ideas and interests may be realized by—and linked to—specific resources within the College of Engineering. Finally, explain what a Cornell Engineering education will enable you to accomplish. (Please limit your response to 650 words.)

  • You may wish to include an additional essay if you feel that the college application forms do not provide sufficient opportunity to convey important information about yourself or your accomplishments. You may write on a topic of your choice, or you may choose from one of the following topics:

    • Unusual circumstances in your life
    • Travel or living experiences in other countries
    • What you would want your future college roommate to know about you
    • An intellectual experience (course, project, book, discussion, paper, poetry, or research topic in engineering, mathematics, science or other modes of inquiry) that has meant the most to you
    • How you hope to use your college education
    • A list of books you have read during the past twelve months
  • Supplemental Essay

  • Robotics

    Robotics Essay

    “We’re two inches over?”. A shout permeates the shallow pre-competition peace that had settled into the room. People looked up from packing all our robotics hardware tools towards the center of commotion. A ruler on the side of our robot indicated that our robot was 20 inches long, above the 18 inch rule, with no room left to compress.

    We hold a little impromptu meeting to discuss this roadblock only 16 hours before competition started Saturday morning. The discussion is spaced with long breaks as the truth hits us: if we don’t completely re-engineer this robot by sunrise, we face disqualification.

    All of a sudden, the

  • Hiking

    “Wait, that’s it!” The distant rumbling of a mudslide snapped me out of my euphoria. “We should get a move on before the storm hits us”. The wind rustles the dirt, creating a whirlpool on the hill in front of us. Trudging up a hill that seems more like a vertical wall, I inch closer and closer to the peak of the mountain. With great effort, I clamber to the top. A glorious sunset greets me from the top of El Diablo, a brutal 6000 ft peak which took me four hours to summit.

    But my mind was on other things. For days, I had been stuck on an efficient algorithm to dynamically calculate the surface area of cells as they migrate from tumors, a key base of my project to model cancer angiogenesis. My previous methodology was iterative, and thus incredibly slow. To find a better way to address this issue, I looked through many books, scoured the internet, all to no avail, the provided algorithms giving only marginal increases in speed and efficiency.

    The solution struck me on the trek up Mount Diablo, sparked by a trickle of running water. If I simulated a rainfall on the cellular system, then I could measure the places where the water dissolves into the cell to find the surface area. By simulating rainfall, I could parallelize the task, and complete it much faster. I hurried home to code the new algorithm, and to my great relief, my simulation was faster than ever before. The project was up and running again!

    Hiking is my way of relaxing, giving me time to think about problems, and to allow me to explore the world around me.As strenuous and tolling on the body as hiking can get, it is an escape for me. All too caught up in the school world, surrounded by AP teachers who throw homework and stress upon students, hiking is as far away from that as I can get.

    I am at the crossroads of two worlds, nature and technology. From nature, I gather inspiration and awareness. The simplest thing like a water trickle or a sunflower turning towards the sun propels me to explore new questions and try new methods. Technology gives me the means of doing so. As an avid coder, I dabble in the arts of C++, Python, Java, and many more languages. My proficiency at coding and algorithm development have allowed me to apply my methods and ideas to real life Three of my science fair projects were inspired by nature, and I owe much of my current research project to these simple things I observe. Yet, at heart, I am a coder, developing complex solutions for the many problems that I tackle, not limited to high-frequency stock trading and breast cancer detection.

    I hope to use my computer acumen to further my future research in college and beyond. Yet, should I be stuck on a particular problem, I can follow a simple dirt trail to the heart of nature.Here, away from the stresses of society, I can relax, meditate on problems, and draw inspiration from the great world that we inhabit.

  • Minor Brainstorm

    -How I’m so tall in India

    -Set scene in Indiar

    -Talk about discomfort in India

    • Overall moral of the story — I feel tall in india

    “The doors are higher here in America”

    I realize what I am fighting for:

    I realize why I fight on: to raise the doors in India; to create opportunity so that we may continue

    Typical essay structure —

    Introduction to India

    Talk about Discomfort in India

    Talk about Where Family Came from

    Talk about What I have done/ Where I want to go.

    I am 6’1’’. In India, I am 5’6’’. Its not due to local fluctuations in gravity, but rather the . This is how I felt, crammed into a corner of the local Saraswati Express, heading for my dad’s hometown. The smells of local sweets filled my nose. “Sorry. Excuse Me”. Climbing over people and luggage, I make my way to Seat 55D, and plop my backpack down , ready to . Staring out the window

    I feel stares piercing into me; my fellow Bengali passengers looking at me as if I am some kind of alien. Truth is, in many ways, I am an alien. I am an American Born Confused Desi, born into the worlds of Indian and American tradition, but belonging to none.

  • (Basic Essay Outline)

    I started scientific research, but it never worked. I got really dejected, but in my lowest time, I chose to re-evaluate the situation, and found the solution.

    (End Outline)

    The Greeks had Nike. The Romans had Fortuna. Both were omniscient and omnipotent goddesses who, from their royal seats, blessed the lives of heroes, commoners, and the like. Yet, along with their culture and civilization, both were crushed under the test of time. Growing up reading the ancient myths, and later delving into the works of Homer, Euclid, and Aristotle, I had always assumed that my god of luck (if I even had one) would resemble those. It took me months of dejection to realize that my luck angel was just a

    I set off on my journey of research with a grand cause in mind: using cancer angiogenesis simulations to extrapolate the mechanisms through which cancer initially forms. With the help of my colleague

  • “Time to completion: 1000 minutes” At this point, the lines of code are probably burned into my brain. For the last 2 weeks, I’d been stuck on developing an optimized surface area algorithm, a major obstacle in the mathematical research on cancer modelling I’d been doing. In the peripherals of my vision, I see the red lights on my alarm clock reading 12:00. I want to keep searching for an algorithm that will put my research back on track, but my body succumbs to the sleep. My eyes doze off as my laptop whirs in the background, performing computations into the night.

    My life is research. Ever since 7th grade, I’ve been doing science fair projects, which eventually segued into scientific research. Over the last year, I’ve been engrossed in studying and mathematically modelling cancer proliferation. Evolving from a simple image project, into breast cancer detection, my project on cancer proliferation now focuses on cancer angiogenesis, the spread of blood vessels to feed the tumor. In order to track the cells in the environment, I had to log the surface areas of the cells, but my algorithm for doing so was very inefficient.

    It had started as a small problem. Initially, the problem seemed to be a simple case of optimizing the code and boosting performance, a fix that would have taken less than 30 minutes. However, tests showed us that the problems were manifested beyond inefficient code, and I would need to develop a new algorithm to tackle the problem. Over the next day, I threw my entire arsenal at it, all to no avail, giving only marginal benefits. For the next week, day and night, I read scientific journals to find how contemporary scientists dealt with the issue, but none properly worked with my situation. I rewrote my entire code in two different languages to optimize it further, all to no avail. I had mentally worn myself out, and the drive to continue slowly declined. I questioned myself, and almost quit on my projects. My productivity declined, and for a while, it seemed that I had hit an unsurmountable hill. Until a lego hit me in the head.

    The alarm clock didn’t wake me up that morning, it was my rambunctious cousin. Up since the crack of dawn, he was playing with whatever toys he could lay his hands on, all Legos. As the whirring of my laptop came back into focus, I notice my cousin counting his Lego blocks. Although trying to count the number of blocks, he was actually counting the number of sides. That’s when it hit me. If I modelled the cells as a collection of Legos, I could easily calculate the surface area of the cells. 10 minutes of furious coding later, I had finally come up with a usable version of the surface area algorithm.

    “Time to completion: 1.2 minutes”. Sharing a well-deserved ice-cream sandwich with my cousin that afternoon, I reflect back on the last two weeks that nearly derailed my research project. Although those two weeks seemed like a waste of time, in actuality, they helped me develop my knowledge of cancer angiogenesis and computer algorithms, and advanced me to a new stage in my research. My research will continue to throw curveballs at me that will be seemingly impossible, but I will struggle on. I might want to cease, but I will never quit. For now I know that on the other side of the hill of whatever problem my research throws at me, is a goal worth laboring for.

  • FD 2

    The shadowy evening quickly overwhelms the final traces of the shimmering dusk.Worn out from years of use, my back porch door creaks open. Leaving my stress at the door, I step into a new world. The pitch-black darkness surprises me, and the stars scattered around the night sky slowly come into focus. Surrounded by the beauty of nature, I snuggle into a plastic chair in the middle of my backyard, and meditate in solitude. Away from the constant stress of my academia, I reflect upon what I learned today and discover myself.

    At school, AP classes bombard me with endless lectures. On this battleground, abstruse details are fired at me like machine gun fire. Self-study methods I developed while pursuing college-level mathematics are overwhelmed by the volume of knowledge I must process every day. Finding the big picture is nigh impossible with PowerPoint lectures chockfull of details. Swamped by knowledge, the “breaks” between classes offer no relief from the onslaught. Here in my backyard though, I cope with my overflow of knowledge. Beneath the starry sky, I review what I was taught in the day, make connections, and truly learn.

    My backyard is my second classroom. Here, I am no longer the student, but rather the teacher. My plastic chair is my lectern. I lecture to the stars to review the material imparted to me during the day. In my imagination, my classroom isn’t a field of weeds, but a class packed with eager students. I use simple terms to explain the complex concepts in my lecture to heighten my understanding of the topic. Borrowing from teaching methods I learned through tutoring and advising science fair projects, I make connections between this new material and examples to develop understanding. Tonight, I shall demystify today’s convoluted AP Biology lecture on cellular biology.

    “Let’s talk about cellular interactions with its environment.” As I lecture, my speech instincts subconsciously kick in, with overemphasized hand gestures and voice modulation. The thunder of my voice echos around the neighborhood, when I emphasize important concepts like cell compartmentalization. My voice decreases to a dull roar as I detail its many aspects. I throw in tidbits from Science Bowl and scientific articles I read in my free time. My voice falters on topics I don’t understand, so I leave a mental post-it note to review it later. Using simple terms helps me whittle down topics to their essence, and increases my comprehension of the material. Surprisingly, I learn and understand the concepts better as a teacher.

    As night falls, neighborhood houses fade to darkness, and the crickets chirp a melody in unison. My lecture complete, I have finally learned everything taught to me today. Pausing for a minute, I absorb the beauty of the world around me before heading back to re-enter the real world. Now, my mind is focused, my stress feels tons lighter, and the gargantuan pile of homework seems easily manageable. I turn around to look outside my house one last time. The mist of darkness obscures the yard, but I still feel its presence, a symbol of my escape from society. Basking out there in the night, I journey for knowledge through self-reflection and discovery.

  • Final Draft

    The back porch door, worn out from years of use, slowly creaks open. The evening breeze fills the house, as the sun disappear below the horizon. I leave my stress at the door, and as I step into my backyard, I enter a whole new world. The pitch-black surprises me, but slowly the stars scattered around the night sky come into focus. Surrounded by the beauty of nature, I snuggle into the plastic chair in the middle of my backyard, and meditate in solitude. Away from the ever-present stress of my academia, I reflect upon all I learned today and discover myself.
    At school, AP classes bombard me with endless lectures and abstruse details are fired at me like machine gun fire. Self-study methods I developed while pursuing college-level mathematics are overwhelmed by the volume of knowledge I must process every day. Finding the big picture is nigh impossible with PowerPoint lectures chockfull of details. Swamped by knowledge, I find no relief from the onslaught in the 5 minute “breaks” between classes. Here in my backyard, though, I cope with this overflow of knowledge. Beneath the starry sky, I review what I “learned” in the day, make connections and truly learn.
    My backyard is my second classroom. Here, however, I am no longer the student, but rather the teacher. My plastic chair is my lectern. My lecture hall is surreally illuminated by the moon, casting a pale silvery glow on the rough concrete underneath my bare feet. I lecture to the stars to review the material imparted to me during the day. In my imagination, my classroom isn’t empty, but packed by a class of eager students. I use simple terms to explain the complex concepts in my lecture to heighten my understanding of the topic. Borrowing from teaching methods I learned through tutoring and advising science fair projects, I make connections between this new material and examples to develop understanding. Tonight, I must demystify today’s convoluted AP Biology lecture on cellular biology. Gathering my thoughts, I jump into the lecture.
    “Today, we’ll talk about cellular interactions with its environment.” As I lecture, my speech instincts subconsciously kick in, with overemphasized hand gestures and voice modulation. The thunder of my voice echos around the neighborhood, when I emphasize important concepts like cell compartmentalization, and my voice decreases to a dull roar as I detail cell compartmentalization’s many aspects. I throw in tidbits from Science Bowl and scientific articles I read in my free time. My voice falters on topics I don’t quite understand, and I leave a mental post-it note to review it later. Using simple terms helps me whittle down topics to their essence, and increases my comprehension of the material. Surprisingly, I learn and understand the concepts better as a teacher.
    Neighborhood houses fade to darkness, and the crickets chirp a melody in unison. My lecture complete, I have truly learned everything taught to me today. I pause for a minute, absorbing the beauty of the world around me before heading back home. I step across the porch door, and re-enter the real world. Now, my mind is focused, my stress feels tons lighter, and the gargantuan pile of homework seems easily manageable. I turn around to look outside my house one last time. The mist of darkness obscures the yard, but I still feel its presence, a symbol of my escape from society. Here, I journey for knowledge through self-reflection and discovery.

  • Final Draft

    The back porch door, worn out from years of use, slowly creaks open. As the sun disappear below the horizon, an evening breeze fills the house. I step into my backyard and enter a whole new world. The pitch-black surprises me, but slowly the stars come into focus. I snuggle into the plastic chair in the middle of my backyard. Away from the ever-present stress of my academia, I reflect upon all I learned today to discover myself.
    At school, abstruse details are fired at me like machine gun fire by AP classes who bombard me with endless lectures. The self-study methods I developed while pursuing college-level mathematics are overwhelmed by the volume of knowledge I must process every day. Finding the big picture is nigh impossible with PowerPoint lectures chockfull of details. Swamped by knowledge, I find no relief from the onslaught in the 5 minute “breaks” between classes. Here in my backyard, though, I cope with this overflow of knowledge. Beneath the starry sky, I review what I was taught in the day, make connections and find the bigger picture.
    My backyard is my second classroom. Here, however, I am no longer the student, but rather the teacher. My plastic chair is my lectern. The moon casts pale silvery glow on the rough concrete underneath my bare feet. I lecture to the stars to review the material imparted to me during the day. In my imagination, my classroom isn’t empty, but packed by a class of eager students. I use simple terms to explain the complex concepts in my lecture to heighten my understanding of the topic. Borrowing from teaching methods I learned through tutoring and advising science fair projects, I make connections between this new material to further develop my understanding. Tonight, I must demystify today’s convoluted AP Biology lecture on cellular biology. Gathering my thoughts, I jump into the lecture.
    “Today, we’ll talk about cellular interactions with its environment.” As I lecture, my speech instincts subconsciously kick in, with overemphasized hand gestures and voice modulation. The thunder of my voice echoes around the neighborhood, when I emphasize important concepts like cell compartmentalization, decreasing to a dull roar as I detail cell compartmentalization’s many aspects. I throw in tidbits from Science Bowl and scientific articles I read in my free time. My voice falters on topics I don’t quite understand, so I leave a mental post-it note to review it later. Using simple terms helps me whittle down topics to their essence, and increases my comprehension of the material. Surprisingly, I learn and understand the concepts better as a teacher.
    Neighborhood houses slowly fade to darkness. My lecture complete, I have truly learned everything taught to me today. I pause for a minute, absorbing the beauty of the world around me before heading back inside. I step across the porch door to re-enter the real world. Now, my mind is focused, my stress feels tons lighter, and the gargantuan pile of homework seems easily manageable. I turn around to look outside one last time. The mist of darkness obscures the yard, but I still feel its presence, a symbol of my escape from society. There, basking in the night, I journey for knowledge through self-reflection and discovery.

  • Rough Draft 2

    Creeeaaak. The back porch door, worn out from years of use, slowly opens. The night breeze fills the house, and the final rays of the sun disappear below the horizon. Darkness envelops my backyard, but the silhouette of my plastic chair is visible in the distance. As I step into my backyard, I leave my stress at the door, and enter a whole new world. The pitch-black night surprises me, but as my eyes acclimatize, the stars which litter the night sky come into focus. I snuggle into the tiny plastic chair in the middle of my backyard, surrounded by nature and in solitude. Away from my hectic life of academia, I reflect upon all I learned in the day, and truly discover.
    My academic life is one of chaos and franticity. My AP classes riddle me with endless lectures and abstruse details like machine gun fire. The self-study method I developed while pursuing college-level mathematics fails to keep pace with the volume of knowledge thrusted upon me. Learning is about finding the big picture, nigh impossible to do in powerpoint lectures plastered in details. The 5 minute “breaks” between classes offer no relief from the onslaught. I cope with this overflow of knowledge here in my backyard. In this peaceful environment, society’s pressure does not control me and I review what I “learned” in the day, make connections and truly learn.
    My plastic chair rocks back and forth on the pavement, tipped by a gentle breeze. My surroundings feel surreal (Show this to me), and in this realm I am the teacher, no longer a student. My nighttime lectures sitting in my plastic chair are verbal reviews of what I learn in the day. Pacing around and excessive hand gestures make me forget that I am indeed alone, and in my mind, I am teaching. college level material to a middle school class. My “students” know nothing about my lectures ,so I speak in simple terms to explain these complex concepts. Remembering the convoluted and length lecture in AP Biology this morning, and I resolve to better understand advanced cellular structure by the end of my lecture.
    “Today’s lecture is on cellular interations with its environment.” As I lecture, my speech instincts kick in and hand gestures are used without abandon. Subconsciously, I modulate my voice, loud when discussing important concepts like cell compartmentalization, and decreasing when describing its details. My voice falters in locations where I don’t have a solid understanding of the topic. Leaving a mental post-it note, I vow to review the topic later. My burden to teach in simple terms whittles down topics to their essence, and increases my comprehension of the material. Ironically, I learn and understand the concepts more as a teacher.
    Neighborhood house fade to darkness, and as the temperature drops, crickets begin to chirp a choral melody in unison. I pause for a minute, taking in the beauty of the world around me. My lecture complete, I have finally learned everything that was taught to me today. Walking back inside , I step back across my porch door, and re-enter the real world My mind is now in focus, my stress feels tons lighter, and the gargantuan pile of homework seems easily manageable. One last time, I turn around to my backyard. The mist of darkness obscures my surroundings, but I still feel its presence, a symbol of my escape from society. Surrounded by the darkness, I journey for knowledge through self-reflection and discovery. Some say it is darkest before dawn. Me? I dawn in the darkness.

  •     3 years of physics has taught that darkness is the absence of light rays. I've learned that reflections are caused by light bouncing off surfaces. Thus logically, you can't see reflections in the darkness. Yet surprisingly, my best self reflection comes in the cold dark night.
    
        The brisk wind hits me when I open the back porch door, as darkness begins to set in. When I step into my backyard, I leave the stressful and hectic society behind, and enter a whole new world. In school, I absorb an insane amount of knowledge that is impossible to process. My fast-paced AP classes bombard me with lecture after lecture. It is nigh impossible to make meaningful connections between what I learn and my previous knowledge in the 5 minute passing period "breaks" I am given. Here, however, I am free from all the stresses of  society. Free to deviate from the strict curriculum of school. Free to unleash my imagination on the topics I learn in school. As I recuperate in this environment of peace and solitude, I make connections and truly learn. 

    My plastic chair that rocks back and forth unevenly on the pavement, tipped by the breeze that caresses the night. This is my lectern, and in this realm I am the teacher. As a professor and teacher of the night, I verbally review the critical asNo one hears my teachings, but I can imagine that the stars light years away listen to me teach. What should I teach today? My mind leaps to the AP Biology chapter that we speedily skimmed through in class.

    Pacing around and excessive hand gestures make me forget that I am indeed alone, and in my imagination, I am lecturing to a class. My students don’t know anything about cellular structure, so I speak in simple terms to explain these complex concepts. Hydrolytic enzymes. Microfilaments and cell motility. Extracellular matrix. As I lecture, I realize that my understanding of extracellular matrix interactions with the cell isn’t very strong. Having to review in simple terms places a burden on me, but also Yet, after attempting to explain it, I find that I have actually found the explanation. I am not the student in this class, yet still I learn.

    As I wear out the topic of biology, my mind turns to robotics. Snuggling into my chair as the chill of the night creeps in, I brainstorm ideas to overcome the challenges we face in our VEX Robotics Competition.Today’s issue? The dreaded wall that separates our robot from the goal and victory. I let my imagination loose and welcome the many crazy nonsensical ideas. Design and hardware do not constrain me here: catapults, elevators, even spider legs come up in brainstorming. When I sit down with my engineering notebook, I’ll whittle down these ideas through an intensive design process to find the most successful plan for the robot. But here, melded into the darkness, I’ll focus on the essence of the idea. For robotics has taught me that the difference between Excellence and Decent, the difference between 1st and 2nd place is in the idea. The darkness which envelops me is endless, and as I embrace it, my creativity too becomes endless.

    I discuss my research: how my clash with cancer angiogenesis proceeds. My developments in mathematical modelling haven’t been the result of days of algorithm coding and equation solving, but these simple 30 minute sessions, when I sit back and think about my project so far. The tempting allure to impulsively code and follow where my code takes me doesn’t bother me here. I make decisions here, whether to.

    Some say that talking to myself is a waste, a Unix programmer piping output to /dev/null. Yet by presenting my ideas, I self-reflect. My sound waves will dissipate before a human being hears it, yet in the 30 minutes I teach ,I truly discover a lot. Le

    By now, the ambiance is darker,the stars glow brighter, and the crickets start chirping in unison. A minute passes, as I sit in silence, taking in the beauty of the natural world around me. As I walk back inside, I reflect on all that I reviewed, designed, and discussed in the half-hour outside. Inside awaits a stack of homework that my teachers will gobble up. Inside awaits the unpredictable rollercoaster ride of my research. Despite its stresses and worries, inside awaits the exciting life I hope to continue leading. Although short, my 30 minutes away from society allows me the downtime to self-reflect, make decisions, and discover. Some say it is darkest before dawn. Me? I dawn in the darkness.

  • 3 years of physics has told me that darkness is the absence of light rays in an environment. In the very same optics chapters, I’ve learned that reflections are caused by light bouncing off surfaces. Yet, I find it most surprising that I do my best self reflection in the dark.

    The time is 9:00, and my students are just filling in. “Good evening, class. I hope you all had a fine day. Today’s lesson is going to be on the various functions of the cell. But first let me take attendance”. I scan and see Sirius, Betelgeuse, and Polaris all shining brightly at me. In the corner, Aldebaran looks like he’s going to fall asleep.

    Throughout the day, teachers dump upon me an amount of knowledge that is near impossible to absorb in such a stressful environment. Now, however, I am ready to go back and tackle the information that was given to me.

    I settle back in this uneven plastic chair that rocks back and forth on the pavement, tipped by the gentle breeze that surrounds the night. All of a sudden, I am back in the classroom; this time, as the teacher. I take a moment to collect my thoughts and begin lecturing to the stars. Hydrolytic enzymes. Microfilaments and their effect on cell motility. As I teach biology to these giant balls of gas, I find the gaps in my own knowledge. My attempts to describe cellular movement fail, as I realize that my understanding of the extracellular matrix and interactions with the cell isn’t as strong as it ought to be. Yet, after attempting to explain it, I find that I have actually found the explanation. I am not the student in this class, yet still I learn.

    My class is quiet, but is attentive. I talk to them about my research, how my clash with cancer angiogenesis proceeds. My developments in mathematical modelling haven’t been the result of days of algorithm coding and equation solving, but these simple 30 minute sessions, when I sit back and think about my project so far. Even as I complain to Polaris about how my surface area algorithm for the cancer modelling is slow, I find new ways to make it faster. Orion’s Belt reminds me of Linkin Logs, a visual that allows me to tackle the algorithm in a whole new way.

    People often see my session with the stars much like a Unix programmer piping their output to /dev/null, as a fool’s folly. Yet behind all of it is a purpose. The stars might not receive my sound waves for 2 billion years, yet in that short 30 minutes I sit outside,I learn productively, discover different methods, and make new connections.

    By now, the ambiance is darker,the stars glow brighter, and the crickets have started chirping in unison. A quick glance at my watch tells me that my class has ended, and ceremoniously, I get up from my rickety lawn chair and make an exit from my lecture hall. As I make the journey, I think about the new algorithm that I’m going to code and the new journey that my research will take me. They say it is darkest before the dawn. For me, I find my dawn in the darkness.

  • 3 years of physics has told me that darkness is the absence of light rays in an environment. In the very same optics chapters, I’ve learned that reflections are caused by light bouncing off surfaces. Yet, I find it most surprising that I do my best self reflection in the dark.

    The time is 9:00, and my students are just filling in. “Good evening, class. I hope you all had a fine day. Today’s lesson is going to be on the various functions of the cell. But first let me take attendance”. I scan and see Sirius, Betelgeuse, and Polaris all shining brightly at me. In the corner, Aldebaran looks like he’s going to fall asleep.

    Throughout the day, teachers dump upon me an amount of knowledge that is near impossible to absorb in such a stressful environment. Now, however, I am ready to go back and tackle the information that was given to me.

    I settle back in this uneven plastic chair that rocks back and forth on the pavement, tipped by the gentle breeze that surrounds the night. All of a sudden, I am back in the classroom; this time, as the teacher. I take a moment to collect my thoughts and begin lecturing to the stars. Hydrolytic enzymes. Microfilaments and their effect on cell motility. As I teach biology to these giant balls of gas, I find the gaps in my own knowledge. My attempts to describe cellular movement fail, as I realize that my understanding of the extracellular matrix and interactions with the cell isn’t as strong as it ought to be. Yet, after attempting to explain it, I find that I have actually found the explanation. I am not the student in this class, yet still I learn.

    My class is quiet, but is attentive. I talk to them about my research, how my clash with cancer angiogenesis proceeds. My developments in mathematical modelling haven’t been the result of days of algorithm coding and equation solving, but these simple 30 minute sessions, when I sit back and think about my project so far. Even as I complain to Polaris about how my surface area algorithm for the cancer modelling is slow, I find new ways to make it faster. Orion’s Belt reminds me of Linkin Logs, a visual that allows me to tackle the algorithm in a whole new way.

    People often see my session with the stars much like a Unix programmer piping their output to /dev/null, as a fool’s folly. Yet behind all of it is a purpose. The stars might not receive my sound waves for 2 billion years, yet in that short 30 minutes I sit outside,I learn productively, discover different methods, and make new connections.

    By now, the ambiance is darker,the stars glow brighter, and the crickets have started chirping in unison. A quick glance at my watch tells me that my class has ended, and ceremoniously, I get up from my rickety lawn chair and make an exit from my lecture hall. As I make the journey, I think about the new algorithm that I’m going to code and the new journey that my research will take me. They say it is darkest before the dawn. For me, I find my dawn in the darkness.

  • Rough Draft 1

    I put down my near-empty water bottle to glance at my watch. Using one of the suit sleeves to wipe away my sweat, I quickly scan my surroundings. Trifold and poster boards line as far down the aisle as I can see. Across from me, a student seems to have developed a new engine technology. Next to me stands a student who mapped and discovered patterns in the human genome. Punctuating this scientific atmosphere is a man who charges down the aisle towards me with authority and a clipboard in his hand. State science fair judge incoming in 3.. 2.. 1.. Dispensing with all formalities, he begins the process “Tell me a little about your project”. Turning around to face my science fair board, I reminisce about the many months that went into this project, and I delve into my story.

    It started as a simple blob detection experiment in images. By the end, my project evolved into an intelligent breast cancer detection machine. I researched. I developed. I designed. I raced through pages and pages of code, doing computer science courses on Coursera and EdX, scouring for knowledge. As I tested various methods to predict cancer, confusion set in. Implementations of computer algorithms crowded my mind, each one as ineffective as the last. Much like Edison’s quest to find a lightbulb filament, I powered through different algorithms day and night. Despite my persistent attacks on the subject, my software was as good at predicting cancer as a coin flip. Finally, 4 endless weeks after my task began, the search ended. My bleary eyes couldn’t believe what I saw: an 80% detection rate. I tested the algorithm over and over again, and to my utter amazement, I had struck pay dirt.

    This and much more, I spill to the judge. Staring into the judge’s scrutinizing eyes, I discuss the inner workings of my cancer detection algorithm. The humble beginnings of my project. The nitty gritty science behind my software. The weeks I spent toiling away for my singular goal. The judge experiences my euphoria vicariously as I talk about the moment my success rate finally ballooned. I enthusiastically explain how my software allows for simple automated breast cancer diagnostics, eliminating the doctor from the equation. As the judge shakes my hand and walks away from my booth, the nervousness that had festered at the beginning of the day is replaced by a new feeling: pride.

    At the awards ceremony that night, I waited in anticipation for the prize that was sure to come. I had come to the state science fair with an expectation to win. Yet awards kept out being given out, but I never heard my name. On the way back from the competition,

    I couldn’t return with a first-place ribbon that day, but the California State Science Fair imbued me with a spirit of scientific discovery that lives on with me today.The lessons I learned from my judges helped me advance my project to a deeper level. The people I met remain a network of scientists that I talk with today. I will never forget my experience at the state science fair, for it has been my biggest influence as a researcher and as a scientist. To this day, I keep the souvenir pin on my suit. I don’t think I shall take it off. It means a lot to me.

  • A glint of silver flashes down my arm. My shako set and flute in hand, I march onto the turf. The stands loom in front of me, crowded with spectators and judges. The stadium lights illuminate me on this stage, and facing the packed bleachers, I realize this is my moment.

    No, this is our moment. I face my fellow marching band members. Brought together by a passion for music, these band geeks have helped me develop musically and socially over the last 3 years, and have become my family.

    I express my uniqueness through the conformity of marching band. We wear identical uniforms, we march with similar technique, we are literally one. Through my music, however, I surpass this conformity and channel my inner soul. Painting an illusion , I captivate the audience every step of the way. On the field, I make more than music. I make memories.

  • RD 2

    A glint of silver flashes down my arm. My shako set, I march onto the turf. The stands loom in front of me, crowded with spectators and judges. The stadium lights illuminate me on this stage. Facing the packed bleachers, I realize this is my moment.

    No, this is our moment. I face my fellow marching band members. Brought together by a passion for music, these band geeks have helped me develop musically and socially over the last 3 years. A bond forged by passion, they have become my family.

    I express my uniqueness through the conformity of marching band. We wear identical uniforms, we march with similar technique, and we are literally one. Through my music, however, I surpass this conformity and channel my soul. Painting an illusion , I captivate the audience every step of the way. On the field, I make more than music. I make memories.

  • A glint of silver flashes down my arm. With my shako set, I march onto the astroturf. The stands loom in front of me, crowded with spectators and judges. The stadium lights illuminate me on this stage, and facing the packed bleachers, I realize this is my moment.

    No, this is our moment. I face my fellow marching band members, brought together by a passion for music. A bond forged by countless hours toiling for one unified goal, they have become my family.

    We find uniqueness in conformity. We wear identical uniforms, we march with similar technique, we are unique individuals who have become one. Yet ,through our music, we break this conformity and channel our inner soul. We paint an illusion from the first melodious note to the final statement,captivating the audience every step of the way. On the field, we make more than music. We make memories.

  • Talk about Robotics

  • RD 2

    I had huge plans to follow my quirky pursuits over the summer. I was going to hike my neighborhood hills, build robotic t-shirt launchers,develop software applications,and whatever intellectually stimulated me. However, my highlight of the summer wasn’t on this bucket list though: fighting cancer.

    Come summer vacation, I was on the front line of cancer modelling research. Shocked by the misdiagnosis of my aunt’s cancer, I strove to understand cancer diagnosis. Through insightful studying and guidance from professionals, I independently developed a dynamical mathematical model to made unique discoveries regarding cancer criticality.

    New complications emerged at every turn, and fatigue and weariness often kicked in. However, the thrill of making a new discovery was unparalleled and I am now addicted. I have drunk from the pool of scientific research, and to this day, I continue my work, driven to rid Earth of the plague of cancer.

  • RD 1

    I never thought I would be fighting cancer. Come summer vacation, I was on the front line of cancer modelling research. Shocked by the misdiagnosis of my aunt’s cancer, I strove to understand cancer diagnosis. Over my summer break, I independently developed a dynamical mathematical model to made unique discoveries regarding cancer criticality.

    New complications emerged at every turn, as this deep level of research was littered with unknown and undiscovered concepts. After slaving away at the same problem for weeks, fatigue and weariness often kicked in. However, the thrill of making a new discovery was unparalleled and drove me to continue research.

    I have drunk from the pool of scientific research, and I am now addicted. To this day, I continue my work, driven to rid Earth of this plague.

  • This summer, I conducted my own independent research in the breast cancer field.

  • Your favorite book and its author: A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole
    Your favorite movie: Inception
    Your favorite website:
    Two adjectives your friends would use to describe you: Risktaking, Sarcastic
    Your favorite recording: When I’m running, Eminem’s Curtain Call. When I’m studying, Coldplay and the Fray.
    Your favorite keepsake or memento:
    Your favorite source of inspiration: Elon Musk
    Your favorite word:Panache
    Your favorite line from a movie or book and its title: “The greatest trick the devil ever pulled was convincing the world he didn’t exist. And like that… He was gone” The Usual Suspects

  • “Creativity is just connecting things. “ — Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson

    My cancer diagnosis research has hit a wall. A crucial surface area algorithm has bottlenecked my simulation, preventing any further development. For four weeks, I studied research articles, tested various algorithms, and tenaciously wrote code, all to no avail. My determination was flagging, and today appeared to be another fruitless search. Wiped out by a seemingly insurmountable obstacle, I discovered that the answer was right in front of my eyes, behind the research journals I’d been poring through. Using the beloved children’s toy bricks, I connected Legos to tumors to discover a new view of cancer criticality.

    My mathematical research was sparked by the false-positive diagnosis of my aunt’s cancer. Mentally and medically destroyed by a disease she didn’t possess, her misdiagnosis inspired me to pursue this field. Thirsting for knowledge, I studied several computational biology and data analysis courses on Coursera, EdX, and MIT OCW. Through my independent research, I developed a novel mathematical model of interactions between cardiovascular systems and tumors to diagnose cancer criticality. Undiscovered concepts and puzzling problems riddled my path of research. Although I persevered through most of the barriers, the calculation of cellular surface area had me stumped. My initial algorithm was incredibly slow, and developing new algorithms all led to the same inefficiency. Mathematical biology textbooks and research journals lay strewn on my desk, none with solutions. Having exhausted every resource available to me, I was back at square one. I began having doubts and my enthusiasm for my research dwindled.

    As it turned out, I was searching in the wrong place. My solution came as I built a Lego set with my toddler cousin. As she attempted to count the number of Legos in the tower, she mistakenly counted the number of sides. Laughing, I corrected her, when it hit me like a freight train. By visualizing a cancerous cell as a Lego structure, I could develop a new surface area algorithm. For the first time in weeks, I felt driven by purpose. Through the fog of my elation, I realized that I was no longer reading the book of science; I was writing it.

    My journey pursuing cancer diagnosis has shaped my life in many ways. Research gifted me a high level of knowledge about dynamical mathematical models, cancerous biochemical interactions, and computer-based analyses. The high-level problems taught me the importance of focus and whittled away my procrastination. Most of all, research gave me the gift of creativity: the ability to look at problems through unique paradigms. It still amazes me how a Lego, a simple childrens’ toy, could instigate a surface area algorithm. With Legos, I discovered a new perspective on cancer criticality, the research I submitted to the Intel STS and Siemens Research Competition, pending publication. With the help of Legos, my research has redefined the way I approach problems, and I seek small inspirations to tackle big problems. In research, school, and life, I encounter new obstacles more challenging than ever, but I conquer them with diligence, perseverance, and most importantly, panache.

  • “The world of reality has its bounds, the world of imagination is boundless”
    — Emile by Jean-Jacques Rosseau (Excerpted from AP European History Textbook)

  • Using a favorite quotation from an essay or book you have read in the last three years as a starting point, tell us about an event or experience that helped you define one of your values or changed how you approach the world. Please write the quotation, title and author at the beginning of your essay.

  • By applying to the University of Chicago, I broke one of life’s cardinal rules: don’t fall in love at first sight. First introduced to the school through a college representative, I was immediately hooked to the University. Coming home, I scoured the webs to learn more, and my enchantment quickly grew. I could spend pages and pages talking about the countless aspects of the University of Chicago that entrance me, but simply, I love all of it. I am a lock, and the University of Chicago is my key, ready to unlock my potential.
    Exploration has always been important to me, both academic and physical. As I began learning and discovering in my high school math classes (Calculus AB particularly), I stumbled upon the beauty of mathematical research. Coupled with my love of science fair projects, I pursued independent cancer diagnosis research, developing dynamical models of cancer interactions with the cardiovascular system. Knowledge was my drug, and I was addicted: relentlessly studying online courses on computational biology and poring through all the research articles I could get my hands on. I look forward to immersing myself into UChicago’s enormous variety of courses, whether for computational mathematics or my core classes. The core curriculum is a godsend for me, and I know I will enjoy studying Shakespeare, geography, ancient Greek philosopy, and whatever else Chicago throws at me.

    Even beyond academics, I love exploring my environment .My love of exploration has granted me the luxury of exploring many landscapes: busy urban cities, rural towns, and desolate and pristine natural wonders. So when I say that the University of Chicago takes my breath away, it means a lot to me. In many ways, U of C reminds me of Hogwarts: a Gothic feel, the house system, the magic of learning, and of course the Quidditch intramural teams. As Harry Potter did, I will enjoy and explore the nooks and crannies of the University. While at the University of Chicago, I hope to immerse myself in the vibrant culture of the Windy City, learning and discovering.

    At heart, I am a adventurer. Exploration and knowledge fuels me and draws me closer to the University of Chicago. Others may claim that Chicago is where “fun goes to die”, but I find myself vehemently disagreeing. To me, the pursuit of knowledge is the greatest enjoyment one can possibly experience. Whether it is the academics, the beautiful landscape, or the school’s philosopy, I find myself hopelessly in love. I see myself becoming one with the University of Chicago, thriving on my continual quest for knowledge.

  • It’s the most common horror story. You’re with a friend at a restaurant ,having devoured a volumptious meal. Picking at your teeth with toothpicks, you see a waiter with the bill. Through silent agreement, the two decide to split the cost. But when you open the bill, you realize the horror.

    $21! How are we going to split that? Like two duelers, you both take out your wallets, ready to avoid the awkward situation. You each put down $10, but the last dollar stares up at you.”I’ll cover the costs” “No, don’t bother. I’ll pay it for you”. “No, I insist. “ As you relentlessly argue over $1, you, like many people, begin to despise odd numbers and wish that they didn’t exist.

    Humans inherently despise odd numbers. A social species, Homo Sapiens love companionship and evenness, choosing to shun the “oddities”. The third tier of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs stipulates that humans love company and evenness, leading to marriage, social circles, book clubs, and other social structures. Our need for evenness is apparent from the youngest age, on the elementary school playground. Whether kickball, on the slides, hopscotch, everyone tended toward a group activity, their claim to evenness. Sift through these cliques, and you’ll stumble upon the “nerd”, quietly reading a book in the corner of the playground. Unique among the rest, he transcends the need for belonging and acceptance, seeming odd to us.

    As it happens, odd numbers are interspersed throughout society, not willing to fit into the groups of society. At work, you make awkward conversation with the one outcast coworker, the extra puzzle piece in the work environment. As you drive back The radio spouts negative opinions of the actions of rogue governments and dictatorships like North Korea. Even reclusive neighbors who never venture from home appear odd. The TV displays stories of social extremists, whose absurd actions and devoted beliefs casts them into the negative public eye. Society views odd numbers in a negative light and fights back against them for one reason: odd numbers are infinitely more powerful than even numbers.

    We fear the power of odd numbers, who through nonconformity, can successfully challenge society’s beliefs. All humans were once odd numbers, with their unique flair, but our desire for companionship drove us to become even. In comparison, odd numbers aren’t afraid to stand out. Tackling the world with a different paradigm, they don’t acquiesce to popular thought or opinion. Even when society beats them down, they stand back up, exhibiting courage and tenacity of beliefs. The greatest odd numbers were activists, whether for civil rights like Martin Luther King Jr, for freedom like Mahatma Gandhi, or for equality like Malala Yousafzai. These odd numbers are often drivers of social change, promoting their unique beliefs to significantly change society.

    Perhaps what makes odd numbers so odd is their ability to unlock our oddities. Bringing out little flairs of uniqueness, whether ideological beliefs, technological ideas, or creativity,odd numbers unleash social revolutions throughout society. As the tireless “odd” warriors fight against society’s standards for their own belief, these odd numbers finally change society’s standards and gain acceptance. In the struggle for these odd numbers to become even, they put their mark on history.

  • It’s a situation that we’ve all faced sometime in our lives. You’ve gone with your friend to a restaurant (strictly platonic), and now finished with that volumptious meal, picking at our teeth with toothpicks when the bill comes. On the outside, it looks fine. After all, we’re good friends, we can split it. But as you open the bill, you begin to realize the horror. $19? How are we going to split that? I must be not looking right. Nearby diners peer over their conversations, and with a simple head nod, give their regrets and sympathy for your situation. With a loud sigh and an elbow to their shoulder, you notify your friend to the situation, who immediately jumps up in surprise. Like two duelers, you both take out your wallets with cash, ready to pay and avoid the awkward situation. You each put down $9, and the last dollar left stares up at you.
    “I’ll cover the costs” “No, don’t bother. I’ll pay it for you”. “No, I insist. I’ll pay it” It’s these embarassing situations that give odd numbers their terrible reputation. Known for breaking friendships and who knows what else, most people wish odd numbers didn’t exist.
    But enough about

    They’re the odd one in the group.
    The downfall of the odd numbers has been one of significance in this world. At one time, odd numbers ruled the world. Ancient Mesopotamian architecture used to based on the pental system (5) , and when we used to count on our hands, it used to start with the number one. One was the first number imaginable, and thusly gained the wonderful reputation it did. We soon discovered the wonder of prime numbers and their mystique. I won

  • Q: You are a superhero with the most anti-climactic power ever. Describe your life fighting crime.

    “Note: What you are about to read may seem like a work of fiction, but it is very much true. No facts have been altered, and the gruesome details you will hear will… But I digress. I’ll let the story talk for itself” — Math Man

    Cancer is a complex and mysterious subject – while we know so much about it, we have yet to unlock all of its secrets. I intend to. My name is Math Man, and I will fight against cancer, using the powers of mathematics to understand how this plague works. I have an innate talent for mathematics, whether solving for the prime factorizations of numbers, calculating digits of pi, or finding derivatives and integrals. Some say that it is a “stupid”and “silly” superpower, and indeed it pales to the speed of Flash or the strength of Superman. On my playing field of cancer modeling research,however, I am nothing short of a god.
    For much time, my life had no aim. I knew I loved mathematics, and I developed knowledge of the minute details of the subject. I studied partial derivatives, Pascal numbers, and Monte Carlo methods. I expanded my understanding of my superpower, but I found no outlet. This all changed when my aunt was falsely diagnosed for cancer. Mentally and medically destroyed by the disease, her misdiagnosis stunned me, showing me the lack of our understanding of cancer diagnosis. At first I felt hopeless to stop this silent killer, but as I studied, I discovered the world of cancer modelling. Finally, my superpower could come to use. Enthralled, I set off on independent research, with the help of national cancer databases, professors in the field, and my background in dynamical mathematical models. Over the last two years, I developed a novel mathematical model of cancer angiogenesis, interactions between cardiovascular systems and tumors, to diagnose cancer criticality.
    Undiscovered concepts and puzzling problems riddled my path of research. Although I persevered through most of the barriers with my knowledge of applied calculus, one surface area algorithm in my cancer simulation had me stumped. My initial algorithm was incredibly slow, and developing new procedures all led to the same inefficiency. Mathematical biology textbooks and research journals lay strewn on my desk, none with solutions. I was back at square one and I began having doubts. Would this be Math-man’s final stand?
    As it turned out, I was searching in the wrong place. My solution came as I built a Lego set with my toddler cousin (yes even superheroes have family) . As she attempted to count the number of Legos in the set, she mistakenly counted the number of sides. Laughing, I corrected her, when it hit me like a freight train. By visualizing a cancerous cell as a Lego structure, I could develop a new surface area algorithm. For the first time in weeks, I felt driven by purpose. Through the fog of my elation, I realized that I found a chink in Cancer’s armor; I was the hero of the day.
    Research has shown me the true potential of my power. My cancer studies gifted me a high level of knowledge about dynamical mathematical models, cancerous biochemical interactions, and computer-based analyses. The high-level problems taught me the importance of focus and whittled away my procrastination. Most of all, research gave me the gift of creativity: the ability to look at problems through unique paradigms. It still amazes me how a Lego, a simple childrens’ toy, could instigate a surface area algorithm. With Legos, I discovered a new perspective on cancer criticality, the research I submitted to the Intel STS and Siemens Research Competition, pending publication. Cancer will continue throwing new obstacles at me more challenging than ever, but I shall conquer them with diligence, perseverance, and most importantly, mathematics.

    After all, I’m Math-man.

  • Books: Ender’s Game, A Confederacy of Dunces, American Born Chinese, The Great Gatsby, The Hobbit, Alcatraz versus the Evil Librarians, 1984, Brave New World,
    Movies: Godfather, The Lego Movie, Frozen, The Usual Suspects, Inception, Interstellar
    Singers: Eminem, Calvin Harris, The Fray, Coldplay, Queen, Taylor Swift

  • Reddit, Lifehacker, Android Authority, New York Times, San Francisco Chronicle, BBC, Wall Street Journal, Google News, XKCD, The Oatmeal.

  • Apathy. I really don’t feel like talking about it though.

  • A lack of understanding of current world events and apathy of them . I really don’t feel like talking about it though.

  • Over the summer, I pursued independent research modelling blood vessels near cancerous tissue to better understand . When not immersed in my cancer diagnosis research, I hiked my neighborhood hills, built robotic t-shirt launchers, and developed software applications, enjoying life under the warm California sun.

  • A glint of silver flashes down my arm. With my shako set, I march onto the astroturf. The stands loom in front of me, crowded with spectators and judges. The stadium lights illuminate me on this stage, and facing the packed bleachers, I realize this is my moment.

    No, this is our moment. I face my fellow marching band members, brought together by a passion for music. A bond forged by countless hours toiling for one unified goal, they have become my family.

    We find uniqueness in conformity. We wear identical uniforms, we march with similar technique, we are unique individuals who have become one. Yet ,through our music, we break this conformity and channel our inner soul. We paint an illusion from the first melodious note to the final statement,captivating the audience every step of the way. On the field, we make more than music. We make memories.

  • At VEX Robotics Competitions, I show off the mechanical beauty of our robots and face off in battle against the best bots in the Bay Area.

    At MUN conferences, through eloquent public speaking and skillful diplomacy, I tackle the world’s most pressing problems.

  • At VEX Robotics Competitions, I show off the mechanical beauty of our robots and viscerally face off against the best bots in the Bay Area. At MUN conferences, I am a politician at the highest stage possible: the United Nations. Through eloquent public speaking and skillful diplomacy, I tackle the world’s most pressing problems.

  • 2 particles travelling near the speed of light. One impact. In July 2012, the Large Hadron Collider proved the existence of the Higgs Boson.I wish I had been at CERN that day as we permeated space and time to discover the “God particle” that grants us mass.

  • 2 particles travelling near the speed of light. One impact. In July 2012, the Large Hadron Collider proved the existence of the Higgs Boson.Long theorized yet never proven, that day we permeated space and time itself to catch a glimpse at this “God particle”, revolutionizing physics as we knew it.

  • Daredevil, Dreamer, Quirky, Sunburnt, Elocuter

  • My cancer diagnosis research had hit a wall. A crucial surface area algorithm bottlenecked my cancer simulation, preventing any further development. My initial algorithm was incredibly slow, but developing and testing new algorithms all led to the same inefficiency. I scoured the Internet for my quandary, but found nothing. Mathematical biology textbooks and research journals lay strewn on my desk, all without solutions.Having exhausted all my resources, I was back at square one, spiraling toward failure.
    As it turns out, I was searching in the wrong place. My solution sparked as I built a Lego set with my toddler cousin. My interest piqued when she attempted to count the number of Legos in the set, but mistakenly counted the number of sides. Laughing, I corrected her, when it hit me like a freight train. By visualizing a cancerous cell as a composition of Lego-like structures, I could develop a new surface area algorithm.Through the fog of my elation, I realize that I am no longer reading the book of science; I am writing it.
    It amazes me how the simple children’s toy brick optimized my research, which I submitted to Intel STS and the Siemens Research Competition. Legos taught me to tackle my obstacles with panache and imagination by looking at issues through unique perspectives. Small observations help me defeat big problems, and I now keenly observe my surroundings, searching for the next inspiration to rock my world.

  • My cancer diagnosis research had hit a wall. A crucial surface area algorithm bottlenecked my cancer simulation, preventing any further development. My initial algorithm was incredibly slow, but developing and testing new algorithms all led to the same inefficiency. I scoured the Internet for my quandary, but found nothing. Mathematical biology textbooks and research journals lay strewn on my desk, all without solutions.Having exhausted all my resources, I was back at square one, spiraling toward failure.
    As it turns out, I was searching in the wrong place. My solution sparked as I built a Lego set with my toddler cousin. My interest piqued when she attempted to count the number of Legos in the set, but mistakenly counted the number of sides. Laughing, I corrected her, when it hit me like a freight train. By visualizing a cancerous cell as a composition of Lego-like structures, I could develop a new surface area algorithm.Through the fog of my elation, I realize that I am no longer reading the book of science; I am writing it.
    It amazes me how Legos, a simple children’s toy, helped me diagnose cancer criticality, research I submitted to Intel STS and the Siemens Research Competition, pending publication. Research taught me creativity: the ability to look at problems through unique perspectives. Legos taught me to tackle my obstacles with panache and imagination. Small inspirations help me defeat big problems, and I now keenly observe my surroundings, looking for the next thing to rock my world.

  • New Essay

    See MIT one
    My cancer diagnosis research has hit a wall. A crucial surface area algorithm has bottlenecked my cancer simulation, preventing any further development. Undiscovered concepts and puzzling problems riddled my cancer diagnosis research. Although I had managed to persevere through most of the barriers, the calculation of cellular surface area had me stumped. My initial algorithm was incredibly slow, requiring redesign. Developing and testing new algorithms all led to the same inefficiency. Mathematical biology textbooks and research journals lay strewn on my desk, all without solutions. Having exhausted every resource available to me, I was back at square one. My determination was flagging, and today was destined to be another fruitless search.
    My solution came as I built a Lego set with my toddler cousin. My interest piqued when she attempted to count the number of Legos in the tower, but mistakenly counted the number of sides. Laughing, I corrected her, when it hit me like a freight train. By visualizing a cancerous cell as a composition of Lego-like structures, I could develop a new surface area algorithm.Through the fog of my elation, I realize that I am no longer reading the book of science; I am writing it.

    Legos helped me overcome my major obstacle, and led to new discoveries on cancer criticality, researach that I submitted to Intel STS and the Siemens Research Competition. Research gave me the gift of creativity: the ability to look at problems through unique perspectives. It still amazes me how Legos, a simple childrens’ toy, helped me diagnose cancer criticality, research I submitted to Intel STS and the Siemens Research Competition, pending publication. I encounter new obstacles more challenging and confounding than ever, but I tackle them with panache.

    (517 words)

  • My cancer diagnosis research had hit a wall. A crucial surface area algorithm bottlenecked my cancer simulation, preventing any further development. My initial algorithm was incredibly slow, but developing and testing new algorithms all led to the same inefficiency. I scoured the Internet for my quandary, but found nothing. Mathematical biology textbooks and research journals lay strewn on my desk, all without solutions.Having exhausted all my resources, I was back at square one, spiraling toward failure.
    As it turns out, I was searching in the wrong place. My solution sparked as I built a Lego set with my toddler cousin. My interest piqued when she attempted to count the number of Legos in the set, but mistakenly counted the number of sides. Laughing, I corrected her, when it hit me like a freight train. By visualizing a cancerous cell as a composition of Lego-like structures, I could develop a new surface area algorithm.Through the fog of my elation, I realize that I am no longer reading the book of science; I am writing it.
    It amazes me how Legos, a simple children’s toy, helped me diagnose cancer criticality, research I submitted to Intel STS and the Siemens Research Competition, pending publication. Research taught me creativity: the ability to look at problems through unique perspectives. Legos taught me to tackle my obstacles with panache and imagination. Small inspirations help me defeat big problems, and I now keenly observe my surroundings, looking for the next thing to rock my world.

  • My cancer diagnosis research has hit a wall. A crucial surface area algorithm has bottlenecked my cancer simulation, preventing any further development.

    Undiscovered concepts and puzzling problems riddled my cancer diagnosis research. Although I had managed to persevere through most of the barriers, the calculation of cellular surface area had me stumped. My initial algorithm was incredibly slow, requiring redesign. Developing and testing new algorithms all led to the same inefficiency. Mathematical biology textbooks and research journals lay strewn on my desk, all without solutions. Having exhausted every resource available to me, I was back at square one. My determination was flagging, and today was destined to be another fruitless search.
    My solution came as I built a Lego set with my toddler cousin. My interest piqued when she attempted to count the number of Legos in the tower, but mistakenly counted the number of sides. Laughing, I corrected her, when it hit me like a freight train. By visualizing a cancerous cell as a composition of Lego-like structures, I could develop a new surface area algorithm.Through the fog of my elation, I realize that I am no longer reading the book of science; I am writing it.

    Research gave me the gift of creativity: the ability to look at problems through unique perspectives. It still amazes me how Legos, a simple childrens’ toy, helped me diagnose cancer criticality, research I submitted to Intel STS and the Siemens Research Competition, pending publication. I encounter new obstacles more challenging and confounding than ever, but I tackle them with panache.

  • Hey roomie!

    We’re going to be best buddies soon, so let me dive into the quirks that define me.
    I don’t limit my singing to the shower. Having learned classical music for many years, I melt into the rich Bengali culture of my family through singing. Although Indian and American music often clash, I love singing (offtune) to my favorite modern hits. Beware my tendencies to break into Eminem rap.
    I think best during the night, and I ponder many nights about my research or problems I encounter. If you ever see a dark shadow in the middle of the night lurking outside, don’t worry: it isn’t a vampire. It’s me.
    Tinkering, building, and soldering are second nature to me, and I’ve chased my passion through robotics and microelectronics. I apologize in advance for the dismantled gadgets around our room.
    Don’t expect me inside often. When stressed, I pick up my cleats and dive into a soccer game. Breathing in the fresh air, I immerse myself in the serene world around me, and truly live.
    I am a ball of pure energy, and I live with utmost optimism and enthusiasm.I must warn you, it is contagious. Over the next four years, you’ll hear some of the best and corniest jokes in my arsenal. To me, the world is a glass completely full, bursting with opportunity.
    Oh, but I’ve babbled on for too long now! Tell me about yourself!

  • A person is the sum of his or her peculiarities. Since we’re going to be best buddies for the next few years, let me introduce to some of the quirks that define me.
    I don’t limit my singing to the shower. Having learned classical music for many years, I melt into the rich Bengali culture of my family through singing. Although Indian and American music often clash, I love singing (offtune) to my favorite modern hits. Beware my tendencies to break into Eminem rap.
    I think best during the night, and I ponder many nights about my research or problems I encounter. If you ever see a dark shadow in the middle of the night lurking outside, don’t worry: it isn’t a vampire. It’s me.
    I am a ball of pure energy, and I live with utmost enthusiasm and energy.I must warn you, it is contagious. Over the next four years, you’ll hear some of the best and corniest jokes in my arsenal. It’s my optimism: to me, the world is a glass completely full.
    Tinkering, building, and soldering are second nature to me. I’ve chased my passion with robots and microelectronics, but it isn’t just a hobby; it’s a learning perspective. By understanding the functions of the specific parts, I piece together and fully understand how these machines work.
    Oh, but I’ve babbled on for too long now! Tell me about yourself!

  • Many say that a person is the sum of his or her peculiarities. If that’s so , my sum is really high. Since we’re going to be best buddies for the next couple of years, it’s only fair if I tell you a little about myself.
    I think best during the night. Many a night I spend pondering my research problems or whatever is floating across my mind. If you ever wake up in the middle of the night, and see a shadow pondering the complex mysteries of our world, don’t worry: it’s me.
    My body is a natural source of caffeine: I am always pumped up and full of energy. Whatever task I perform, I tackle with utmost enthusiasm and energy. I don’t know whether it comes from my breakfast cereal ( strictly Honey Bunches of Oats) or just the environment, but I must warn you, it is contagious.
    I tell the corniest jokes in the world. If my passion for mathematics and computer science doesn’t pan out, I’m sure to be a comedian. Over the next four years, you’ll hear some of my great jokes and some not so great. It all stems in my optimism: I look at the world like a glass completely full, not a glass half empty.
    I make it a habit to wear multiple layers. For a tropical Bay Area dweller like me, any weather but sunny is bad weather, and I have a fear of the cold . I fight back against my frigophobia, and whenever the temperature drops below 50 degrees Farenheit, I’m all suited up, big jacket, warm sweatpants, ready to withstand the weather.
    But enough about me; tell me about yourself!

  • I’m sorry if you don’t see me around the dorms a lot. You see, I am a spy. Not CIA, MI6, or KGB, but a hobbyist spy. In my free time, I code to encode. Having learnt from classics like Caesar’s cipher and current powerhouses like RSA, I love creating and cracking unbreakable ciphers.

    My journey as a spy began with simple invisible messages with lemon juice and invisible marker as a kid. Enthrilled by leaving secrets in plain secrets, I have continued my passions, especially in computer cryptography. Once, irritated because my online storage provider only allowed images not documents, I encoded text into pictures. By manipulating random pixels, I scattered the letters into an image. With this technology, I brought a new meaning to “a picture is worth a thousand words”.

    Cryptography drives me to decipher patterns in the data hidden right in front of my eyes. The thrill of leaving secrets in plain sight never fails to satiate me. If the paranoia that the internet will steal your data infects you, I’m always here. I’ll turn your message into a random series of characters which seemingly mean nothing, but to the right pair of eyes, tells a story.

    P.S. This message will self-destruct in 10 seconds…

  • Random Musings
    I love cereal. Although I am accepting of all kinds of cereal, Honey Bunches of Oats is my personal favorite

    When I do eat cereal, I pour cereal onto my milk, and not milk onto my cereal.

  • RD 3

    I remember the day the man fell from the sky. Eyes glued to the live stream, I watched Felix Bumgartener freefall 128,000 feet from space. As his feet touched the earth, I was branded with the importance of daring to go further. Deep inside me bubbles a desire to explore and discover, fueling my inner curiosity. Exploration keeps me invigorated and it intellectually stimulates me. Whether in research, class, or extracurriculars, I express my most vital trait: an insatiable love of exploration.

    Whether accidentally making chlorine gas by running electricity through salt water in AP Chemistry or exploding light bulbs by changing the inner environment in AP Physics, my curiosity and ventures in science classes haven’t always turned out well. However through these gaffes, I discovered the power of electrolysis and conductive gases. Although creating poisonous gases doesn’t get on the teacher’s good side, I surpassed the structure of school and learned something new.

    Through my cancer research, I’ve explored the world around me with intellect and scientific prowess and my love of exploration now drives me to Stanford. I will thrive here, engorging in the diverse atmosphere, classes and research opportunities, but my journey won’t end there. Throughout graduate studies and beyond, I hope to continue discovering in the field of mathematics and computer science. For in the end, exploration, is and will be,the only thing that matters to me.

  • RD 2

    I remember the day the man fell from the sky. Spellbound by the live stream, I watched Felix Bumgartener fall 128,000 feet from space. As his feet touched the earth, Bumgartener’s jump reminded me of the importance of daring to go further. Deep inside me is a desire to explore and discover, a quirk that pops out in the many things I do.Exploration keeps me invigorated, it intellectually stimulates me, and it appeases my sense of discovery.

    The first step can often be the hardest, and can often backfire. I’ve attempted to explore throughout my science classes, but my ventures haven’t always turned out well, whether accidentally making chlorine gas by running electricity through salt water or exploding light bulbs by changing the inner environment. Behind the gaffes, I discovered the power of electrolysis and conductive gasses. What seemed like

    I believe in letting curiousity and discovery control my actions. Through extracurriculars and research, I’ve explored the world around me with intellect and scientific prowess in mind. My love of exploration now drives me to Stanford. I will thrive here, engorging in the diverse atmosphere, classes and research opportunities. But my journey won’t end there. Throughout graduate studies and beyond, I hope to continue discovering in the field of mathematics and computer science. For in the end, exploration, is and will be,the only thing that matters to me.

  • I remember the day the man fell from the sky. My eyes rapt on the live stream, I watched Felix Bumgartener dive 128,000 feet from space. As his feet touched the earth, the world erupted in applause, and mankind advanced to a new level in space exploration. Possibly the moon landing of my generation, Bumgartener’s jump reminded me of the importance of daring to go further. Deep inside me is a desire to explore further, to learn more, to go deeper, a passion that I’ve expressed and continue to express.
    The first step can often be the hardest. Oftentimes it backfires on you or leads to a dead end. I’ve attempted to explore and learn throughout my high school science courses, not all to the same avail. Whether accidentally making chlorine gas while electrolyzing water (it was salt water) or exploding light bulbs by changing the inner environment, my scientific ventures haven’t always turned out well. Despite the initial embarrassment, I ended up realizing the positive side effects of my discoveries and whatever.

    We follow Moore’s Law to an extent. Although I’m not stipulating that we’re computers and completely logical (we’re not), the fact remains that . It is my goal, nay mission, to keep on exploring. As I’ve done through high school, whether through extracurriculars or research, I’ve striven to explore the world around me as intellectually as possible. Exploration keeps me invigorated, it intellectually stimulates me, and it appeases my sense of discovery. My love of exploration now drives me to Stanford, and I hope to thrive here, continually discovering. I will engorge in the variety of classes at Stanford and research opportunities. But my journey won’t end there. I hope to continue researching, discovering new things in the field of mathematics and computer science never ever imagined before. In the end, to me, exploration is and will be the only thing that matters.

  • See USC (What do you want to study; MIT What do you want to Study)

  • Final Draft

    Armed with buzzers, we tackle science trivia questions from DNA replication to quantum states in stars. This is Science Bowl, a true test of one’s scientific acumen. For every question that stumps me, I take the unknown fact, and file it into my bank of knowledge. Through this repeated pattern of learning, I expand the breadth of my understanding of science.
    I explore the ins and outs of science through research. Delving into the deep dark unknowns of science, I discover and learn . Over the past 6 years, my science fair projects have evolved from physical hardware projects on desalination and sprinkler optimization to researching theoretical mathematical projects like data compression and cancer detection. Currently, I am developing mathematical models of cancer angiogenesis, the effect of cancer on the surrounding blood vessels.

    In robotics, I unleash my creativity, creating contraptions that perform my bidding. In my hands, gears, wheels and metal pieces magically come together to form robots. My code breathes life into the robot, and it perks up, spinning around in circles and driving across the floor. Robotics stretches my imagination, and the unlimited potential fuels my spirit of discovery.

  • RD 1

    Armed with buzzers, we tackle science trivia questions from quantum mechanics to solar flares. “Physics, Multiple Choice” The question deals with positron emission, and remembering the radiation emission rule, I buzz in. “Incorrect”.I learn about the exception to the rule, and file it into my bank of knowledge. Through Science Bowl, I gain an innate knowledge of science.

    As a scientific researcher, I discover the exceptions and delve into the unknowns of science. Over the last 6 years, I have participated in science fairs, advancing from small hardware projects like desalination and sprinkler optimization to full research projects. Currently, I pursue cancer proliferation, and  mathematically model how angiogenesis affects the development of a tumor.

    In robotics, I find an outlet for creativity. I am a god, and with the building blocks, I create contraptions to perform my bidding. I manipulate objects through just a combination of gears, wheels and metal pieces. Unlike theoretical programming in my research, my code yields practical results. In the VEX competition, I am driven to discover. Outside of robotics, this spirit of discovery drives me in my mathematical research.

  • 1984 by George Orwell

    As the Brotherhood fights against thoughtcrime, I am inspired to think critically and reflect.

    Freakonomics by Steven Levitt

    A collection of interesting statistical trends, this book revealed the power of statistics to me.

    Mathematical Biology: An Introduction by J.D. Murray

    This textbook piqued my interest in cancer modelling and laid the foundation for my research.

  • Possible Books

    1984

    The Brotherhood fighting against thoughtcrime drives me to think critically and reflect.

    Freakonomics

    A collection of trends in major problems discerned from simple data helped me understand the power of statistics

    Brave New World —

    Mathematical Biology: An Introduction

    This college textbook helped me lay the foundation for my research project in cancer modelling

  • Final Draft

    Ten kids stare at me, eagerly awaiting for the first question. “Welcome to the final elimination round”. The last step in my quest to create a competitive Science Bowl team, I will select the top 4 to move on to the regional competition with me.

    Beginning the competition with a physics question, I barely have time to read it before Arjun buzzes in with the right answer. He buzzes in again correctly as I ask the next two questions. Arjun, with his expansive knowledge of physics, is heavily favored to advance, and the early questions have proved this. As the competition continues, almost all the points go to Arjun, and a suspicion creeps into my head. My worst fears are confirmed when I find the answers loaded on his iPhone.

    Stuck with a choice between a more competitive team and my moral code, I resist my desire for a stronger team, and remove Arjun from the competition. Although one of the strongest competitors, he broke the unity of the team by cheating. We may be academically weaker now, but by promoting trust and cooperation over immoral performance, I know I have made the right choice.

  • RD 1

    Ten kids stared at me, hands on buzzers, waiting for the first question. “Welcome to the final elimination round”. In my quest to create an elite team for Science Bowl, I recruited and coached students versed in all scientific disciples. Yet only 4 of the 10 competing would move on to the regional competition.

    “Physics, Short Answer”. I had just finished asking the question, when my close friend and aspiring competitor buzzed in. “Weak Force” “Correct”. I had not finished reading the second question when John buzzed in, again with the correct answer. “Are you guys even trying?”, I joked. A suspicion creeped in when my friend answered the third question correctly. Then the fourth and fifth. My worst suspicions were confirmed when I saw an iPhone cleverly hidden in his hands.

    Perhaps one of the hardest decisions I have ever made, I effectively sacrificed our friendship by eliminating him from the running. John would easily have qualified , yet his choice to cheat broke my trust, and severely weakened our friendship. Our team has yet to compete, yet I am sure that I have made the right choice, by promoting team trust and cooperation over a need to immorally overperform.

  • Final Draft

    I am a spy. Not CIA, MI6, or KGB, but a hobbyist spy. When I’m not caught up in my academic life, I code to encode. Learning from classics like Caesar’s cipher and current powerhouses like RSA, I strive to create the next unbreakable cipher from the ground up .

    Unlike lemon juice and invisible marker I used as a kid spy, I have learned new software techniques to hide messages. Once, irritated because my online storage provider only allowed images not documents, I encoded text into pictures. By manipulating random pixels, I cleverly scattered the letters around the image. With this technology, I brought a new meaning to “a picture is worth a thousand words”.

    Encryption is more than a hobby to me. Cryptography drives me to decipher patterns in the data hidden right in front of my eyes. The thrill of leaving secrets in plain sight never fails to satiate me. I’ll turn a message into a random series of characters which seemingly mean nothing. To the right pair of eyes,however, they tell a story.

  • RD 2

    I am a spy. Not CIA, MI6, or KGB, but a hobbyist spy. When I’m not caught up in my academic life, I code to encode. Learning from classics like Caesar’s cipher and current powerhouses like RSA, I strive to create the next unbreakable cipher from the ground up .

    Unlike my previous life as a kid spy, I have learned techniques other than lemon juice or invisible marker to hide messages. Once, irritated because my online storage provider only allowed images not documents, I encoded text into pictures. By manipulating random pixels, I cleverly scattered the letters around the image. With this technology, I bring a new meaning to “a picture is worth a thousand words”.

    Encryption is more than a hobby to me. Cryptography drives me to decipher patterns in the data hidden right in front of our eyes. The thrill of leaving secrets in plain sight never fails to satiate me. I’ll turn a message into a seemingly random series of characters. To the passerby, they mean nothing. To the right pair of eyes, they tell a story.

  • RD 1

    I am a spy. Not CIA, MI6, KGB, but a hobbyist spy. When I’m not busy solving differential equations or modelling cancer angiogenesis, I code to encode. From classics like Caesar’s cipher to current powerhouses like RSA to military level Blowfish algorithms, name an encryption algorithm, its probably in my arsenal.

    Perhaps my favorite form of cryptography is through images. Unlike in the novel The Da Vinci Code, which sparked my interest in encryption, you don’t have to write with invisible marker on famous paintings to send messages. I developed a method of hiding messages through random pixel manipulation in images. Through these methods, I once hid the entire text of Les Miserables in just the cover art.

    For me, cryptography is more than a hobby, it’s my method of finding patterns in the world, and trying to figure out what data is hidden right in front of our eyes, yet we fail to recognize. The thrill of hiding secrets in plain sight never fails to satiate me. Give me a message, and I’ll give you a series of random characters that mean nothing, but to the right pair of eyes, tells a story.

    200 words

  • Final Draft

    My face drops as I see the projects competing against us in the science fair. Standing next to these complex engineering projects, my sun-tracking solar panel feels unsophisticated and unlikely to win. I still hold a trump card though: the verbal presentation. I overcome the obstacles I face in STEM fields through the unique pathway of public speaking.

    The judge approaches, and I dive into the presentation. My passion for the topic bleeds into my speech. I enthusiastically describe the scientific concepts like parallax and bio-mimicry that reveal the intense research underlying my project. Self-reflecting on the experiment, I address flaws in my data-collecting procedures and discuss possible solutions. By connecting my discoveries with real-world applications, I relate the data to my goals and conclude my presentation.

    The judge walks away with a smile on his face, and I realize that my speech has successfully captivated him, elevating me to the 1st place medal. I marvel at the power of speech and its ability to persuade. Effective communication is my secret weapon and public speaking is my mindset. These two unique aspects pave the path I walk today.

  • RD 3

    My face drops as I see the projects competing against us in the science fair. Standing next to these complex engineering projects, my sun-tracking solar panel feels unsophisticated and unlikely to win. Yet,I still hold a trump card: the judged verbal presentation. As a student of speech, I overcome the obstacles I face in STEM through the unique pathway of public speaking, .

    The judge approaches, and I dive into the presentation. My passion for the topic bleeds into my speech. I enthusiastically describe the scientific concepts like parallax and biomimicry that underlie our project, revealing the intense research undertaken. Self-reflecting on the experiment, I address flaws in my data-collecting procedures and discuss possible solutions. By connecting my discoveries with real-world applications, I reach closure with my project and conclude my presentation.

    The judge walks away with a smile on his face, and I realize that my speech was successful: it informed and captivated him, elevating me to the 1st place medal. I marvel at the power of speech: its ability to persuade and compel . Effective communication is my secret weapon, public speaking my mindset, two unique aspects that paves the path I walk today.

  • RD 2

    My face drops as I see the projects competing against us in the science fair. Standing next to these complex engineering projects, my sun-tracking solar panel feels unsophisticated and unlikely to win. Yet, I still hold a trump card: the judged presentation. As a master of public speaking, my ability to clearly communicate my ideas through speech drives my successes in STEM fields.

    The judge approaches, and dispensing all formalities, I dive into the presentation. My passion for the topic bleeds through my speech and infects the judge. He expresses admiration at my innate understanding of my topic as I describe the scientific concepts underlying our project. I address flaws in the experiment and data,and the judge is impressed by this self-reflection. I conclude my presentation by connecting our discoveries with real-world applications. Firmly shaking my hand, the judge walks away.

    From afar, I see the judge smiling to himself, and I know that my speech was successful. My presentation informed and captivated the judges, elevating me above my competition. 1st place trophy in hand, I marvel at the power of speech: its ability to persuade and compel. Effective communication is my secret weapon, and has paved the path to the success I enjoy today.

  • RD 1

    “99% of the population is afraid of public speaking, and of the remaining 1%, 99% have nothing interesting to say.” Perhaps my most integral and unique characteristic, my public speaking ability has enhanced and driven my successes in STEM fields.

    After months of experimenting, my research team presented an optimized solar panel in the 9th grade science fair.To our dismay, our project was one of the least sophisticated in our division. Yet, in our presentation, we projected clarity and showed our intricate understanding of our topic. Our stellar presentation earned us the highest honor in our division.

    I believe in the power of public speaking in complementing science. At Caltech, I will continue to develop my elocution and communication ability. In the future, with public speaking, I will collaborate with my research team, communicate my results with fellow scientists, and publicize my results to the world.
    192 words

  • Final Draft

    ‘ve hit a wall. Scanning research articles and my code for weeks hasn’t made any headway, yet the algorithm seems tantalizingly close. I reflect upon the transformation of my simple mammogram processing research into automated breast cancer detection. Yet, one key aspect of my research, detecting irregularities, still eludes me. The solution strikes 4,000 ft up a mountain, miles away from the technology that propels my research.

    Kneeling down by a creek to quench my thirst, a sight catches my eye. In my peripherals, rainfall trickles through the dirt and accumulates on the surface. Racing with ideas, I theorize that simulated rainfall on a system would accumulate near the cancerous abnormalities. Small observations like these trigger my best inspirations. At Caltech, I will work with my fellow students to find simple solutions for the complex problems I encounter in class and research.

    With only pen and notepad, I flesh out the rainfall idea into a practical abnormality detector. Borrowing algorithms from my EdX and Coursera data analysis courses, I create a prototype of the rainfall algorithm, which is slow and inefficient. Utilizing a design review I learned from robotics, I repetitively optimize the code, and explore alternative algorithms to enhance my design. At Caltech, professors of applied mathematics and other scientific disciplines will teach me new statistical analysis techniques to further enhance the ideas that I derive.

    Hunched over a laptop, furiously typing code for hours, my research comes to life. I design simulations and experiments to test whether the problem is fixed. Fetching a few abnormal cancerous images, my detection algorithm boots up, and the test begins. “30% complete.” Anxiety claws at me. “60%” . Nervousness racks my body, and the progress counter seems to slow down. “100%”. Finally, the program exits, and I quickly scan the results. One line pops out “Cancer status: positive; Type: Abnormal Lesion.” I leap up out of my chair in excitement and celebrate the success of my algorithm.The significance of my success hits me.I am no longer reading the book of science. I am writing it.

    Research drives me to discover and pursue society’s problems. My enthusiasm for research will bleed into my peers at Caltech, and together we will discuss problem sets and our endeavors outside of classes. I will frequent the Annenburg Center to glean knowledge from my esteemed professors. As I brainstorm answers to my research questions sitting next to the turtle pond, perhaps the sight of a turtle poking its head above a lily will inspire a solution. Caltech’s academic rigor and supportive family will best prepare me for my future in graduate school and research beyond. In ten years, with my knowledge in mathematics from Caltech, I hope to be tackling the world’s problems and making a difference.

  • RD 2

    I’ve hit a wall. Scanning research articles and my code for weeks haven’t made any headway, yet the algorithm seems tantalizingly close. I reminisce upon the transformation of my simple mammogram processing research into automated breast cancer detection. Yet, one key aspect of my research, detecting irregularities, still eludes me. The solution strikes 4,000 ft up a mountain, miles away from the technology that propels my research.

    Kneeling down by a creek to quench my thirst, a sight caught my eye. In my peripherals, rainfall trickles through the dirt and accumulated on the dirt at the surface. Racing with ideas, I theorize that simulated rainfall on a system would accumulate near the cancerous abnormalities. Small observations like these trigger my best inspirations. At Caltech, I will work with my fellow students to find simple solutions for the complex problems I encounter in class and research.

    Through an iterative design review, my process to optimize the solution. Initially, my cancer image analysis was slow and inefficient. By repetitively making small optimizations in the code, and choosing slightly faster algorithm in the code, I sped up the code by over 200%. At Caltech, professors of applied mathematics and other scientific disciplines will teach me new statistical analysis techniques to further enhance the ideas that I derive.

      Hunched over a laptop, furiously typing code for hours, my research comes to life. I design simulations and experiments to test whether the problem is fixed. Fetching a few abnormal cancerous images, I boot up my detection algorithm, and the test begins. "30% complete." Anxiety claws at me. "60%" .  The progress counter seemingly slows down as nervousness. "100%". The program exits, and as I scan the results, one line pops out  "Cancer status: positive; Type: Abnormal Lesion." I leap up out of my chair in euphoria and celebrate the hard-earned success of my algorithm. After the initial elation wears off, the significance of my success hits me. I am no longer reading the book of science. I am writing it.
    
           Research drives me to discover and inspires me to pursue society's problems. My enthusiasm for research will bleed into my peers at Caltech, and together we will discuss problem sets and our endeavors outside of classes. I will frequent the Annenburg Center to glean knowledge from my esteemed professors. As I  brainstorm answers to my research questions, perhaps the sight of a turtle poking its head above a lily in the turtle pond will inspire a solution. Caltech's academic rigor and supportive family will best prepare me for my life in research, and hopefully in ten years, with my knowledge in mathematics from Caltech, I hope to be solving future problems and making a difference.
  • RD 1

    At first, it was nothing big, simply an image recognition project. However, countless machine learning lectures and a magical news article evolved my imaging software into a sophisticated breast cancer detection algorithm.

       Inspired by recent advances in mammography, I research to find connections between cancer proliferation and mammographic image to speed up and automate breast cancer detection. I am armed with a notepad nested in my back pocket, a disappearing blue ballpoint pen, and a bulky laptop computer that contains a lifetime worth of computer projects. I tackle issues in my research by subdividing the problem , developing small solutions for each part, and establishing a cohesive solution by integrating the individual parts.  Equipped with these tools and strategy, I have spent the last 2 years pursuing this field of research.
    
         My best inspirations come from small observations, so when ideas strike, I capture them in my notepad. While hiking one day, I noticed a trickle of rainfall that could model an aspect of breast cancer detection. Simulation of rainfall in the environment allowed me to find abnormalities in tumors, and served as the cornerstone for my work. At Caltech, I will collaborate with my fellow intellectuals to find simple solutions for the problems I encounter in class and in research.

    I tweak my ideas through an iterative design review, my process to optimize the solution. Initially, my cancer image analysis was slow and inefficient. By repetitively making small optimizations in the code, and choosing slightly faster algorithm in the code, I sped up the code by over 200%. From the professors of applied mathematics in the CMS department at Caltech, I will learn new statistical analysis techniques and design processes to further enhance the ideas that I derive.

      The most thrilling part of research is seeing my solutions come to life. I design simulations and experiments to test whether the problem is fixed. As I code on my slow laptop, I am constantly reminded of the importance of speed and efficiency. When a test succeeds, as small my new discovery may be, it fills me with elation. At that point, I realize I have ceased reading the book of science. Now, I am writing it.

    My academic drive is focused upon scientific research with applied mathematics. At Caltech, I will expand my arsenal to tackle the problems and challenges I meet in research. I will learn from the experts in my field, and discuss problem sets and techniques with my fellow students. Through SURF, I will gain experience in an research environment. Hopefully, in ten years, with my knowledge and experience in mathematics from Caltech, I will be solving future problems and making a difference.

  • Despite the short period of time that has elapsed since I submitted my application, I’ve managed to make progress in my extracurriculars and my research.
    Two weeks ago, I led our science bowl team to the regional competition. Our team this year was younger, yet our solid performance in a very tough pool indicated that my efforts at teaching AP level science classes to high school freshman and sophomores were successful.
    I competed in a Model United Nations conference last weekend in San Jose, CA. Here, representing the country of China in the International Atomic Energy Association,I received the Best Delegation award. Over that weekend, not only did I win the committee, I learned to be a better problem solver and diplomat.
    In December, I participated in a Mathleague competition representing my high school. Here, at the regional competition, I advanced to the state level for both team and individual events.
    This year, I was selected to be a starting prosecution attorney for our Mock Trial program, a distinction granted to only 10% of people who sign up for the class. Currently, we are in the county level competition.
    My fight against cancer continues.. Although I didn’t recieve any awards from the Intel STS or Siemens program, I am still pursuing publication from a biomedical journal. Furthermore, I have shifted the focus on my cancer angiogenesis research to a memoryless simulation. This project, which I hope to submit to ISEF, will optimize the cancer proliferation modelling to a greater extent.

  • Robotics: The unofficial vice president, member of the Alpha team and the lead programmer, I build and program robots to compete in VEX Robotics Competitions. Since freshman year, I’ve expanded the program, and taught newbies the essentials of robotics.

    Science Research: I model vascular growth triggered by cancerous cells using applied mathematics , a project submitted to Intel STS. As the president of our school’s Honors Science Society, I mentor others’ science fair projects and drive fellow students to conduct research.

    Science Bowl: I am the president (formerly copresident) of the club, teaching facts from all scientific disciplines to fellow members through fast paced questions. Together, we compete in the DoE Science Bowl, where I captain the team.

    Marching Band: Our marching band competes in field show competitions across California. Through the fall, we practice for 17 hours each week, perfecting our marching and playing technique. I am the flute section leader, and I teach and lead 5 other flutes.

    Model United Nations: Representing countries at conferences at Stanford, UC Berkeley and more, I debate current world issues. Through Model United Nations, I discovered my passion for public speaking. I develop a great understanding of world politics and pertinent global issues through MUN.

  • Final Draft

    “Sa re ga ma” My voice moves smoothly with the harmonium, kicking off an evening of Bengali music. The tunes of Rabindranath Tagore and Kazi Nazrul Islam float throughout the house. As our vocal cords harmonize, we come closer together as a family. We celebrate pujas with festive spirit, poetry recitals, singalongs, firecrackers, and of course savory treats. During the festivals, I am in a completely different realm: a miniature India. When I step back into the world, I keep my Bengali heritage close to my heart.

  • Summarize your contributions to this project. What were the specific tasks that you were involved in?*

    This research project is entirely my own. I came up with the idea by myself, inspired by contemporary research in the field. After learning from online courses and studying scientific journals, I designed the model for my research. I was solely responsible for coding the algorithms and their supporting frameworks. I modeled my testing process off previous research, but I had to redesign major portions due to incompatibilities. I wrote the full research paper for this project, although I recieved editing help from my family.

    To fully understand the work, I contacted mathematics and computer science professors for clarification. My primary outside contact was Dr. Kamalika Chaudhuri (UC San Diego), who helped me design my partial differential equation solver in my research and also critiqued my research paper. Data was obtained from other research articles and the SEER database (National Cancer Institute). With these two exceptions, my research was fully self-driven and done by myself.

    What did you learn about the research process and your research interests?*

    Previous to this research project, I had done science fair projects for 5 years, all on varied problems, yet with a common thread. These previous projects helped me hone my research interests to the computer science/ mathematics categories, yet as I conducted my research, I found myself tending more towards the applied mathematics aspect. Computer science became a tool that I could use to apply mathematics to my project.

  • Final Draft

    A glint of silver flashes down my arm. With my shako set, I march onto the glistening grass. The stadium looms in front of me, crowded with spectators and judges. As the drum major’s hands go up, my flute snaps up to attention. Brought together by a passion for music, the marching band around me has become my family. Alone, we are ants with tiny voices. Together, we are unified, a group with a single voice and a single mind. On the field, we make more than music. We make memories.

  • Final Draft

    Parlez vous mathématiques? Mathematics is my language, a set of numbers and equations I can order to describe everything in the world around me. In my research, I harness applied mathematics to understand cancer proliferation, and my discoveries in this field showcase the power of math. Through Course 18 at MIT, I hope to gain fluency in the magnificent tacklelanguage of mathematics to help me the world’s most complex problems.

  • RD 2

    Parlez vous mathématiques? Mathematics is my language, a set of numbers and equations I can order to describe anything in the world around me .In my research, I harness the power of applied mathematics to understand cancer proliferation. My mathematical models evaluate the growth of blood vessels in cancerous cells, and my discoveries in this field impress the power of math upon me. At MIT, through Course 18, I will continue learning the magnificent language of mathematics to help me tackle the problems of the future.

  • RD 1

    Parlez vous mathématiques? To me, mathematics is a language, a jumble of numbers and equations. When ordered and combined, these potent symbols describe the world around me.Through applied mathematics, I describe and discover scientific phenomena and problems. In my research on cancer proliferation, my mathematical models help me evaluate the effect of growth-inducing chemicals on cancerous cells. At MIT, I will continue applying mathematics to tackle real world applications through Course 18.

  • Final Draft

    A sea of suits crowds the auditorium. Pacing back and forth on stage, I prepare to deliver my speech on drone technology. This is Model United Nations, where delegates represent countries from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe to resolve world problems. Here, I feed my obsession with public speaking, a vital part of my personality that shapes my world. I sharpen my ability to enthrall through speech.
    “Saudi Arabia, you have 2 minutes.” When I speak, I am a painter. My words are brushstrokes, and the speech is my painting. I sketch a background of drone use in wars, the foundation for my speech. Looking the audience in the eye, I paint the deplorable humanitarian situations in areas ravaged by drones in a dark hue. Hand gestures accompany the slow but clear pace of my speech. My voice thunders across the auditorium as I incite the delegates to deal with the drone crisis immediately.
    “Time’s up!” Stepping off my podium, I realize that my speech has captivated my fellow delegates. Whether in MUN or my scientific pursuits, I create long lasting impressions through my presentations. At robotics competitions, I enthusiastically describe the design of our robot to sponsors and judges. Discussing my research with peers, I clearly explain my methods and my discoveries. Public speaking has helped me understand the importance of effective communication. Whenever I speak, I’m always on the stage, aspiring to inform, entrance and captivate.

  • RD 3

    A sea of black suits crowds the classroom. Surrounded by well-dressed delegates representing countries from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe, I prepare my speech regarding drone technology. This is Model UN, a fast paced simulation of the United Nations. My talkative nature excels here, allowing me to powerfully communicate through public speaking.

      An air of calmness surrounds me when I step onto the stage.  "Saudi Arabia, you have 2 minutes."  I am a painter, my words brushstrokes, the speech my painting. I discuss my country's policy, connecting drones with the war in the Middle East. In a dark dismal hue, I paint the deplorable humanitarian situations in areas with drones . My voice tinges with hope as I discuss possible solutions to the crisis like bans or sanctions , and a bright complexion emerges out of the painting. I put on the final touches, concluding with a call to action to join me in banning drones.

    “Time’s Up!” The nods of approval across the crowd make me realize that my speech achieved its goal:informing and inspiring my fellow delegates. Outside of MUN, my chatty talkative nature expresses itself in scientific fields. At robotics competitions, I enthusiastically describe the design of our robot to sponsors and judges. I can rattle on and on about my research, talking about my methods, my results, or their practical applications. No matter where I am, my love of talking affects the way I act. When I speak, I’m always on the stage, aspiring to entrance and captivate.

  • RD 2

    A sea of suits crowds the lectern where I will give my address. Surrounded by well-dressed delegates representing countries from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe, I prepare my speech discussing drone technology. This is Model UN, a fast paced simulation of the United Nations. Driven by a sociable and talkative attitude, I excel here, honing my ability to powerfully communicate through public speaking.
    4 years of MUN have acclimated me to the stress , and an air of calmness surrounds me on the stage. “Saudi Arabia, you have 2 minutes” Launching into my presentation, I bring up little known facts, eliciting responses of wonder. The interest of the crowd piques when I connect with the situation in Syria. Shifting tone, I deplore the poor humanitarian situations in drone strike areas. Inciting my fellow delegates to action,I urge the committee to permanently ban drones .

    “Time’s Up!” Seeing the nods of approval across the crowd, I know that I’ve won over my audience. The speech not only informed my fellow delegates, it also captivated them. Wherever I go, I attempt to create lasting impressions through my presentations. In robotics, I am a storyteller, walking people through the design of our robot. When I discuss my research with peers, I inspire by expounding on the relevance of the discoveries I made. My innate love for public speech affects the way I act, and no matter where I am, I’m always on the stage, attempting to entrance and captivate.

  • “99% of the population is afraid of public speaking, and of the remaining 1%, 99% have nothing interesting to say.” An unique characteristic that defines me, my public speaking skill changes the way I view and tackle problems.

    In 9th grade, after months of experimenting, my research team finished developing an optimized solar panel. To our dismay our project was less sophisticated than many in our division. Yet, when the judges came, our presentation exuded enthusiasm, projected clarity, and showed the innate understanding of our topic. Thanks to the power of communication, we earned the highest honor in our division.

    My eloquent elocution is most useful in Model United Nations. Over the last 4 years, I have represented countries from radicals like Syria to powerhouses like France. Together with my fellow delegates, we resolve world problems, and prevent crises (like Russia taking over the world). I lead discussion for these topics and help coordinate the many members in the council.

    My various escapades in high schools have instilled in me the power of speech: its ability to persuade and compel. At MIT, I will develop communication through various clubs like MITMUN.

  • Final Draft

    The truncated icosahedron skips down the field. I break into a sprint, and maneuver the soccer ball past the defender. Only the goalie stands between me and a hat-trick. Aiming for the top corner of the goal, I lean back and shoot.

    From dawn to dusk, I inhabit a world of academics and scientific discovery. My rigorous AP classes sate my thirst for challenge. Firing abstruse details at me like machine gun fire, teachers bombard me with lectures. By quickly making connections with what I learn, I cope with this influx of knowledge. Although stressful, this stream of new information fuels my drive to discover.

    My life in academia is punctuated by brief moments of nature that reinvigorate me. Leaving my stress and AP textbooks at home, I pick up my soccer cleats and dive into a soccer game. My worries don’t follow me onto the soccer field. Breathing in the fresh air, I immerse myself in the serene world around me, and truly live.

    “Clang!” The ball ricochets off the crossbar. I pursue the loose ball again, shoot , and this time, the ball meets the back of the net. Whether it takes one shot or hundred, I attack my problems till I conquer them. From academia, I develop a toolbox of knowledge. From nature, I find inspiration to persevere. Together, these worlds drive me forward to make the world a better place.

  • RD 2

    The truncated icosahedron skips down the field. I break into a sprint, and manuever the soccer ball past the defender. Only the goalie stands between me and a hat-trick. Aiming for the top corner of the goal, I lean back and shoot.
    From dawn to dusk, I inhabit a world of academics and scientific discovery. My rigorous AP classes sate my thirst for challenge. Firing abstruse details at me like machine gun fire, teachers bombard me with lectures. By quickly making connections in what I learn, I cope with this influx of knowledge. Although stressful, this stream of new information fuels my drive to discover.
    My life in academia is punctuated by brief moments of nature that reinvigorate me. Leaving my stress and AP textbooks at home, I pick up my soccer cleats and go to play ball. On the crisp green grass, I dive into a pickup soccer game. Stress doesn’t follow me onto the soccer field. Breathing in the fresh air, I immerse myself into the serene world around me, and truly live.
    “Clang!” The ball ricochets off the crossbar. Unfazed, I pursue the loose ball, shoot again, and the ball meets the back of the net. Whether it takes one shot or hundred, I will attack my problems till I best them. From academia, I develop a toolbox of knowledge. From nature, I find inspiration to persevere. Together, these worlds drive me forward to research and tackle the problems of the future.

  • RD 1

    The truncated icosahedron skips down the field. I break into a dead sprint to get the soccer ball before the defender does. Past the defender now, only the goalie stands between me and a hat-trick. Aiming for the top corner of the goal, I wind up and drive my power into the ball.
    From dawn to dusk, I inhabit a world of academics and scientific discovery. I feed on challenge and my rigorous AP classes sate my thirst for knowledge. I am pummeled with lecture after lecture, and abstruse details are shot at me like machine gun fire. Abstruse questions to make connections in the material.

    My life in academia is punctuated by brief moments of nature that revitalize me. Leaving my stress and AP textbooks at home, I pick up my cleats and march to the soccer field. I live, laugh, and enjoy the small pickup game with friends.
    The ball flies towards its destination, but the menacing goalie blocks it. “Clang!” It ricochets off the crossbar. Unfazed, I pursue the ball, shoot again, and score. Whether it takes one shot or a hundred, I will continue attacking my problems till I best them. From nature, I find the patience and inspiration to persevere. From science, I develop the knowledge to help me conquer the problem. Together, these worlds drive me to tackle world problems of the future.

  • Final Draft

    “Completion time: 1000 minutes” I pore through the code over and over, the algorithm burned into my brain by now. For weeks, I have studied research articles and experiment with alternative algorithms, but have made no headway. Just outside my grasp, the optimal algorithm dances tauntingly.
    My journey in mathematical modelling of blood vessels in cancer has taken me through many strange avenues. Tracking the movement of cancer required the calculation of cellular surface area. My initial software was unbearably slow, a seemingly simple case of inefficient code. Further testing revealed that the algorithm was flawed, and required a complete redesign. Unfazed, I labored on, researching and testing different algorithms, and reading contemporary research articles. Yet, two weeks have passed, but the negative results still pile up and my drive begins to dwindle.

    Inspiration strikes on a play-date with my 6 year old cousin. Trying to count her Legos, instead she accidentally counts the sides. Immediately, I theorize that calculating the surface area like counting sides of Legos would speed up the algorithm. A hectic coding session finalizes and confirms the result. “Completion Time: 1.2 minutes”. Away from the technology that drives my research, reflections and inspirations help me overcome the challenges. Research continues to throw curveballs at me, but I don’t give up. When the challenge seems insurmountable, I remember the reason I research: beyond the obstacle lies a goal worth fighting for.

  • RD 3

    “Completion time: 1000 minutes” I pore through the code over and over, the algorithm burned into my brain by now. For weeks, I study research articles and experiment with alternative algorithms, but I make no headway. Just outside my grasp, the optimal algorithm dances tauntingly.
    My journey in mathematically modelling the spread of blood vessels in cancer has taken me through many strange avenues. While tracking the movement of cancerous cells, I needed to calculate the surface area of cells. My initial software was unbearably slow, a seemingly simple case of inefficient code. Further testing revealed that the algorithm was flawed, and required a complete redesign. Unfazed, I labored, researching and testing different algorithms, and reading contemporary research articles. Yet, the negative results still pile up, and my drive begins to dwindle, the project almost abandoned as a lost hope.
    Inspiration strikes on a playdate with my 6 year old cousin. Trying to count her Legos, she instead accidentally counts the sides. Immediately, I theorize that calculating the surface area like counting sides of Legos would speed up the algorithm. A hectic coding session finalizes and confirms the result. “Completion Time: 1.2 minutes”. Away from the technology that drives my research, simple inspirations help me overcome the challenges. Research continues to throw curveballs at me, but I persevere. When the challenge seems insurmountable, I remember the reason I research: beyond the obstacle lies a goal worth fighting for.

  • RD 2

    “Completion time: 1000 minutes” Poring through the code over and over, my algorithms are burned into my brain by now. My laptop is full of code for alternative algorithms that prove no avail. Research journals are scattered across my desk, none with the proper solution . Weeks of searching make no headway, yet the optimal algorithm dances tantalizingly close to my fingertips.

    My journey in mathematically modelling the spread of blood vessels in cancer has taken me to many strange avenues. While tracking the movement of the cancerous cells, I needed to speedily calculate the surface area of cells. My initial algorithm was unbearably slow, a seemingly simple case of inefficient code. Further testing revealed that the algorithm was flawed, and required a complete redesign. Unfazed, I labored, researching and testing different algorithms, rewriting code, and reading contemporary research articles, yet the negative results still pile up. With no positive My drive begins to dwindle, and the project is abandoned, a lost hope, left for the mites in my room .

    Inspiration struck on a play date with my 6 year old cousin. Trying to count her Legos, she instead was accidentally counting the sides. Immediately, I theorize that calculating the surface area like counting sides of Legos would speed up the algorithm. Digging back into my project , a hectic coding session finalizes and confirms the result. “Completion Time: 1.2 minutes”. The obstacle nearly sent my project into a death spiral, but I overcame the roadblock and proceeded to further discoveries. Research will continue throwing curveballs at me, and even when the challenge seems impossible, I remember the reason I research: beyond the obstacle lies a goal worth fighting for.

  • RD 1

    “Completion time: 1000 minutes” The code must be burned into my brain by now. I’ve experimented and researched for weeks, but the optimal algorithm still eludes me. I keep searching , yet wonder if this impossible problem would capsize my project.

    Over the last two years, I have mathematically modelled the spread of blood vessels in cancer. An important aspect in my research was tracking surface area of cells, but my algorithm to evaluate surface area was unbearably slow. The problem seemed to be inefficient code, but actually, the algorithm itself was flawed, and redesign was needed to fix the issue. I labored, reading scientific journals to find solutions and testing different algorithms, all to no avail. As negative results pile up, my drive flags, and I almost quit on my research. It took Legos and a kid’s mindset to defeat the surface area algorithm.

    One day, I noticed my cousin trying to count his Legos, but instead accidentally counting the sides. Inspiration struck. Calculating the surface area like counting the sides of Legos would greatly speed up the algorithm and coding confirmed the result. Finally, my surface area algorithm was successful.

    “Completion Time: 1.2 minutes”. Although the surface area obstacle nearly downed me, the process developed my knowledge , and propelled me to further research. Research will continue to throw impossible problems at me, but I will struggle on. I will not cease, for I know that past the obstacle lies a goal worth laboring for.

  • My research was primarily independent and self-driven, but it had two major influences. Firstly, my father, Prasanta Ghosh, advised my project and guided me through the research process. I also received outside help from Dr. Kamalika Chaudhuri (Assistant Professor at UC San Diego) .A mutual family friend, she helped me develop my PDE solver and critiqued my research paper. She played a minor role in my research.

  • Inspired to model cancer angiogenesis, I read through research articles to glean knowledge of the topic and find a research question. I narrowed down my pursuit to a few subtopics, which I intensively studied. I was drawn to a combinatory model, which integrates various aspects of angiogenesis into a single model. Piqued by the challenge of integrating multiple models, the allure of increased accuracy and the many practical applications of combinatory models, I chose to pursue this field.

  • The current thread of research began in May of 2014. I’ve conducted this research (parttime during school and fulltime during summer) ever since. My research continues to this day, but the project is based on my findings as of October 2014.
    May - June 2014 — 3 hours/week
    June - August 2014 — 40 hours/week
    August 2014- Present — 6 hours/week

  • Developing/Initiating the purpose of the research
    400 chars

  • Designing the procedures:
    400 chars

  • Implementing the procedure (including special techniques or the use of special equipment)
    400 chars

  • Gathering / Recording Data
    400 chars

  • Analyzing Data/Performing Calculations:
    400 chars

  • Formulating Conclusions:

    400 chars

  • Parlez vous mathématiques? Mathematics is my language, a set of numbers and equations I order to describe the world around me. In college, I will gain fluency in the language of applied mathematics. Using this knowledge, I will tackle the world’s most complex problems through applied mathematics.

  • Cut Down

    Angiogenesis, the creation of blood vessels to let oxygen reach cells, plays a critical role in cancer proliferations. In this research, we extend previously developed theoretical models to a practical patient-based solution. Our model has two focuses: a) the movement of chemicals in the system, b) the interactions amongst cells. We find the 3 main factors required for angiogenesis to complete: the density of cancerous cells, the density of the extracellular matrix, and the distance between the tumor and blood vessels. Overall, this research develops a framework for analysis of angiogenesis in patients, With future medical technology, this will allow for diagnosis of the criticality of tumors through body scans.

  • Angiogenesis, the creation of new blood vessels from the cardiovascular system to let oxygen and nutrients reach new cells, plays a critical role in cancer proliferation and metastasis. In this research, we extend the theoretical models to a more practical patient-based solution. Our model has two main focuses: a) the movement of chemicals between the tumor and blood vessels, b) the interactions between cells in the environment. Through testing, we find the 3 main factors in the success for cancer to complete angiogenesis: the density of cancerous cells, the density of the extracellular matrix, and the distance between the tumor and blood vessels. Overall, this research develops a practical framework for analysis of angiogenesis in individual patients. Although the necessary medical imaging technology is still in development, this model will allows people to understand the criticality of their tumor from medical scans, based on the likelihood of angiogenesis to complete.

  • My aunt was falsely diagnosed with cancer in late 2012, and underwent many surgeries and treatments, leaving her debilitated. My eyes were opened to the many faults in the fields of cancer diagnosis and treatment, and I was driven to learn more. I initially pursued cancer diagnosis, with my breast cancer detection research, yet found that my interests didn’t lie there. Studying how cancer proliferated, I discovered the field of cancer angiogenesis, the relationship between tumors and blood vessels. I was piqued by the interactions between noncancerous vascular tissue, yet also disappointed by the lack of practical extensions of angiogenesis models. Within my disappointment, I found opportunity. Enthralled by the chance to have a practical effect in the world, I set off to study and develop real-life connections of cancer-induced angiogenesis.

  • Cut Down

    This research has furthered my interest in applied mathematics. I started my project with two main topics in mind: applied mathematics and computer science. As I conducted my research, I realized that my aspirations rested in applied mathematics, and that my computer acumen was only a tool for achieving it. I am entranced by the world of research, and to this day, I continue pursuing my interest in mathematics through my study of angiogenesis.

    Furthermore, mathematical modelling of cancer angiogenesis has revealed many insights about the research process. Unaccustomed to pursuing mathematics at such a deep level, where many concepts remain undiscovered, I encountered many problems. Realizing that I couldn’t overcome these obstacles without complete focus, I learned to handle procrastination and my distractions.

  • Mathematical modelling of cancer angiogenesis has revealed many insights about the research process. Unaccustomed to pursuing mathematics at such a deep level, where many concepts remain undiscovered, I encountered many problems. Realizing that I couldn’t overcome these obstacles without complete focus, I learned to handle procrastination and my distractions.

    Especially in applied mathematics, physical data is necessary to prove my modelling predictions. Sometimes, without data, my models are incorrect, cautioning me to be weary of my results. Despite the occasional false result, the thrill I experienced after correctly linking my model predictions with experimental data was unparalleled and drove me to research further.

    This research has furthered my interest in applied mathematics. I started my project with two main topics in mind: applied mathematics and computer science. As I conducted my research, I realized that my aspirations rested in applied mathematics, and that my computer acumen was only a tool for achieving it. I am entranced by the world of research, and to this day, I continue pursuing my interest in mathematics through my study of angiogenesis.

  • Hundreds of thousands of cancer-stricken people undergo the wrong treatment due to miscalculations of the severeness of the cancer, leading to unnecessary surgeries to malignant tumors missing treatment. This research diagnoses the criticality of a tumor by determining the likelihood of angiogenesis to complete, a factor in metastasis and proliferation. By understanding how the patient’s cancer angiogenesizes and proliferates, this technology will provide the appropriate level of treatment and maximize chances of being cured.
    Despite this theoretical background, there remain many technologies that need to be developed for the full functioning of this model. The model developed in this paper is dependent upon many individual inputs that are specific to the tumor and requires new nonintrusive tests to find these levels. Furthermore, for the cancer criticality detector to be effective, technology to create 3d models of the cardiovascular system surrounding the tumor will be necessary.

  • I’ve hit a wall. Scanning research articles and my code for weeks hasn’t made any headway, yet the algorithm seems tantalizingly close. I reflect upon the transformation of my simple mammogram processing research into automated breast cancer detection. Yet, one key aspect of my research, detecting irregularities, still eludes me. The solution strikes 4,000 ft up a mountain, miles away from the technology that propels my research.
    Kneeling down by a creek to quench my thirst, a sight catches my eye. In my peripherals, rainfall trickles through the dirt and accumulates on the surface. Racing with ideas, I theorize that simulated rainfall on a system would accumulate near the cancerous abnormalities. Small observations like these trigger my best inspirations. Even when away from my research, I am attentive, forever looking for connections. My scientific curiousity never leaves me, and whenever I encounter a new experience, I tackle it with the same passion that drives my research.
    With only pen and notepad, I flesh out the rainfall idea into a practical abnormality detector. Studying from my EdX and Coursera data analysis courses, I develop a database of information on the topic. Whether from research journals, Wikipedia articles, or my Science Bowl ventures, I am constantly on the pursuit of knowledge. Utilizing a design review I learned from robotics, I repetitively optimize the code, and explore alternative algorithms to enhance my design. When I optimize my algorithms, I am persistent, never yielding to below perfection, an attitude of perseverance that permeates everything I do.
    Hunched over a laptop, furiously typing code for hours, my rainfall algorithm comes to life. Fetching a few abnormal cancerous images, my detection algorithm boots up, and the test begins. “30% complete.” Anxiety claws at me. “60%” . Nervousness racks my body, and the progress counter seems to slow down. “100%”. Finally, the program exits, and I analyze the data. With a keen eye, I examine the results to find abnormalities, and one line pops out as an abnormality. “Cancer status: positive; Type: Abnormal Lesion.” My attention to detail has has been crucial to advancing my research, and is the paradigm that I view my world with.
    At heart, I am a scientist,society’s problems driving my research. Research is a never-ending cycle of new obstacles, but with my perseverance and intellectual curiousity, I learn and discover. My passion for science bleeds through my resolve and scientific attitude, and as a future scientist, I will fight on to understand and conquer the world’s most challenging problems.

  • Mod this for the Prompt

    ‘ve hit a wall. Scanning research articles and my code for weeks hasn’t made any headway, yet the algorithm seems tantalizingly close. I reflect upon the transformation of my simple mammogram processing research into automated breast cancer detection. Yet, one key aspect of my research, detecting irregularities, still eludes me. The solution strikes 4,000 ft up a mountain, miles away from the technology that propels my research.

    Kneeling down by a creek to quench my thirst, a sight catches my eye. In my peripherals, rainfall trickles through the dirt and accumulates on the surface. Racing with ideas, I theorize that simulated rainfall on a system would accumulate near the cancerous abnormalities. Small observations like these trigger my best inspirations. At Caltech, I will work with my fellow students to find simple solutions for the complex problems I encounter in class and research.

    With only pen and notepad, I flesh out the rainfall idea into a practical abnormality detector. Borrowing algorithms from my EdX and Coursera data analysis courses, I create a prototype of the rainfall algorithm, which is slow and inefficient. Utilizing a design review I learned from robotics, I repetitively optimize the code, and explore alternative algorithms to enhance my design. At Caltech, professors of applied mathematics and other scientific disciplines will teach me new statistical analysis techniques to further enhance the ideas that I derive.

    Hunched over a laptop, furiously typing code for hours, my research comes to life. I design simulations and experiments to test whether the problem is fixed. Fetching a few abnormal cancerous images, my detection algorithm boots up, and the test begins. “30% complete.” Anxiety claws at me. “60%” . Nervousness racks my body, and the progress counter seems to slow down. “100%”. Finally, the program exits, and I quickly scan the results. One line pops out “Cancer status: positive; Type: Abnormal Lesion.” I leap up out of my chair in excitement and celebrate the success of my algorithm.The significance of my success hits me.I am no longer reading the book of science. I am writing it.

    Research drives me to discover and pursue society’s problems. My enthusiasm for research will bleed into my peers at Caltech, and together we will discuss problem sets and our endeavors outside of classes. I will frequent the Annenburg Center to glean knowledge from my esteemed professors. As I brainstorm answers to my research questions sitting next to the turtle pond, perhaps the sight of a turtle poking its head above a lily will inspire a solution. Caltech’s academic rigor and supportive family will best prepare me for my future in graduate school and research beyond. In ten years, with my knowledge in mathematics from Caltech, I hope to be tackling the world’s problems and making a difference.

  • “Doctor, will I live?” “How far will my tumor spread?” “How much longer do I have to live?” These questions echo throughout medical clinics, only to be met with resounding silence or meek apologies. The expansive field of cancer proliferation attempts to answer and explain such questions in the most accurate way possible. To this day, many discoveries have been made in predicting the growth pattern of tumors. In the future, our understanding of how cancers grow will be significantly greater, enough to track and locate the future location of cancerous lesions. By understanding the process that drives the spread of cancer, we can preemptively strike where the cancer will go next, leading to more effective treatments. Furthermore, if we are able to develop inversible mathematical models that properly detail cancer proliferation, then we can determine the optimal circumstances in which cancers occur to prevent cancer from starting in the first place.
    I chose cancer-induced angiogenesis as my field of research because of its high potential to make a difference in our understanding of cancer proliferation. As a currently new field, there aren’t many discoveries, but future research will clearly change. My research shifted focus from the typical mathematical models of angiogenesis to its effects on cancer proliferation. My innovative criticality algorithm for tumors gave rudimentary predictions on the chances of tumor metastasis. Unfortunately, analysis has shown that the randomness of the environment can often overwhelm these factors. Future research in this field will not only reduce the impact of the randomness on the predictions by finding new factors and algorithms. Not only will we have more accurate diagnostic software thanks to angiogenesis, it will also be aided by medical technology which hopefully will be able to create 3d models of the cellular environment, and visually depict the progression of the cancer through the environment.
    Angiogenesis is clearly one of the newest subfields for cancer proliferation. Despite the lack of previous discoveries, I can predict with great certainty that our understanding of angiogenesis will have a tremendous impact upon society as a whole. 20 years from now, the main focus of angiogenesis will clearly be upon its impact on cancer proliferation. Furthermore, the angiogenesis research will also study protein modelling, to find ways to inhibit angiogenesis. Whether the focus be diagnosing tumors, detecting where they will migrate to, or methods of inhibition, research on modelling angiogenesis will play a tremendous role in our understanding of cancer proliferation far into the future, and positively benefit society in the process.

  • Very Very Rudimentary Draft

    “Doctor, will I live?” “So, how far will my tumor spread?” “How much longer do I have to live?” These questions echo throughout medical clinics, only to be met with resounding silence or meek apologies. The expansive field of cancer proliferation attempts to answer and explain such questions in the most accurate way possible. To this day, there have been many discoveries in predicting the growth pattern of tumors. In the future, our understanding of how cancers grow will be significantly larger, and such advances can lead to more effective treatments and possibly …..

    My research has given me hints as to predicting the future movement of tumors. When I computed various simulations with differing variables, I was able to determine the ffects of variables like cell density and distance for angiogenesis ot occur. By determining what the time required for angiogenesis to complete coupled with the average nonhypoxic cancer spread rate, I was able to rudimentarily answer these questions.

    Angiogenesis is one of the new fields for understanding cancer proliferation. As such, there aren’t many current discoveries. My research finding the criticality of tumors is one of many ways that the field of cancer-induced angiogenesis can revolutionize our understanding of cancer proliferation. Future research in this field might be able to determine the chances of cancers to proliferate …

  • I am an ABCD: American Born Confused Desi. Living in America and growing up in an Indian household, my upbringing was enveloped in conflict between these diametrically opposite backgrounds. With different traditions, different norms, and different cultures, I was stalemated between my Indian and American backgrounds, a conflict that ignited my drive to study computer science and pursue scientific research. This newfound passion for science ultimately inspired me to resolve the long-standing conflict between my disparate backgrounds, an amalgamation that now drives me to pursue my passions.

    My house is a miniature India. Bengali songs and poetry echo through my house, accompanied by the soothing harmonium. Behind this vibrant culture and savory cuisine lies India’s mandated familial respect and strict societal values. My conservative parents curtailed my freedom and often didn’t allow me to leave the house. Retaliating against these traditional restrictions, I found freedom in coding, where only my imagination limited what I could develop. Over the years, I’ve created a plethora of programs including custom operating systems, alternative Snapchat applications,and high frequency stock trading simulators.

    Unlike the rigid structure at home, I experience the diversity and freedom of America at school. Used to a simple Bengali culture, I am astounded by the diverse melting pot of American traditions, yet perplexed by the lack of devotion to these customs. Furthermore, whereas my Bengali background was too restrictive, America was too flexible. In my extracurricular pursuits in Robotics and Science Bowl, I was given full freedom to operate, but without a guiding hand I was often lost. I learned to harness my creativity through science fairs. Through this scientific research, I am able to explore the world around me in a structured method. Ever since seventh grade, I have investigated concepts like desalination and solar panels to satiate my curiosity.

    Conflicted between worlds of concentrated traditions and diverse customs, between values of structure and function, I was in the crossfire between America and India. Self-reflecting on my newfound passions, I synthesized these mismatching cultural worlds. Through my programming pursuits and scientific research, I gained freedom from my oppressing Bengali traditions and harnessed the freedom of America through structure. I realized that I wasn’t only Indian or only American, but rather a combination of these worlds. I took the middle ground, compromising between Indian discipline and America’s opportunity. Fusing my vibrant Indian traditions and the diverse mixing pot of American culture, I finally eliminated the confusion that ruled my life.

    I am no longer an American Born Confused Desi. I now understand the roles India and America play in my life, and how irrevocably these worlds are intertwined in my heart. Through the conflict, I unearthed my passion in computer science and research. My newly unified cultural background now inspires me to pursue these passions. My Indian heritage drives me to structurally pursue my goals. America inspires me to develop unique solutions. Without either world, I am incomplete. Together, they give me the imagination and drive to tackle the world’s most complex problems through scientific research.

  • RD 2

    You can tell much about a person’s character by the programming language they use. Living in the Silicon Valley, I picked up my region’s favorite pastime, programming at age 7, writing “Hello World” programs and developing little applets. Over my 10 years coding, I’ve developed the unique habit of coding in a seamless mixture of C++ and Python. Two programming languages from different eras, with different styles, and for different audiences, Python and C++ represent my polarly opposite cultural backgrounds. Raised as a Bengali, yet living in America, I walk the line between, incorporating the best of both worlds. As the combination of programming languages gives me the tools to pursue my dreams, the synthesis of my worlds gives me the drive to achieve them.

    My home is a hodgepodge of West Bengal. My parents migrated to this country with just the clothes on their backs, knowing only their native language, Bengali. [Possible Omission and Integration ->] As a result, I was born and raised in this Bengali environment.Many evenings were spend singing Bengali songs and banging on the keys of our harmonium (piano). Yet behind the festivals and the merrymaking, was a wall of stone. My parents exacted absolute discipline, and it seemed that the only English word they knew was “study”. Everything had structure, and the freedom I experienced at school and outside was silenced once I came home. I did only the activities they felt right, and I couldn’t go out anywhere unless they approved it (which they never did). Surrounded by these I felt hampered, seemingly unable to pursue my interests or explore beyond. However, through this controlled lifestyle, I enjoyed great academic success, narrowminded as may be, and soon I learned to accept my parent’s disciplined methods of raising me.
    Here in this closed environment, I learned the ancient programming language C++. As I delved into the nuances of this programming language, I was thrilled yet deterred. It was a language based on structure, with guidelines that you could not deviate from. Even forgetting a semicolon could cause your program to crash. It reminded me much of the strict environment that surrounded me in my home, the unforgiving nature. Yet at the same time, I was empowered by the elegance of coding, and its power to create. Thus, much like my family situation, I learned to live with the structure and discipline, in peaceful coexistence.
    As I matured, I strove to pursue my interests by insistently nagging my parents. My pursuits to liberalize my life were twice renewed when I discovered Python in 9th grade. With its English-like syntax and ability to create whatever I wanted, I was finally freed. Python idealized the American Dream for me, a language with the power to discover whatever we want. In the phase of liberalizing, I abandoned C++ as my default language for Python. As I strove to expand my interests and pursuits, I enveloped myself in the world of extracurriculars and began to lose touch with the Bengali heritage of structure and function.
    It took one of my hardest challenges to align with the duality that controls me today. I was struggling with a science fair project on file compression that had enveloped all of my time. When I coded the project with Python, it was unbearably slow and couldn’t give all of the functionality I needed. I tried coding the project in C++, yet in some cases, the complexity was unbearably high. [ Rephrase]. I was stuck between the two for countless. I solved my problem by answering one question: “So are you American or Indian?” And just like that, the duality broke. I realized that I was neither American nor Indian, I was both. I returned to my project with a renewed vigor, and combined the two programming languages to success. From that moment on, I realized that just how my programming requires a blend of both languages, my character lies with both my heritages: West Bengal and America.
    It took a clash of programming languages for me to truly understand my background and heritage. In many ways, Python and C++ are synonymous with my Americanized and Indian heritages. Just how Python and C++ are now intertwined in my code,West Bengal and America have intertwined themselves in my heart. I inhabit the little overlap region between the two worlds. Together, these union of these worlds drive me to pursue my aspirations in computer science further. My Indian heritage provides structure: it reminds me of my family’s humble roots and that I must take small, simple, yet concretely defined steps to achieve my goals. Python reminds me to utilize my imagination, to dream high, and to license creative freedom when developing solutions. Without either, I am incomplete. Together, these worlds drive me to journey onward to tackle the world’s most complicated problems.

  • RD 1

    They say you can tell a lot about a person by the programming language they use. Unlike many of the programmers in this Silicon Valley, I owe my allegiance to no particular language, and [Talk About Hybrid between Python and C++] Raised as a Bengali, yet living in America, I walk the line between. The world that I see and the dreams that I pursue have
    My father came to this country with just the clothes on his back and the laptop in his bag. The only languages he knew were Bengali and PASCAL. A radical shift from his simple roots, he struggled to adjust to this newfound way of living. I was born almost immediately It doesn’t come much of a surprise that I am born and raised Bengali. Bengali was my first language, and ever since I could enunciate, I’ve been singing Rabindanath Tagore and Nazrul Islam songs and banging on the keys of our harmonium (piano). I went to festivals and pujas all dressed up in panjabis and kurtas, eating Indian sweets and performing in poetry recitals.
    Once I knew how to speak English and Bengali, I learned a third language: C++. C++, the programming language of the olden times, was a mystique to me: an arcane language filled with secret functions and . C++ is known for its emphasis on structure, and 7 year old me didn’t like it. But now, I have come to respect the humble roots that my family comes from. It helps me stay grounded in my roots and make me realize the small and steady steps that I must take to achieve my goals.
    Just outside my Bengali-infested house beckoned the freedom of America. Away from the stringent rules of my parents . It was in 7th grade when I discovered the wonder of Python in my . To me, Python idealized the American Dream. A language with the power to discover whatever we want. [Insert More About Python]. Yet, I soon realized that Python was only good for visualizing …. [Talk about how I learned to hybridize them]
    Python and C++ have intertwined themselves into my brain much like West Bengal and America are intertwined in my heart. I inhabit the little overlap region between the two worlds. Some say that being trapped between the two makes me miss the best of both worlds. “You’ve never eaten at In and Out?” “You’ve never celebrated Holi”. But in reality, I enjoy the best of both worlds. Without one I am incomplete. Together, these worlds drive me onward to tackle the world’s most complicated problems.

  • Gears. Check. Metal Plates. Check. My hands fly across the table, zooming from screws to axles to gears. From amidst the chaos, a machine rises. My fingers zooming over the keyboard, I code frantically on my computer, and with a simple “Compile” command, I breath life into my robot. The green lights stares up at me, and the robot responds to the minute movements of my joystick. I breath an audible sigh of relief, and look up to see the busy commotion in the room. Hidden in the corner of the school, in an expansive yet reclusive Every time I walk into CT-2, I am filled with a feeling of curiosity and innovation that continually drives. Hardware litters the corridor, and the familiar buzz of the bandsaw hums in my ears. I am thrown back to 9th grade, as a tiny freshman, standing among huge machines and robots that seemed larger than life. Surrounded by giants and seniors who looked too old to be in college, let alone high school, I felt out of place. <Insert Details> To this day, that first robot that we built smiles back at me from the corner of the room.

    In the back of the room hangs a whiteboard stained with the diagrams and drawings of robots past. After the seniors left my freshman year, the small yet intense club that I had immersed myself into vanished. Unaccustomed to helping run a club, I pooled together my friends to rebuild. At first, the whiteboard was covered with recruiting strategies and club promotion techniques. Our hard work began to pay off, and as people began trickling in,

    CT-2 is filled with huge arcane machines with unimaginably high prices, yet the most precious thing in the room fits in a backpack. An collection of 100 tightly bound pages, my engineering notebook reflects the ideas and thoughts that have driven my robotics projects. Coming to class

    In the very center of the room, lies a 12 foot by 12 foot field that is my battleground. Competing in the VEX Robotics Tournament for the last 3 years, I’ve helped our team reach

    As I’ve come to expect every night,, the lights in the building turn off at 5. CT-2 is where the abstract becomes reality. Surrounded by ….., my crazy ideas come to ife. The fellow inhabitans who mill about CT-2 have become my family. Even as I walk out of the building, my second home, the

  • Final Draft

    I never thought I would be fighting cancer. Yet my pursuit of understanding breast cancer detection hurled me onto the front line of research against the malignant disease. Obtaining data and guidance from professionals, I developed a unique automated breast cancer detection algorithm. This independent venture delved further into the scientific unknown than my previous science fair projects and immersed me into the world of scientific research. From its inception to final presentation at the California State Science Fair, this project was one of the most influential forces in shaping me into the scientist I am today.

    My interest in breast cancer mammography was stimulated by the misdiagnosis of my aunt’s cancer. Shocked by the pitiful state of cancer detection today, I vowed to make my own contributions in the field. I scoured through online biology and computer science courses hunting for knowledge. Through a unique mindset, I developed algorithms to detect cancerous lesions in mammograms. I encountered many problems at this deep level of research, where many concepts remain undiscovered. I spent months dedicated to this research, and by obsessively pursuing this singular goal, I soon began making novel discoveries in my field. Through research, I discovered the importance of focus and learned to tame my procrastination. The path of research was strenuous, and many times after slaving away at problems for weeks, I felt like quitting. However, with the hard work and frustration came great rewards. The thrill I experienced when making a new discovery was unparalleled and drove me to continue research.

    By presenting my project to various science fairs, I discovered the power of collaboration and iteratively improved my research. At the local science fair, judges helped bring my pr
    oject to a new level. While presenting my project’s “big picture”, I critically reflected on the flaws in my research. Using my analytical observations and judges’ advice to enhance my project, I discovered the never-ending cycle of advancement in scientific research. At the state science fair, I received invaluable advice for future routes for my research. Surrounded by the brightest minds in California, I developed a network of friends, scientists, and mentors who guide my research to this day.

    Although that specific project stopped at the California State Science Fair, I still fight against cancer. Driven by a desire to change society’s understanding of cancer, I forked my research to modelling cancer proliferation, work that I submitted to 2 research competitions, Intel STS and Siemens Competition. To this day, my state science fair souvenir pin, the final memento from my project, rests on my suit lapel. It reminds me of my potential as a scientist and the infinite world of research. I don’t think I will take it off. It means a lot to me.

  • #RD 2

    I’d never thought I’d be fighting cancer. Yet, a fortuitous breakthrough in my breast cancer detection program led to accurate predictions, and I was hurled onto the front line of research fighting against the malignant disease, cancer. Contacting various professors and obtaining data from universities, I developed an automated breast cancer detection algorithm. Unlike the many science fair projects I’ve completed in high school, this project fully immersed me into the world of scientific research. From its inception to final presentation at the California State Science Fair, my research has been one of the most influential forces in shaping me into the scientist I am today.
    My research was inspired by the misdiagnosis of my aunt’s cancer, which revealed to me pitiful state of cancer detection today. Shocked into action, I vowed to learn more and make my own contributions in the field. As I researched the nuances of breast cancer mammography, my interest piqued, and I obsessively scoured through countless computer science courses on Coursera and EdX and MIT OCW searching and learning. Having gained a sufficient base, I began my own independent work, developing algorithms to detect abnormalities in mammograms to find possible locations for a cancer. My ultimate programming challenge, I spent months iteratively designing and developing algorithms to isolate cancerous lesions. The path of research was perilous, and unaccustomed to pursuing computer science at such a deep level, where many concepts remain undiscovered, I encountered many problems. Realizing that I couldn’t overcome these obstacles without complete focus, I learned to handle procrastination and my distractions. I faced many hardships throughout this project, and at many times, after slaving away at a problem for a week, I felt the urge to quit. Yet the thrill I experienced after correctly linking my model predictions with experimental data was unparalleled and drove me to continue on researching.
    Half of being a scientist is doing the research; the other half is presenting it. After developing a sophisticated breast cancer detection, I entered the exciting science fair season. Through my local science fair, I gained exposure: talking with local professionals who helped me expand my project to a new level. When I was developing my algorithm, I was busy adjusting the minute details, but as I presented, I was able to take a step back and critically think. At the local fair, I received 1st place, and qualified for the state science fair. Reflecting back on my judge’s comments and my critical reflections, I delved further into my project and discovered the never-ending and constantly improving circular flow of research. At the state science fair, I once again presented my project, in its finality, to professionals in my field. At this event, I developed a network of friends, scientists, and mentors that exists with me today. I learned the power of collaboration, and discussing with my fellow top minds in California, I felt enlightened and empowered.
    Although my project stopped at the California State Science Fair, I still pursue cancer to this day. Still driven by a desire to change society’s understanding of cancer, I forked my project to the modelling of cancer proliferation, research that I submitted to 2 research competitions, Intel STS and Siemens Competition.
    The final memento from this research, my state science fair pin, still rests on the front left flap of my suit. It reminds me of the gift of research, and the many ways it shaped my views as a scientist. I don’t think I will take it off. It means a lot to me.

  • RD 1

    A gulp of water. Quick glance at my watch. Another gulp. Trifold poster boards line as far down the aisle as I can see. Novel engine technology. Patterns in the human genome. Scientific research of the highest caliber lurks in every nook and cranny of the auditorium for the California State Science Fair. Standing in front of my posterboard detailing breast cancer diagnosis techniques, I silently await the well dressed man with a clipboard strolling towards me, ready to judge the fruits of my 6 months of research. < Insert Reference to Pin>

    My research began as a series of completely accidental events that opened my eyes to the world of breast cancer diagnosis. The misdiagnosis of my aunt’s cancer shocked me into action against the serious pitfalls in cancer diagnosis today. Dusting off an old image recognition software that I’d coded in my free time a couple of months ago, I set off to work. Hours whizzed by researching the nuances of breast cancer mammography, and I carefully designed and developed algorithms to isolate cancerous lesions. Many weeks were spent huddled at the computer,coding into the night. I scoured through countless computer science courses on Coursera and EdX and MIT OCW searching for the perfect algorithm. Despite my persistent attacks on the subject, my software was as good at predicting cancer as a coin flip.

    The judge approaches, and I dive into the presentation. Emotion bleeds into my speech as I vicariously explain how my software eliminated the doctor from breast cancer testing. I enthusiastically describe the scientific concepts like parallax and bio-mimicry that reveal the intense research underlying my project. Self-reflecting on the experiment, I address flaws in my data-collecting procedures and discuss possible solutions. By connecting my discoveries with real-world applications, I relate the data to my goals and conclude my presentation. As the judge shakes my hand and walks away from my booth, the nervousness festering in my stomach evaporates, and a new feeling settles in: pride.

    With my interview done with, my confidence is back and I begin to talk with my fellow intellectuals. As I meander around the aisles, I learn about human tissue mechanics, heart disease sensors, and solar panels. The projects around me not only astound me, but they also inspire me. As I stand alongside my peers, I converse with them, talking about our projects and ways we might overcome obstacles in our individual experiments. As a community, we collaborate to develop our understanding of the science behind the projects.

    The California State Science Fair imbued me with a spirit of scientific discovery that lives on with me today. My fellow students have become a network of scientists that I rely upon for my research today. The lessons I learned from my judges helped me advance my project to a deeper level. In many ways, the state science fair has been defined the role of researcher and scientist that I play today.

    My science fair pin still sits on the front left flap of my suit. It reminds me of my project at the state science fair: the spirit of discovery that drove my project; the collaboration with my science fair judges that become my mentors; the creative thinking that led to my algorithms; the hours of hard work that .I don’t think I will take it off. It means a lot to me.

  • A glint of silver flashes down my arm. With my shako set, I march onto the astroturf. The stands loom in front of me, crowded with spectators and judges. The stadium lights illuminate me, as the harsh sun had done through the countless full-day Saturday rehearsals. I am on the stage, and facing the audience, this is my moment.

    No, this is our moment. I face my fellow marching band members, brought together by a passion for music. A bond forged by countless hours toiling for one unified goal, they have become my family. I feel a sense of paternal pride at my fellow flute players, who under my leadership as section leader, have improved drastically. As the drum major’s hands go up, the show begins,and I give myself away to the music.

    We find uniqueness in conformity. We wear identical uniforms, we march with similar technique, we are unique individuals who have become one. Yet ,through our music, we break this conformity and channel our inner soul. We paint an illusion from the first melodious note to the final brash statement, captivating the audience every step of the way. On the field, I realize, we make more than music. We make memories.

  • RD 1

    I drag my brush across the easel. My brushstrokes of magenta, turquoise, and scarlet blend to develop mystical shapes on the canvas. Adding the final touches, I step back to admire my work. I am not a conventional painter, per se. I don’t paint with oil pastels, colored pencils, or watercolor. I paint with code. Through programming, I use an artist’s touch, developing simple and elegant softwares. The thrill I receive from writing innovative code drives me, a passion I will pursue in college.

    To me, programming is the synthesis of logic and art. Algorithms are pure logic, simple flowcharts that have a defined set of steps without any room for errant behavior. Yet, as I program the code for this flowchart into machine code, I add the artistic touch to the lifeless algorithm. While performing my independent scientific research on breast cancer , I was once tasked with using image analysis to find possible cancerous lesions on a mammogram. Although others attempted many times before unsuccessfully, I uniquely developed the algorithm, simulating rainfall on the image to find abnormal locations. This skillful artistic manipulation of a seemingly clearcut algorithm was the major breakthrough in my novel automated breast cancer detector.

    I unleash my creativity through the absolute logical world of programming. At USC, through classes and research in computer science, I hope to flourish my understanding of computers to find new imaginative ways to tackle the world’s most complex problems.

      1. With these two digits, I can manipulate 295 exabytesa level of information beyond con. The computer is a weapon of pure power, and I am entranced with .

    [Topic Sentence Here] Without a smartphone, I was left out of the Snapchat fad, so I coded an unofficial port of Snapchat onto the PC. Once, unhappy with the performance of my stocks, I developed a high-frequency stock simulator that observed minute patterns in the prices of stocks to pick the best stocks at the right time, with profits of 5% per day.

    I have performed independent scientific research over the last two years, using computer science and applied mathematics to understand and document the interactions between tumors and the cardiovascular system for cancer diagnosis purposes. Using theoretical computer concepts like machine learning, digital image analysis, and computational differential equations, I linked mammographic images to cancerous lesions to create a novel working prototype of an automated breast cancer detector.

    Programming is more than a way of manipulating computers, for me it is a way to unleash creativity and an unique way of overcoming obstacles. At USC, I hope to learn to harness the tremendous power of computers to continue tackling the world’s most complex problems.

  • The pen may be mightier than the sword. But mightier than the pen is the computer. A machine that understands only two digits (1 and 0) yet knows more than any human can ever seek to comprehend. The computer is a weapon of pure power, and I am entranced with .

    Throughout high school, I’ve attempted to harness its power. My ventures in the field of programming are long and varied, yet with one common goal: to overcome my obstacles. Without a smartphone, I felt left out when Snapchat became the latest fad. Unphased, I developed an unofficial port of Snapchat onto the PC, and with a webcam, I could now converse with my friends on the Snapchat network. Once, fed up with how my stock picks were doing, I developed a high-frequency stock simulator, that observed minute patterns in the prices of stocks to pick the best stocks at the right time. Although I didn’t have the bandwidth or money to support the operation, that proof-of-concept nearly earned me a constant 5% growth rate per day.

    Beyond my simple independent projects, I also apply computer science in research situations. Over the last two years, I’ve been engrossed in scientific research, using the power of computer science and applied mathematics to understand the interactions between tumors and the cardiovascular system. Using machine learning, image analysis techniques, and computational differential equations, I linked mammographic images to cancerous lesions to create the first working prototype of an automated breast cancer detector.

    In college, I will pursue computer science and its practical applications with the same passion that drove me in high school. For me, programming is more than a way of instructing computers, it is a way to unleash creativity and an unique way of overcoming obstacles. At USC, I hope to gain fluency in the magnificent language of computer science to tackle the world’s most complex problems.

  • Elocutor, Dreamer, Quirky

  • Favorite food: Pecan Pie
    Favorite fictional character: Jay Gatsby
    Greatest invention of all time: X-Ray Imaging
    What do you like to do for fun? Play pickup soccer
    Role model: Elon Musk
    Favorite book: Freakonomics
    Best movie of all time: The Godfather
    Favorite musical performer/band or composer: Eminem
    Dream job: First Officer of the Starship Enterprise

  • “I play kickball. Nerds don't play kickball, right?” In denial against  the accusations of being a "nerd" and "geek" by my elementary school bullies, I buried my inner nerd away But nothing can be hidden forever. In high school, I channeled my inner nerd and discovered that being a nerd wasn't about dressing poorly and being  socially awkward. Rather, through my “nerdy” extracurricular activities , I learned it involved expressing  passion and curiosity about science. 
    
    Have you ever used Wikipedia as a textbook? I do for Science Bowl, where I tackle abstruse science trivia questions from DNA replication to quantum states in stars. Participating in this activity,I bond with my fellow high-school scientists, satiate my thirst for knowledge, and expand the breadth of my understanding of science.
    
    Through research, I scientifically explore the world around me. Over the past 6 years, my science fair projects have evolved from physical hardware projects on desalination and sprinkler optimization to researching theoretical mathematical projects like data compression and cancer detection. Through the simple act of scientifically investigating a problem, I discover and find new pathways, delving into the world of science.

    Science Bowl and my scientific research have changed my perceptions of being a nerd. As a nerd, I channel my scientific passion, an innate characteristic that fundamentally makes me unique. I have, always will be, and am proud to be a nerd.

  • I play kickball. Nerds don’t play kickball, right?

    Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words can only make me cry. As an ambitious toddler, words like “nerd” and “geek” were often hurled at me with malice. Whether bullies at school or simple students fed up with my passion for science, I felt the brunt of these words everyday as a kid. Closing up my passion, I drove myself away from these traditionally scientific disciplines . The truth is I am a geek. I’m a nerd. But above both of these, I’m a scientist. I am an self-proclaimed Linux geek, collecting minute trivia on the most misunderstood operating system.I am a programming nerd: deftly coding up new applications whenever time allows.As a nerd, I tweak with programming languages and code technical knowhow to develop the next Snapchat app, high frequency stock traders, or whatever my whimsical imagination leads me to. Together, my hunger for knowledge about computers and my drive to use this knowledge evolves me beyond the simple classifications of geek and nerd into my true form: a scientist

    My computer is installed with operating systems that most people have never heard of. I eagerly read blogs about the latest operating systems and then go to r

    Reading Wikipedia articles on these subjects for fun, I leapfrog around these pages, delving into the miniscule world quantum physics or the astronomical worlds or. For me, geekiness isn’t a trait; it is a style of life. Although I am extremely passionate about a couple subjects (ask me about Linux, and you’ll learn more than you’d ever wanted to know), I carry this hunger for knowledge wherever I go. In classes, I am the one hyper kid in the back, always asking the most abstruse questions, hoping to gather all the information I can.

    I am an devout programming nerd. Ever since learning my first programming language at age 7, I’ve been on a roll, learning and utilizing these languages to cook up everything that’s been in my imagination. In reality, actually though, I justO

    I used to try hiding my nerdiness ipedia articles on these subjects for fun,

    I used to try hiding my nerdiness and geekiness as a kid. But lets face it, I’m the biggest nerd there is. I express my geeky desire for information through science bowl. I express my inner nerd through programming. Together, these accentuate my quirky passions for science. Indeed, this hunger for knowledge and desire to implement this knowledge shape me into the scientist I am today. I now accept that I’m a nerd: one that plays kickball nonetheless.

  • RD 3

    Members of the Nobel Committee,

    I am ecstatic to be here, surrounded by the brightest minds in the world, to receive the Nobel Prize for my breakthroughs in the field of computer cryptography. As a child, I was obsessed with tackling society’s problems. Through my science fair research, I pursued the fields of desalination, solar panel optimization , and breast cancer detection. Although I didn’t have the knowledge to make severe dents in these fields, I was introduced to the world of research that brought me here today.

    Ever curious by this world of computer science, I pursued it at USC, furthering my studies with a Masters degree and a PhD in cryptography. Now equipped with knowledge, I pursued the world of research, securing a position at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. I became obsessed with developing a new, more secure encryption algorithm to improve worldwide security. The path of research was perilous, and many times, I felt like quitting, but after years of hard work, I finally developed the first mathematically proven unbreakable cipher.

    As a kid, I had one goal: change the world. Standing in front of the Nobel Committee today, amongst the most distinguished members of society, I realize my dream has come true. I accept this prize, and would like to express profound gratitude to my family, my computer science professors , mentors, and fellow researchers who have helped me make this world a better place one step at a time.

  • Rough Draft 2

    Members of the Nobel Committee, Fellow laureates,

    I am ecstatic to be here with today to receive the Nobel Prize for Computer Science for my research in cryptography. Passionate about computer science ever since I was a little kid, studying at the University of Southern California, I gained knowledge to pursue my dreams. There at the Viterbi School of Englineering, I learned and acquired invaluable research experience that prepared me for my work in the world of computer science research.

    My passion for computer science ignited, I completed my masters degree, exploring the nuances of cryptography. Before I knew it, I was a Doctor of Science, completing my PhD in my niche of numerical cryptography. I secured a research position at the largest technology corporation, ready to explore. As I explored the morphing field of cryptology, I discovered novel methods of encryption, ultimately leading to my breakthrough in the field that brings me here in front of the Nobel committee.

    As a high schooler , I had one dream: change the world. With my undergraduate degree at USC and graduate studies in computer science, I received the toolkit required to achieve my dream. Indeed, it was my passion for computer science and this stellar education that allowed me to develop the first mathematically proven unbreakable cipher. Today, I accept this Nobel Prize with profound gratitude on behalf of my computer science teachers, mentors, and fellow researchers who helped me make my dream come true.
    Thank you.

  • I am ecstatic to be here with today to receive the Nobel Prize for Computer Science. I owe this award to many factors, my family, my supporting research environment, but most of all my undergraduate university, which immersed me into this world of computer science that I now rule today.
    
    Ever since high school, I have been obsessed with changing the world through computer science, whether through creating a viral program like Facebook and Google or developing the next unbreakable cryptography cipher.While completing my engineering degree at the University of Southern California, I received this extensive knowledge that prepared me for my work in the world of research. 
    
    I went on to complete my masters degree in computer science, fueling my passion for knowledge in the field of computer science. Studying for a PhD degree in my particular specialization, I researched attempting to discover something new in this extensive field, and after years of work, became a doctor of computer science. Finally, after much effort, I Immediately secured a research position at one of the major technology corporations of the time, ready to explore. Here, I thrived, constantly researching this ever-morphing field, ultimately leading to the stupendous breakthrough that brings me here in front of the Nobel committee. 
    
    I walked out of USC knowing only one thing. I was here to change the world, and now I had the tools to achieve it. The knowledge I received at USC drove me into computer science, into the wonderful world of research, and has ultimately led to this prize that I now accept with profound gratitude on behalf of my fellow computer science researchers and budding engineers today.
  • Yale reminds me of Hogwarts. Within its elegant architecture, I find a homely and comforting environment I can excel in. “Advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic”, and I hope to join Yale’s cutting-edge Computer Science program.In particular,Yale’s research in probabilistic distributed computing captivates me. Yale is my Hogwarts; on campus, in clubs, in classes, and in research, I see magic everywhere at Yale, ready for me to discover.

  • Getting into the Hogwarts School of Wizardry was my childhood dream. Although my acceptance letter never arrived, I find resemblances in Yale’s landscape and academia remind me of the Yale reminds me of Hogwarts, with its elegant castles and mansions that populate the campus. Sitting in a residential I feel at home I will recreate Gryffindor and Slytherin through. Most of all, at Yale, I find magical potential. Surrounded by students who

  • ale reminds me of Hogwarts. With its elegant castles and mansions, a homely and comforting environment I can excel in. I will fit right into Yale’s Quidditch team, and . Although Yale doesn’t offer bachelors degrees in wizardry, “advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic”, and I hope to pursue computer science research, on the cutting edge of discovery. I am entranced by Professor Aspnes’s research in probabilistic discrete computing, and I hope to pursue similar projects here. Yale is my Hogwarts: a magestic manifestation of magic and technology where I can unleash my creativity. I see magic everywhere, ready for me to explore.

  • Decoding real-life problems using math and code stimulates me. I mathematically model cancer proliferation and perform high-frequency stock trading through software machine learning. I hope to continue these pursuits at Yale.

  • I enjoy applying mathematics and computer science to real world problems. I’ve mathematically modelled cancer proliferation and performed high-frequency stock trading through math and code. The challenge of looking at problems mathematically stimulates me, and I hope to continue doing so at Yale.

  • Rank 40/62. My robot was scrap metal,severely outclassed in competition. Infuriated by the loss, I toiled over my robot, relentlessly striving for perfection. The next competition was a fairy tale: an underdog robot rallying back to win it all.

  • Science says that smiling requires less energy than frowning. Call me lazy, but I am always smiling. I banish my problems with my endless supply of corny jokes and an “win it all” attitude, a mindset I will bring to Yale .

  • My strokes and lines melt together on my sketchpad. I’m convinced this painting will surpass the Mona Lisa. My friend’s voice jars me, “You drew a stick figure?” Quickly hiding my portrait from my friend, I resolve to draw better next time.

  • My strokes and lines melt together on my sketchpad. I was convinced that this painting would surpass the Mona Lisa.”You drew a stick figure?” My friend’s voice jars me from my illusion, and I quickly hide my simplistic portrait from my friend. Next time, I’ll draw better.

  • Harvard Essay Verbatim

  • Adapt This Prompt

    I’ve hit a wall. Scanning research articles and my code for weeks hasn’t made any headway, yet the algorithm seems tantalizingly close. I reflect upon the transformation of my simple mammogram processing research into automated breast cancer detection. Yet, one key aspect of my research, detecting irregularities, still eludes me. The solution strikes 4,000 ft up a mountain, miles away from the technology that propels my research.

    Kneeling down by a creek to quench my thirst, a sight catches my eye. In my peripherals, rainfall trickles through the dirt and accumulates on the surface. Racing with ideas, I theorize that simulated rainfall on a system would accumulate near the cancerous abnormalities. Small observations like these trigger my best inspirations. At Caltech, I will work with my fellow students to find simple solutions for the complex problems I encounter in class and research.

    With only pen and notepad, I flesh out the rainfall idea into a practical abnormality detector. Borrowing algorithms from my EdX and Coursera data analysis courses, I create a prototype of the rainfall algorithm, which is slow and inefficient. Utilizing a design review I learned from robotics, I repetitively optimize the code, and explore alternative algorithms to enhance my design. At Caltech, professors of applied mathematics and other scientific disciplines will teach me new statistical analysis techniques to further enhance the ideas that I derive.

    Hunched over a laptop, furiously typing code for hours, my research comes to life. I design simulations and experiments to test whether the problem is fixed. Fetching a few abnormal cancerous images, my detection algorithm boots up, and the test begins. “30% complete.” Anxiety claws at me. “60%” . Nervousness racks my body, and the progress counter seems to slow down. “100%”. Finally, the program exits, and I quickly scan the results. One line pops out “Cancer status: positive; Type: Abnormal Lesion.” I leap up out of my chair in excitement and celebrate the success of my algorithm.The significance of my success hits me.I am no longer reading the book of science. I am writing it.

    Research drives me to discover and pursue society’s problems. My enthusiasm for research will bleed into my peers at Caltech, and together we will discuss problem sets and our endeavors outside of classes. I will frequent the Annenburg Center to glean knowledge from my esteemed professors. As I brainstorm answers to my research questions sitting next to the turtle pond, perhaps the sight of a turtle poking its head above a lily will inspire a solution. Caltech’s academic rigor and supportive family will best prepare me for my future in graduate school and research beyond. In ten years, with my knowledge in mathematics from Caltech, I hope to be tackling the world’s problems and making a difference.

  • My interest lie in applying CS+Math to other departments
    —Cornell’s expansive program will help me explore my interests

    CS-Based
    -Computation Biology
    -Rigorous Program

    Cornell’s campus takes my breath away. I’ve hope to explore the magnificent lands around Ithaca, constantly delving for more inspiration.

    Your school inspires me, because it challenges students in an insightful and meaningful way, and because, even in the middle of a big city, it’s one of warmest and most thoughtful campuses I have ever visited.

  • “I am on a mobius strip. I keep walking around in circles, and the path is endless. I keep searching for an exit, but my mental strength constantly weakens, sapped of resolve.”

    My cancer diagnosis research has hit a wall. A crucial surface area algorithm has bottlenecked my cancer simulation, preventing any further development. For 4 weeks, I studied research articles, tested various algorithms, and tenaciously wrote code, all to no avail.  My determination was flagging, and today was destined to be another fruitless search. In this darkest hour, I discovered the beauty of research. Harnessing science's innate creativity, I developed connections between Legos and tumors to optimize cancer diagnosis. 
    
    My research was sparked by the false-positive diagnosis of my aunt's cancer. Mentally and medically destroyed by a disease she didn't possess, der misdiagnosis inspired me to pursue cancer diagnosis. Hungering for knowledge, I studied several computation biology and data analysis courses on Coursera, EdX, and MIT OCW . I independently sought out to develop a novel mathematical model  of interactions between cardiovascular systems and tumors to diagnose cancer criticality. Undiscovered concepts and puzzling problems riddled my path of research. Although I had managed to persevere through most of the barriers, the calculation of cellular surface area had me stumped. My initial algorithm was incredibly slow, requiring redesign. Developing and testing new algorithms all led to the same inefficiency. Mathematical biology textbooks and research journals lay strewn on my desk, all without solutions. Having exhausted every resource available to me, I was back at square one. I began having doubts and and my enthusiasm dwindled.
    
    As it turned out, I was searching in the wrong place. My solution came as I built a Lego set with my toddler cousin. My interest piqued when she attempted to count the number of Legos in the tower, but mistakenly counted the number of sides. Laughing, I corrected her, when it hit me like a freight train. By visualizing a cancerous cell as a composition of Lego-like structures, I could develop a new surface area algorithm. For the first time in weeks, I felt driven by purpose. Through the fog of my elation, I realized that I was no longer reading the book of science; I was 

    writing it.

    My journey pursuing cancer diagnosis has shaped my life in many ways. Research gifted me a high level of knowledge about dynamical mathematical models, cancerous biochemical interactions, and computer-based analyses. The high-level problems taught me the importance of focus and whittled away my procrastination. Most of all, research gave me the gift of creativity: the ability to look at problems through unique perspectives. It still amazes me how Legos, a simple childrens’ toy, helped me develop an innovative surface area algorithm. My final major roadblock gone, my simulation unveiled a new view on cancer criticality, research I submitted to Intel STS and the Siemens Research Competition, pending publication. I encounter new obstacles more challenging and confounding than ever, but I conquer them with my imagination. In research, school, and life, I tackle my problems with diligence, perseverance, and most importantly, panache.

    (517 words)

  • “I keep walking, but the path is endless. I am on a mobius strip, walking around in circles, without escape. I shall keep searching, but my mental strength constantly weakens, sapped of resolve.”
    My cancer diagnosis research has hit a wall. A crucial surface area algorithm has bottlenecked my cancer simulation, preventing any further development. For 4 weeks, I’d studied research articles, tested various algorithms, and tenaciously wrote code, all to no avail. My determination was flagging, and today was destined to be another fruitless search.In my darkest hour before the dawn, I discovered the beauty of research. Harnessing the power of creativity in research, I developed connections between Legos and tumors to optimize cancer diagnosis.
    My research was sparked by the false-positive diagnosis of my aunt’s cancer. Destroyed by a disease she didn’t possess, Her misdiagnosis inspired me to pursue cancer diagnosis. Hungering for knowledge, I studied several computation biology and data analysis courses on Coursera, EdX, and MIT OCW . Several local professors rejected my research proposal for their lab, so I independently sought out to develop a novel mathematical model of interactions between cardiovascular systems and tumors to diagnose cancer criticality. Undiscovered concepts and puzzling problems riddled my path of research. Although I had managed to persevere through most of the barriers, the calculation of cellular surface area had me stumped. My initial algorithm was incredibly slow, requiring redesign. Developing and testing new algorithms all led to the same inefficiency. Mathematical biology textbooks and research journals lay strewn on my desk, all without solutions. Having exhausted every resource available to me, I was back at square one, and I began having doubts and and my drive began to dwindle.
    As it turned out,research articles and programming references didn’t have the answers. My solution came as I built a Lego set with my toddler cousin. My interest piqued when she attempted to count the number of Legos in the tower, but mistakenly counted the number of sides. Laughing, I corrected her, when it hit me like a freight train. By visualizing a cancerous cell as a composition of Lego-like structures, I could develop a new surface area algorithm. For the first time in weeks, I feel driven by purpose. Through the fog of my elation, I realize that I am no longer reading the book of science; I am writing it.
    My journey pursuing cancer diagnosis has shaped my life in many ways. Research gifted me a high level of knowledge about dynamical mathematical models, cancerous biochemical interactions, and computer-based analyses. The high-level problems taught me the importance of focus and whittled away my procrastination. Most of all, research gave me the gift of creativity: the ability to look at problems through unique perspectives. It still amazes me how Legos, a simple childrens’ toy, helped me diagnose cancer criticality, research I submitted to Intel STS and the Siemens Research Competition, pending publication. I encounter new obstacles more challenging and confounding than ever, but I conquer them with my imagination. In research, school, and life, I tackle my problems with diligence, perseverance, and most importantly, panache.

    (517 words)

  • RD 2

    “Day 27:
    I keep walking, but the path is endless. I am on a mobius strip, walking around in circles, without escape. I shall keep searching, but my mental strength constantly weakens, sapped of resolve.”

    My mathematical research on cancer diagnosis has hit a wall. A crucial surface area algorithm in my cancer simulation was unbearably slow, preventing any further development. Mathematical biology textbooks lay strewn on my desk, searching for new algorithms to eliminate this plague that invaded my project. My determination was flagging, and today seemed to be no different. Another fruitless search, another step further into this dismal pit I’ve dug myself into. But today, I abandoned the literature: the textbooks, research articles, my algorithms. Relying solely on the nuances of my imagination, I related Legos and tumors to optimize cancer diagnosis.
    My research was sparked by the false-positive diagnosis of my aunt’s cancer. Barraged by cancer inhibiting medications, she was destroyed by a disease she didn’t possess. Her misdiagnosis inspired me to pursue cancer diagnostic research. Hungering for any knowledge on the subject, I studied several courses on Coursera, EdX, and MIT OCW searching and learning. <Add professors> Through my independent research, I developed a novel mathematical model of interactions between the cardiovascular system and tumors to diagnose cancer criticality.

     Undiscovered concepts and puzzling problems riddled my path of research.  One of the most momentous problems tracking the movement of cancer in my research required the calculation of cellular surface area. My initial algorithm was flawed, and required a complete redesign. Unfazed, I labored on, researching and testing different algorithms, and reading contemporary research articles. Yet, two weeks have passed, but the negative results still pile up and my drive begins to dwindle.
    
    A lego thrown at me distracts me from the many flashing red errors on my computer. Snapping out of my coding daze, I notice my cousin building a Lego tower. Welcoming a distraction from my gloomy research, I join her construction. My interest is piqued when she attempts to count the number of Legos in the tower, but mistakenly counts the number of sides. Laughing, I correct her, when it hits me like a freight train. By visualizing a cancerous cell as a composition of Lego-like structures, I develop a new surface area algorithm. For the first time in weeks, I feel driven by purpose.My algorithm is successful, and through the fog of elation, I realize that I am no longer reading the book of science; I am writing it.
    Through my pursuit, I have unearthed the significance of imagination. Studying and developing in an environment where much is undiscovered, to make progress and make new developments requires an unique perspective. Research gifted me a high level of knowledge about dynamical mathematical models, cancerous biochemical interactions, and computer-based analyses. Through the intensity of problems, I discovered the importance of focus and learned to tame my procrastination. But most of all, research gave me the gift of creativity: the ability to look at problems through unique perspectives. It still amazes me how Legos, a simple childrens’ toy, helped me diagnose cancer criticality, research I submitted to Intel STS and the Siemens Research Competition, pending publication. 

    I encounter new obstacles more challenging and confounding than ever, but I conquer them with my imagination. In research, school, and life, I tackle my problems with diligence, perseverance, and most importantly, panache.

  • Beyond my window, a sheet of rain masks the outside. I sit on my bed, thinking of ideas to overcome this new problem, but can’t put ideas to paper. I was wiped out, running on empty, and soon succumbed to my tiredness. Performing calculations into the rainy night, my computer contently whirs, permeating the melodic drumbeats of the rain. Deep in my subconscious, nature and my research coalesce into one seemingly unified being.

    There was a whispering in the beautiful sunny morning weather. The sky was like a dome of plasma-blue, and the clouds drifted under the gleaming disc of sun.

    My interest in breast cancer mammography was stimulated by the misdiagnosis of my aunt’s cancer. Shocked by the pitiful state of cancer detection today, I vowed to make my own contributions in the field. I scoured through online biology and computer science courses hunting for knowledge. Through a unique mindset, I developed algorithms to detect cancerous lesions in mammograms.

    At first, a tapping on the window, then a deluge. The distinct clink-clink of raindrops on the roof melded into a constant whir, as the water drenched the landscape. The gray clouds extinguished the passionate light of the molten-gold sun, leaving only darkness and despair.

    My journey in mathematical modelling of blood vessels in cancer has taken me through many strange avenues. Tracking the movement of cancer required the calculation of cellular surface area. My initial software was unbearably slow, a seemingly simple case of inefficient code. Further testing revealed that the algorithm was flawed, and required a complete redesign. Unfazed, I labored on, researching and testing different algorithms, and reading contemporary research articles. Yet, two weeks have passed, but the negative results still pile up and my drive begins to dwindle.

    As the rain subsided, a silent mist drifted mist-like towards the molten-gold sun. The rain eroded the outer shell of the landscape, exposing a new unique inner beauty.

    Inspiration strikes on a play-date with my 6 year old cousin. Trying to count her Legos, instead she accidentally counts the sides. Immediately, I theorize that calculating the surface area like counting sides of Legos would speed up the algorithm. A hectic coding session finalizes and confirms the result. “Completion Time: 1.2 minutes”. Away from the technology that drives my research, reflections and inspirations help me overcome the challenges.

    A glittering rainbow shines over the sky, the only remnants from the ravaging rainstorm. Yet on the horizon, dark clouds loom, chaos ready to strike.

    Research continues to throw curveballs at me, but I don’t give up. When the challenge seems insurmountable, I remember the reason I research: beyond the obstacle lies a goal worth fighting for.

  • “Scientific research is a human endeavor. The choices of topics that we research are based on our biases, our beliefs, and what we bring: our cultures and our families. The kinds of problems that people put their talents to solving depends on their values.” -Dr. Clifton Poodry. How has your own background influenced the types of problems you want to solve?

  • In a world where technology continually adapts and progresses, Harvey Mudd College expects that our students will be aware of the impact of their work on society. How would you use new advances to improve your life and/or the lives of those around you? Describe your idea and its potential impact. Feel free to be as creative or as practical as you like.

  • What is one thing we won’t know about you after reading your application that you haven’t already reported in the Common Application “Additional Information” section?

  • Choose this prompt, talk about research

  • Quotes:

    ALice in Wonderland : “I can’t go back to yesterday because I was a different person then.”

  • “I know not all that may be coming, but be it what it will, I’ll go to it laughing.”

  • Not all those who wander are lost;

  • “Most men and women will grow up to love their servitude and will never dream of revolution.” —Brave New World (Amber D.)

  • I began this research as an extension of my previous work in breast cancer modelling. While competing at the California State Science Fair, a judge helped me make the connection between my work and cancer angiogenesis, as a logical step to continue my research. I studied and found interest in the topic, and I independently developed a research question in the field to pursue.

  • The main procedure in my research was developing a successful mathematical model of the system at hand. Learning from mathematical courses in computational biology, I developed my own model and derived a discretized version of the model, all on my own accord. Although many of my models are common and derivative, I didn’t receive help from any single source that is noteworthy.

  • In order to test my mathematical model, I needed to develop an environment that could simulate the partial differential equations. I wrote an program in C++ to code this, with all algorithms developed by myself or derived from open-source alternatives. For my Partial Differential Equation solver in my simulation, I got help from Dr. Chaudhuri in the theory, although I implemented it myself.

  • I set up all the experiments on the computer and conducted them all by myself.I developed a data extraction algorithm that hooked into my simulation to collect extensive data while the simulation ran. Using Microsoft Excel and various Python plotting libraries, I created visual representations of this data for future and data analysis.

  • To analyze data, I used two main methods of comparison. Firstly, I compared the data gathered from different runs together to analyze the effect of condition shifting (sensitivity analysis) on the model, gathering the influence of each input in the system. Secondly, I manipulated the variables to match physical experimental data to develop a practical framework model.

  • I came to my conclusions primarily by myself. I compared my results with those of other experimenters to confirm the validity of my model. With the help of my father, I explored possible further research ventures and potential real-world applications of my discoveries. He helped me develop my reverse parallax algorithm, but I made my theoretical conclusions by myself.

  • While speaking with a college representative of the University of Pennsylvania, I learned the hands-on nature. As I’ve discovered through labs in high school and my research, I learn best when I work hands on.

    I’ve always had one goal: change the world. This goal has inspired me to

    Robotics

    Research on Computational Biology and Bioinformatics — The work of professors at the University of Pennsylvania

    Summer Undergraduate Research in Engineering (SURE) — Hope to expand my horizons

    Penn Research in Machine Learning (PRiML)

    • #This One

      Harvard Essay Verbatim

    • This One

      Harvard Essay

      Change to emphasize this quote

    {"cards":[{"_id":"46a7776f98be5bc1ea000045","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":372955,"position":1,"parentId":null,"content":"#College Essays \n"},{"_id":"471c8d916716334e8300002b","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":417169,"position":0.25,"parentId":"46a7776f98be5bc1ea000045","content":"#Random Essays"},{"_id":"471c8e046716334e8300002c","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":417010,"position":1,"parentId":"471c8d916716334e8300002b","content":"Yup, I don't know whether these match a prompt, so for now, they live here\n"},{"_id":"4a921c679f5f5d190100004b","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":842520,"position":0.5,"parentId":"471c8e046716334e8300002c","content":"##Robotics\nRobotics Essay\n\n\"We're two inches over?\". A shout permeates the shallow pre-competition peace that had settled into the room. People looked up from packing all our robotics hardware tools towards the center of commotion. A ruler on the side of our robot indicated that our robot was 20 inches long, above the 18 inch rule, with no room left to compress. \n\nWe hold a little impromptu meeting to discuss this roadblock only 16 hours before competition started Saturday morning. The discussion is spaced with long breaks as the truth hits us: if we don't completely re-engineer this robot by sunrise, we face disqualification. \n\nAll of a sudden, the \n"},{"_id":"471c8eb66716334e8300002d","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":837781,"position":1,"parentId":"471c8e046716334e8300002c","content":"##Hiking\n\n\"Wait, that's it!\" The distant rumbling of a mudslide snapped me out of my euphoria. \"We should get a move on before the storm hits us\". The wind rustles the dirt, creating a whirlpool on the hill in front of us. Trudging up a hill that seems more like a vertical wall, I inch closer and closer to the peak of the mountain. With great effort, I clamber to the top. A glorious sunset greets me from the top of El Diablo, a brutal 6000 ft peak which took me four hours to summit. \n\nBut my mind was on other things. For days, I had been stuck on an efficient algorithm to dynamically calculate the surface area of cells as they migrate from tumors, a key base of my project to model cancer angiogenesis. My previous methodology was iterative, and thus incredibly slow. To find a better way to address this issue, I looked through many books, scoured the internet, all to no avail, the provided algorithms giving only marginal increases in speed and efficiency.\n\n\n\nThe solution struck me on the trek up Mount Diablo, sparked by a trickle of running water. If I simulated a rainfall on the cellular system, then I could measure the places where the water dissolves into the cell to find the surface area. By simulating rainfall, I could parallelize the task, and complete it much faster. I hurried home to code the new algorithm, and to my great relief, my simulation was faster than ever before. The project was up and running again!\n\nHiking is my way of relaxing, giving me time to think about problems, and to allow me to explore the world around me.As strenuous and tolling on the body as hiking can get, it is an escape for me. All too caught up in the school world, surrounded by AP teachers who throw homework and stress upon students, hiking is as far away from that as I can get. \n\nI am at the crossroads of two worlds, nature and technology. From nature, I gather inspiration and awareness. The simplest thing like a water trickle or a sunflower turning towards the sun propels me to explore new questions and try new methods. Technology gives me the means of doing so. As an avid coder, I dabble in the arts of C++, Python, Java, and many more languages. My proficiency at coding and algorithm development have allowed me to apply my methods and ideas to real life Three of my science fair projects were inspired by nature, and I owe much of my current research project to these simple things I observe. Yet, at heart, I am a coder, developing complex solutions for the many problems that I tackle, not limited to high-frequency stock trading and breast cancer detection. \n\n I hope to use my computer acumen to further my future research in college and beyond. Yet, should I be stuck on a particular problem, I can follow a simple dirt trail to the heart of nature.Here, away from the stresses of society, I can relax, meditate on problems, and draw inspiration from the great world that we inhabit."},{"_id":"46a7ad2e98be5bc1ea000064","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":808608,"position":0.5,"parentId":"46a7776f98be5bc1ea000045","content":"#Common Application"},{"_id":"46a7ad8998be5bc1ea000065","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":373023,"position":1,"parentId":"46a7ad2e98be5bc1ea000064","content":"##Background\n\nSome students have a background or story that is so central to their identity that they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story."},{"_id":"4d838fa1ca2b7a7a4900012d","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1298235,"position":1,"parentId":"46a7ad8998be5bc1ea000065","content":"Minor Brainstorm\n\n-How I'm so tall in India\n\n-Set scene in Indiar\n\n-Talk about discomfort in India\n\n- Overall moral of the story -- I feel tall in india\n\n\"The doors are higher here in America\"\n\nI realize what I am fighting for: \n\nI realize why I fight on: to raise the doors in India; to create opportunity so that we may continue\n\nTypical essay structure -- \n\nIntroduction to India\n\nTalk about Discomfort in India\n\nTalk about Where Family Came from\n\nTalk about What I have done/ Where I want to go.\n\n\n\nI am 6'1''. In India, I am 5'6''. Its not due to local fluctuations in gravity, but rather the . This is how I felt, crammed into a corner of the local Saraswati Express, heading for my dad's hometown. The smells of local sweets filled my nose. \"Sorry. Excuse Me\". Climbing over people and luggage, I make my way to Seat 55D, and plop my backpack down , ready to . Staring out the window \n\nI feel stares piercing into me; my fellow Bengali passengers looking at me as if I am some kind of alien. Truth is, in many ways, I am an alien. I am an American Born Confused Desi, born into the worlds of Indian and American tradition, but belonging to none."},{"_id":"46a7bd6798be5bc1ea000066","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":373025,"position":2,"parentId":"46a7ad2e98be5bc1ea000064","content":"##Failure\nRecount an incident or time when you experienced failure. How did it affect you, and what lessons did you learn?"},{"_id":"476b3c313ecc361e9e000094","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":452662,"position":1,"parentId":"46a7bd6798be5bc1ea000066","content":"(Basic Essay Outline)\n\nI started scientific research, but it never worked. I got really dejected, but in my lowest time, I chose to re-evaluate the situation, and found the solution.\n\n(End Outline)\n\nThe Greeks had Nike. The Romans had Fortuna. Both were omniscient and omnipotent goddesses who, from their royal seats, blessed the lives of heroes, commoners, and the like. Yet, along with their culture and civilization, both were crushed under the test of time. Growing up reading the ancient myths, and later delving into the works of Homer, Euclid, and Aristotle, I had always assumed that my god of luck (if I even had one) would resemble those. It took me months of dejection to realize that my luck angel was just a \n\nI set off on my journey of research with a grand cause in mind: using cancer angiogenesis simulations to extrapolate the mechanisms through which cancer initially forms. With the help of my colleague"},{"_id":"4abafb7abe398fc35900004f","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":860639,"position":2,"parentId":"46a7bd6798be5bc1ea000066","content":"\"Time to completion: 1000 minutes\" At this point, the lines of code are probably burned into my brain. For the last 2 weeks, I'd been stuck on developing an optimized surface area algorithm, a major obstacle in the mathematical research on cancer modelling I'd been doing. In the peripherals of my vision, I see the red lights on my alarm clock reading 12:00. I want to keep searching for an algorithm that will put my research back on track, but my body succumbs to the sleep. My eyes doze off as my laptop whirs in the background, performing computations into the night.\n\nMy life is research. Ever since 7th grade, I've been doing science fair projects, which eventually segued into scientific research. Over the last year, I've been engrossed in studying and mathematically modelling cancer proliferation. Evolving from a simple image project, into breast cancer detection, my project on cancer proliferation now focuses on cancer angiogenesis, the spread of blood vessels to feed the tumor. In order to track the cells in the environment, I had to log the surface areas of the cells, but my algorithm for doing so was very inefficient.\n\nIt had started as a small problem. Initially, the problem seemed to be a simple case of optimizing the code and boosting performance, a fix that would have taken less than 30 minutes. However, tests showed us that the problems were manifested beyond inefficient code, and I would need to develop a new algorithm to tackle the problem. Over the next day, I threw my entire arsenal at it, all to no avail, giving only marginal benefits. For the next week, day and night, I read scientific journals to find how contemporary scientists dealt with the issue, but none properly worked with my situation. I rewrote my entire code in two different languages to optimize it further, all to no avail. I had mentally worn myself out, and the drive to continue slowly declined. I questioned myself, and almost quit on my projects. My productivity declined, and for a while, it seemed that I had hit an unsurmountable hill. Until a lego hit me in the head.\n\nThe alarm clock didn't wake me up that morning, it was my rambunctious cousin. Up since the crack of dawn, he was playing with whatever toys he could lay his hands on, all Legos. As the whirring of my laptop came back into focus, I notice my cousin counting his Lego blocks. Although trying to count the number of blocks, he was actually counting the number of sides. That's when it hit me. If I modelled the cells as a collection of Legos, I could easily calculate the surface area of the cells. 10 minutes of furious coding later, I had finally come up with a usable version of the surface area algorithm. \n\n\"Time to completion: 1.2 minutes\". Sharing a well-deserved ice-cream sandwich with my cousin that afternoon, I reflect back on the last two weeks that nearly derailed my research project. Although those two weeks seemed like a waste of time, in actuality, they helped me develop my knowledge of cancer angiogenesis and computer algorithms, and advanced me to a new stage in my research. My research will continue to throw curveballs at me that will be seemingly impossible, but I will struggle on. I might want to cease, but I will never quit. For now I know that on the other side of the hill of whatever problem my research throws at me, is a goal worth laboring for."},{"_id":"46a7be2498be5bc1ea000067","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":373027,"position":3,"parentId":"46a7ad2e98be5bc1ea000064","content":"##Challenging Beliefs\nReflect on a time when you challenged a belief or idea. What prompted you to act? Would you make the same decision again?\n"},{"_id":"46a7be8c98be5bc1ea000068","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":887294,"position":4,"parentId":"46a7ad2e98be5bc1ea000064","content":"##Environment\nDescribe a place or environment where you are perfectly content. What do you do or experience there, and why is it meaningful to you?"},{"_id":"4e07faee258ae903b500010a","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1379756,"position":0.0625,"parentId":"46a7be8c98be5bc1ea000068","content":"##FD 2\n\nThe shadowy evening quickly overwhelms the final traces of the shimmering dusk.Worn out from years of use, my back porch door creaks open. Leaving my stress at the door, I step into a new world. The pitch-black darkness surprises me, and the stars scattered around the night sky slowly come into focus. Surrounded by the beauty of nature, I snuggle into a plastic chair in the middle of my backyard, and meditate in solitude. Away from the constant stress of my academia, I reflect upon what I learned today and discover myself.\n\nAt school, AP classes bombard me with endless lectures. On this battleground, abstruse details are fired at me like machine gun fire. Self-study methods I developed while pursuing college-level mathematics are overwhelmed by the volume of knowledge I must process every day. Finding the big picture is nigh impossible with PowerPoint lectures chockfull of details. Swamped by knowledge, the \"breaks\" between classes offer no relief from the onslaught. Here in my backyard though, I cope with my overflow of knowledge. Beneath the starry sky, I review what I was taught in the day, make connections, and truly learn. \n\nMy backyard is my second classroom. Here, I am no longer the student, but rather the teacher. My plastic chair is my lectern. I lecture to the stars to review the material imparted to me during the day. In my imagination, my classroom isn't a field of weeds, but a class packed with eager students. I use simple terms to explain the complex concepts in my lecture to heighten my understanding of the topic. Borrowing from teaching methods I learned through tutoring and advising science fair projects, I make connections between this new material and examples to develop understanding. Tonight, I shall demystify today’s convoluted AP Biology lecture on cellular biology. \n\n“Let's talk about cellular interactions with its environment.” As I lecture, my speech instincts subconsciously kick in, with overemphasized hand gestures and voice modulation. The thunder of my voice echos around the neighborhood, when I emphasize important concepts like cell compartmentalization. My voice decreases to a dull roar as I detail its many aspects. I throw in tidbits from Science Bowl and scientific articles I read in my free time. My voice falters on topics I don’t understand, so I leave a mental post-it note to review it later. Using simple terms helps me whittle down topics to their essence, and increases my comprehension of the material. Surprisingly, I learn and understand the concepts better as a teacher.\n\nAs night falls, neighborhood houses fade to darkness, and the crickets chirp a melody in unison. My lecture complete, I have finally learned everything taught to me today. Pausing for a minute, I absorb the beauty of the world around me before heading back to re-enter the real world. Now, my mind is focused, my stress feels tons lighter, and the gargantuan pile of homework seems easily manageable. I turn around to look outside my house one last time. The mist of darkness obscures the yard, but I still feel its presence, a symbol of my escape from society. Basking out there in the night, I journey for knowledge through self-reflection and discovery.\n\n\n\n"},{"_id":"4b3f55a57a128715de00005d","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1370872,"position":0.125,"parentId":"46a7be8c98be5bc1ea000068","content":"##Final Draft \n\nThe back porch door, worn out from years of use, slowly creaks open. The evening breeze fills the house, as the sun disappear below the horizon. I leave my stress at the door, and as I step into my backyard, I enter a whole new world. The pitch-black surprises me, but slowly the stars scattered around the night sky come into focus. Surrounded by the beauty of nature, I snuggle into the plastic chair in the middle of my backyard, and meditate in solitude. Away from the ever-present stress of my academia, I reflect upon all I learned today and discover myself.\nAt school, AP classes bombard me with endless lectures and abstruse details are fired at me like machine gun fire. Self-study methods I developed while pursuing college-level mathematics are overwhelmed by the volume of knowledge I must process every day. Finding the big picture is nigh impossible with PowerPoint lectures chockfull of details. Swamped by knowledge, I find no relief from the onslaught in the 5 minute \"breaks\" between classes. Here in my backyard, though, I cope with this overflow of knowledge. Beneath the starry sky, I review what I “learned” in the day, make connections and truly learn. \nMy backyard is my second classroom. Here, however, I am no longer the student, but rather the teacher. My plastic chair is my lectern. My lecture hall is surreally illuminated by the moon, casting a pale silvery glow on the rough concrete underneath my bare feet. I lecture to the stars to review the material imparted to me during the day. In my imagination, my classroom isn’t empty, but packed by a class of eager students. I use simple terms to explain the complex concepts in my lecture to heighten my understanding of the topic. Borrowing from teaching methods I learned through tutoring and advising science fair projects, I make connections between this new material and examples to develop understanding. Tonight, I must demystify today’s convoluted AP Biology lecture on cellular biology. Gathering my thoughts, I jump into the lecture. \n“Today, we’ll talk about cellular interactions with its environment.” As I lecture, my speech instincts subconsciously kick in, with overemphasized hand gestures and voice modulation. The thunder of my voice echos around the neighborhood, when I emphasize important concepts like cell compartmentalization, and my voice decreases to a dull roar as I detail cell compartmentalization’s many aspects. I throw in tidbits from Science Bowl and scientific articles I read in my free time. My voice falters on topics I don’t quite understand, and I leave a mental post-it note to review it later. Using simple terms helps me whittle down topics to their essence, and increases my comprehension of the material. Surprisingly, I learn and understand the concepts better as a teacher.\nNeighborhood houses fade to darkness, and the crickets chirp a melody in unison. My lecture complete, I have truly learned everything taught to me today. I pause for a minute, absorbing the beauty of the world around me before heading back home. I step across the porch door, and re-enter the real world. Now, my mind is focused, my stress feels tons lighter, and the gargantuan pile of homework seems easily manageable. I turn around to look outside my house one last time. The mist of darkness obscures the yard, but I still feel its presence, a symbol of my escape from society. Here, I journey for knowledge through self-reflection and discovery.\n"},{"_id":"4b4b0a7b7a128715de00006e","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":923142,"position":0.1875,"parentId":"46a7be8c98be5bc1ea000068","content":"##Final Draft\n\nThe back porch door, worn out from years of use, slowly creaks open. As the sun disappear below the horizon, an evening breeze fills the house. I step into my backyard and enter a whole new world. The pitch-black surprises me, but slowly the stars come into focus. I snuggle into the plastic chair in the middle of my backyard. Away from the ever-present stress of my academia, I reflect upon all I learned today to discover myself.\nAt school, abstruse details are fired at me like machine gun fire by AP classes who bombard me with endless lectures. The self-study methods I developed while pursuing college-level mathematics are overwhelmed by the volume of knowledge I must process every day. Finding the big picture is nigh impossible with PowerPoint lectures chockfull of details. Swamped by knowledge, I find no relief from the onslaught in the 5 minute \"breaks\" between classes. Here in my backyard, though, I cope with this overflow of knowledge. Beneath the starry sky, I review what I was taught in the day, make connections and find the bigger picture. \nMy backyard is my second classroom. Here, however, I am no longer the student, but rather the teacher. My plastic chair is my lectern. The moon casts pale silvery glow on the rough concrete underneath my bare feet. I lecture to the stars to review the material imparted to me during the day. In my imagination, my classroom isn’t empty, but packed by a class of eager students. I use simple terms to explain the complex concepts in my lecture to heighten my understanding of the topic. Borrowing from teaching methods I learned through tutoring and advising science fair projects, I make connections between this new material to further develop my understanding. Tonight, I must demystify today’s convoluted AP Biology lecture on cellular biology. Gathering my thoughts, I jump into the lecture. \n“Today, we’ll talk about cellular interactions with its environment.” As I lecture, my speech instincts subconsciously kick in, with overemphasized hand gestures and voice modulation. The thunder of my voice echoes around the neighborhood, when I emphasize important concepts like cell compartmentalization, decreasing to a dull roar as I detail cell compartmentalization’s many aspects. I throw in tidbits from Science Bowl and scientific articles I read in my free time. My voice falters on topics I don’t quite understand, so I leave a mental post-it note to review it later. Using simple terms helps me whittle down topics to their essence, and increases my comprehension of the material. Surprisingly, I learn and understand the concepts better as a teacher.\nNeighborhood houses slowly fade to darkness. My lecture complete, I have truly learned everything taught to me today. I pause for a minute, absorbing the beauty of the world around me before heading back inside. I step across the porch door to re-enter the real world. Now, my mind is focused, my stress feels tons lighter, and the gargantuan pile of homework seems easily manageable. I turn around to look outside one last time. The mist of darkness obscures the yard, but I still feel its presence, a symbol of my escape from society. There, basking in the night, I journey for knowledge through self-reflection and discovery.\n"},{"_id":"4b03a8fa060c0ac67e000051","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":918569,"position":0.25,"parentId":"46a7be8c98be5bc1ea000068","content":"##Rough Draft 2\nCreeeaaak. The back porch door, worn out from years of use, slowly opens. The night breeze fills the house, and the final rays of the sun disappear below the horizon. Darkness envelops my backyard, but the silhouette of my plastic chair is visible in the distance. As I step into my backyard, I leave my stress at the door, and enter a whole new world. The pitch-black night surprises me, but as my eyes acclimatize, the stars which litter the night sky come into focus. I snuggle into the tiny plastic chair in the middle of my backyard, surrounded by nature and in solitude. Away from my hectic life of academia, I reflect upon all I learned in the day, and truly discover.\nMy academic life is one of chaos and franticity. My AP classes riddle me with endless lectures and abstruse details like machine gun fire. The self-study method I developed while pursuing college-level mathematics fails to keep pace with the volume of knowledge thrusted upon me. Learning is about finding the big picture, nigh impossible to do in powerpoint lectures plastered in details. The 5 minute \"breaks\" between classes offer no relief from the onslaught. I cope with this overflow of knowledge here in my backyard. In this peaceful environment, society’s pressure does not control me and I review what I “learned” in the day, make connections and truly learn. \nMy plastic chair rocks back and forth on the pavement, tipped by a gentle breeze. My surroundings feel surreal (Show this to me), and in this realm I am the teacher, no longer a student. My nighttime lectures sitting in my plastic chair are verbal reviews of what I learn in the day. Pacing around and excessive hand gestures make me forget that I am indeed alone, and in my mind, I am teaching. college level material to a middle school class. My “students” know nothing about my lectures ,so I speak in simple terms to explain these complex concepts. Remembering the convoluted and length lecture in AP Biology this morning, and I resolve to better understand advanced cellular structure by the end of my lecture. \n“Today’s lecture is on cellular interations with its environment.” As I lecture, my speech instincts kick in and hand gestures are used without abandon. Subconsciously, I modulate my voice, loud when discussing important concepts like cell compartmentalization, and decreasing when describing its details. My voice falters in locations where I don’t have a solid understanding of the topic. Leaving a mental post-it note, I vow to review the topic later. My burden to teach in simple terms whittles down topics to their essence, and increases my comprehension of the material. Ironically, I learn and understand the concepts more as a teacher.\nNeighborhood house fade to darkness, and as the temperature drops, crickets begin to chirp a choral melody in unison. I pause for a minute, taking in the beauty of the world around me. My lecture complete, I have finally learned everything that was taught to me today. Walking back inside , I step back across my porch door, and re-enter the real world My mind is now in focus, my stress feels tons lighter, and the gargantuan pile of homework seems easily manageable. One last time, I turn around to my backyard. The mist of darkness obscures my surroundings, but I still feel its presence, a symbol of my escape from society. Surrounded by the darkness, I journey for knowledge through self-reflection and discovery. Some say it is darkest before dawn. Me? I dawn in the darkness.\n"},{"_id":"4ae73b42060c0ac67e00004f","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":907383,"position":0.5,"parentId":"46a7be8c98be5bc1ea000068","content":" 3 years of physics has taught that darkness is the absence of light rays. I've learned that reflections are caused by light bouncing off surfaces. Thus logically, you can't see reflections in the darkness. Yet surprisingly, my best self reflection comes in the cold dark night.\n\n The brisk wind hits me when I open the back porch door, as darkness begins to set in. When I step into my backyard, I leave the stressful and hectic society behind, and enter a whole new world. In school, I absorb an insane amount of knowledge that is impossible to process. My fast-paced AP classes bombard me with lecture after lecture. It is nigh impossible to make meaningful connections between what I learn and my previous knowledge in the 5 minute passing period \"breaks\" I am given. Here, however, I am free from all the stresses of society. Free to deviate from the strict curriculum of school. Free to unleash my imagination on the topics I learn in school. As I recuperate in this environment of peace and solitude, I make connections and truly learn. \n\nMy plastic chair that rocks back and forth unevenly on the pavement, tipped by the breeze that caresses the night. This is my lectern, and in this realm I am the teacher. As a professor and teacher of the night, I verbally review the critical asNo one hears my teachings, but I can imagine that the stars light years away listen to me teach. What should I teach today? My mind leaps to the AP Biology chapter that we speedily skimmed through in class. \n\nPacing around and excessive hand gestures make me forget that I am indeed alone, and in my imagination, I am lecturing to a class. My students don't know anything about cellular structure, so I speak in simple terms to explain these complex concepts. Hydrolytic enzymes. Microfilaments and cell motility. Extracellular matrix. As I lecture, I realize that my understanding of extracellular matrix interactions with the cell isn't very strong. Having to review in simple terms places a burden on me, but also Yet, after attempting to explain it, I find that I have actually found the explanation. I am not the student in this class, yet still I learn.\n\nAs I wear out the topic of biology, my mind turns to robotics. Snuggling into my chair as the chill of the night creeps in, I brainstorm ideas to overcome the challenges we face in our VEX Robotics Competition.Today's issue? The dreaded wall that separates our robot from the goal and victory. I let my imagination loose and welcome the many crazy nonsensical ideas. Design and hardware do not constrain me here: catapults, elevators, even spider legs come up in brainstorming. When I sit down with my engineering notebook, I'll whittle down these ideas through an intensive design process to find the most successful plan for the robot. But here, melded into the darkness, I'll focus on the essence of the idea. For robotics has taught me that the difference between Excellence and Decent, the difference between 1st and 2nd place is in the idea. The darkness which envelops me is endless, and as I embrace it, my creativity too becomes endless.\n\nI discuss my research: how my clash with cancer angiogenesis proceeds. My developments in mathematical modelling haven't been the result of days of algorithm coding and equation solving, but these simple 30 minute sessions, when I sit back and think about my project so far. The tempting allure to impulsively code and follow where my code takes me doesn't bother me here. I make decisions here, whether to. \n\nSome say that talking to myself is a waste, a Unix programmer piping output to /dev/null. Yet by presenting my ideas, I self-reflect. My sound waves will dissipate before a human being hears it, yet in the 30 minutes I teach ,I truly discover a lot. Le\n\nBy now, the ambiance is darker,the stars glow brighter, and the crickets start chirping in unison. A minute passes, as I sit in silence, taking in the beauty of the natural world around me. As I walk back inside, I reflect on all that I reviewed, designed, and discussed in the half-hour outside. Inside awaits a stack of homework that my teachers will gobble up. Inside awaits the unpredictable rollercoaster ride of my research. Despite its stresses and worries, inside awaits the exciting life I hope to continue leading. Although short, my 30 minutes away from society allows me the downtime to self-reflect, make decisions, and discover. Some say it is darkest before dawn. Me? I dawn in the darkness."},{"_id":"4a3f75f7f0bc5695b5000044","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":877873,"position":1,"parentId":"46a7be8c98be5bc1ea000068","content":"3 years of physics has told me that darkness is the absence of light rays in an environment. In the very same optics chapters, I've learned that reflections are caused by light bouncing off surfaces. Yet, I find it most surprising that I do my best self reflection in the dark.\n\nThe time is 9:00, and my students are just filling in. \"Good evening, class. I hope you all had a fine day. Today's lesson is going to be on the various functions of the cell. But first let me take attendance\". I scan and see Sirius, Betelgeuse, and Polaris all shining brightly at me. In the corner, Aldebaran looks like he's going to fall asleep. \n\nThroughout the day, teachers dump upon me an amount of knowledge that is near impossible to absorb in such a stressful environment. Now, however, I am ready to go back and tackle the information that was given to me. \n\nI settle back in this uneven plastic chair that rocks back and forth on the pavement, tipped by the gentle breeze that surrounds the night. All of a sudden, I am back in the classroom; this time, as the teacher. I take a moment to collect my thoughts and begin lecturing to the stars. Hydrolytic enzymes. Microfilaments and their effect on cell motility. As I teach biology to these giant balls of gas, I find the gaps in my own knowledge. My attempts to describe cellular movement fail, as I realize that my understanding of the extracellular matrix and interactions with the cell isn't as strong as it ought to be. Yet, after attempting to explain it, I find that I have actually found the explanation. I am not the student in this class, yet still I learn.\n\nMy class is quiet, but is attentive. I talk to them about my research, how my clash with cancer angiogenesis proceeds. My developments in mathematical modelling haven't been the result of days of algorithm coding and equation solving, but these simple 30 minute sessions, when I sit back and think about my project so far. Even as I complain to Polaris about how my surface area algorithm for the cancer modelling is slow, I find new ways to make it faster. Orion's Belt reminds me of Linkin Logs, a visual that allows me to tackle the algorithm in a whole new way. \n\nPeople often see my session with the stars much like a Unix programmer piping their output to /dev/null, as a fool's folly. Yet behind all of it is a purpose. The stars might not receive my sound waves for 2 billion years, yet in that short 30 minutes I sit outside,I learn productively, discover different methods, and make new connections.\n\nBy now, the ambiance is darker,the stars glow brighter, and the crickets have started chirping in unison. A quick glance at my watch tells me that my class has ended, and ceremoniously, I get up from my rickety lawn chair and make an exit from my lecture hall. As I make the journey, I think about the new algorithm that I'm going to code and the new journey that my research will take me. They say it is darkest before the dawn. For me, I find my dawn in the darkness."},{"_id":"4a404ac5b5e6fca09d00003c","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":884519,"position":2,"parentId":"46a7be8c98be5bc1ea000068","content":"3 years of physics has told me that darkness is the absence of light rays in an environment. In the very same optics chapters, I've learned that reflections are caused by light bouncing off surfaces. Yet, I find it most surprising that I do my best self reflection in the dark.\n\nThe time is 9:00, and my students are just filling in. \"Good evening, class. I hope you all had a fine day. Today's lesson is going to be on the various functions of the cell. But first let me take attendance\". I scan and see Sirius, Betelgeuse, and Polaris all shining brightly at me. In the corner, Aldebaran looks like he's going to fall asleep. \n\nThroughout the day, teachers dump upon me an amount of knowledge that is near impossible to absorb in such a stressful environment. Now, however, I am ready to go back and tackle the information that was given to me. \n\nI settle back in this uneven plastic chair that rocks back and forth on the pavement, tipped by the gentle breeze that surrounds the night. All of a sudden, I am back in the classroom; this time, as the teacher. I take a moment to collect my thoughts and begin lecturing to the stars. Hydrolytic enzymes. Microfilaments and their effect on cell motility. As I teach biology to these giant balls of gas, I find the gaps in my own knowledge. My attempts to describe cellular movement fail, as I realize that my understanding of the extracellular matrix and interactions with the cell isn't as strong as it ought to be. Yet, after attempting to explain it, I find that I have actually found the explanation. I am not the student in this class, yet still I learn.\n\nMy class is quiet, but is attentive. I talk to them about my research, how my clash with cancer angiogenesis proceeds. My developments in mathematical modelling haven't been the result of days of algorithm coding and equation solving, but these simple 30 minute sessions, when I sit back and think about my project so far. Even as I complain to Polaris about how my surface area algorithm for the cancer modelling is slow, I find new ways to make it faster. Orion's Belt reminds me of Linkin Logs, a visual that allows me to tackle the algorithm in a whole new way. \n\nPeople often see my session with the stars much like a Unix programmer piping their output to /dev/null, as a fool's folly. Yet behind all of it is a purpose. The stars might not receive my sound waves for 2 billion years, yet in that short 30 minutes I sit outside,I learn productively, discover different methods, and make new connections.\n\nBy now, the ambiance is darker,the stars glow brighter, and the crickets have started chirping in unison. A quick glance at my watch tells me that my class has ended, and ceremoniously, I get up from my rickety lawn chair and make an exit from my lecture hall. As I make the journey, I think about the new algorithm that I'm going to code and the new journey that my research will take me. They say it is darkest before the dawn. For me, I find my dawn in the darkness."},{"_id":"4a91e3f101c519569d00004a","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1018825,"position":5,"parentId":"46a7be8c98be5bc1ea000068","content":"##Rough Draft 1 \nI put down my near-empty water bottle to glance at my watch. Using one of the suit sleeves to wipe away my sweat, I quickly scan my surroundings. Trifold and poster boards line as far down the aisle as I can see. Across from me, a student seems to have developed a new engine technology. Next to me stands a student who mapped and discovered patterns in the human genome. Punctuating this scientific atmosphere is a man who charges down the aisle towards me with authority and a clipboard in his hand. State science fair judge incoming in 3.. 2.. 1.. Dispensing with all formalities, he begins the process “Tell me a little about your project”. Turning around to face my science fair board, I reminisce about the many months that went into this project, and I delve into my story.\n\nIt started as a simple blob detection experiment in images. By the end, my project evolved into an intelligent breast cancer detection machine. I researched. I developed. I designed. I raced through pages and pages of code, doing computer science courses on Coursera and EdX, scouring for knowledge. As I tested various methods to predict cancer, confusion set in. Implementations of computer algorithms crowded my mind, each one as ineffective as the last. Much like Edison’s quest to find a lightbulb filament, I powered through different algorithms day and night. Despite my persistent attacks on the subject, my software was as good at predicting cancer as a coin flip. Finally, 4 endless weeks after my task began, the search ended. My bleary eyes couldn’t believe what I saw: an 80% detection rate. I tested the algorithm over and over again, and to my utter amazement, I had struck pay dirt. \n\nThis and much more, I spill to the judge. Staring into the judge’s scrutinizing eyes, I discuss the inner workings of my cancer detection algorithm. The humble beginnings of my project. The nitty gritty science behind my software. The weeks I spent toiling away for my singular goal. The judge experiences my euphoria vicariously as I talk about the moment my success rate finally ballooned. I enthusiastically explain how my software allows for simple automated breast cancer diagnostics, eliminating the doctor from the equation. As the judge shakes my hand and walks away from my booth, the nervousness that had festered at the beginning of the day is replaced by a new feeling: pride. \n\nAt the awards ceremony that night, I waited in anticipation for the prize that was sure to come. I had come to the state science fair with an expectation to win. Yet awards kept out being given out, but I never heard my name. On the way back from the competition, \n\nI couldn’t return with a first-place ribbon that day, but the California State Science Fair imbued me with a spirit of scientific discovery that lives on with me today.The lessons I learned from my judges helped me advance my project to a deeper level. The people I met remain a network of scientists that I talk with today. I will never forget my experience at the state science fair, for it has been my biggest influence as a researcher and as a scientist. To this day, I keep the souvenir pin on my suit. I don’t think I shall take it off. It means a lot to me. "},{"_id":"46a7bf5298be5bc1ea000069","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":373030,"position":5,"parentId":"46a7ad2e98be5bc1ea000064","content":"##Accomplishment\nDiscuss an accomplishment or event, formal or informal, that marked your transition from childhood to adulthood within your culture, community, or family."},{"_id":"4b73861a8c0a5fb590000076","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1444747,"position":1.4609375,"parentId":"46a7776f98be5bc1ea000045","content":"#Princeton\n\n*1/1/15 -- done*"},{"_id":"4b73865b8c0a5fb590000077","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1399197,"position":1,"parentId":"4b73861a8c0a5fb590000076","content":"Please briefly elaborate on one of your extracurricular activities or work experiences that was particularly meaningful to you. (About 150 words)\n"},{"_id":"4e109452258ae903b500010d","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1413659,"position":1.25,"parentId":"4b73865b8c0a5fb590000077","content":"A glint of silver flashes down my arm. My shako set and flute in hand, I march onto the turf. The stands loom in front of me, crowded with spectators and judges. The stadium lights illuminate me on this stage, and facing the packed bleachers, I realize this is my moment.\n\nNo, this is our moment. I face my fellow marching band members. Brought together by a passion for music, these band geeks have helped me develop musically and socially over the last 3 years, and have become my family.\n\nI express my uniqueness through the conformity of marching band. We wear identical uniforms, we march with similar technique, we are literally one. Through my music, however, I surpass this conformity and channel my inner soul. Painting an illusion , I captivate the audience every step of the way. On the field, I make more than music. I make memories."},{"_id":"4e0dd1df258ae903b500010b","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1373998,"position":1.5,"parentId":"4b73865b8c0a5fb590000077","content":"##RD 2\nA glint of silver flashes down my arm. My shako set, I march onto the turf. The stands loom in front of me, crowded with spectators and judges. The stadium lights illuminate me on this stage. Facing the packed bleachers, I realize this is my moment.\n\nNo, this is our moment. I face my fellow marching band members. Brought together by a passion for music, these band geeks have helped me develop musically and socially over the last 3 years. A bond forged by passion, they have become my family.\n\nI express my uniqueness through the conformity of marching band. We wear identical uniforms, we march with similar technique, and we are literally one. Through my music, however, I surpass this conformity and channel my soul. Painting an illusion , I captivate the audience every step of the way. On the field, I make more than music. I make memories."},{"_id":"4d30f9caf12ccd1bc20000e6","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1372903,"position":2,"parentId":"4b73865b8c0a5fb590000077","content":"A glint of silver flashes down my arm. With my shako set, I march onto the astroturf. The stands loom in front of me, crowded with spectators and judges. The stadium lights illuminate me on this stage, and facing the packed bleachers, I realize this is my moment. \n\nNo, this is our moment. I face my fellow marching band members, brought together by a passion for music. A bond forged by countless hours toiling for one unified goal, they have become my family.\n\nWe find uniqueness in conformity. We wear identical uniforms, we march with similar technique, we are unique individuals who have become one. Yet ,through our music, we break this conformity and channel our inner soul. We paint an illusion from the first melodious note to the final statement,captivating the audience every step of the way. On the field, we make more than music. We make memories."},{"_id":"4d820a247e502418540000f4","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1297764,"position":3,"parentId":"4b73865b8c0a5fb590000077","content":"Talk about Robotics"},{"_id":"4b7388258c0a5fb590000078","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1235368,"position":2,"parentId":"4b73861a8c0a5fb590000076","content":"Please tell us how you have spent the last two summers (or vacations between school years), including any jobs you have held. (About 150 words)\n"},{"_id":"4e43edd2f320637daf00010f","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1415615,"position":1.25,"parentId":"4b7388258c0a5fb590000078","content":"##RD 2\nI had huge plans to follow my quirky pursuits over the summer. I was going to hike my neighborhood hills, build robotic t-shirt launchers,develop software applications,and whatever intellectually stimulated me. However, my highlight of the summer wasn't on this bucket list though: fighting cancer.\n\n Come summer vacation, I was on the front line of cancer modelling research. Shocked by the misdiagnosis of my aunt’s cancer, I strove to understand cancer diagnosis. Through insightful studying and guidance from professionals, I independently developed a dynamical mathematical model to made unique discoveries regarding cancer criticality.\n\nNew complications emerged at every turn, and fatigue and weariness often kicked in. However, the thrill of making a new discovery was unparalleled and I am now addicted. I have drunk from the pool of scientific research, and to this day, I continue my work, driven to rid Earth of the plague of cancer.\n"},{"_id":"4d95417f6fbed4bacc0000f8","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1395826,"position":1.5,"parentId":"4b7388258c0a5fb590000078","content":"\n##RD 1\n\nI never thought I would be fighting cancer. Come summer vacation, I was on the front line of cancer modelling research. Shocked by the misdiagnosis of my aunt’s cancer, I strove to understand cancer diagnosis. Over my summer break, I independently developed a dynamical mathematical model to made unique discoveries regarding cancer criticality.\n\nNew complications emerged at every turn, as this deep level of research was littered with unknown and undiscovered concepts. After slaving away at the same problem for weeks, fatigue and weariness often kicked in. However, the thrill of making a new discovery was unparalleled and drove me to continue research.\n\nI have drunk from the pool of scientific research, and I am now addicted. To this day, I continue my work, driven to rid Earth of this plague.\n \n"},{"_id":"4d31951f2b4b3740280000e9","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1310277,"position":2,"parentId":"4b7388258c0a5fb590000078","content":"This summer, I conducted my own independent research in the breast cancer field. "},{"_id":"4b73885f8c0a5fb590000079","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1233134,"position":3,"parentId":"4b73861a8c0a5fb590000076","content":"Your favorite book and its author:\nYour favorite movie:\nYour favorite website:\nTwo adjectives your friends would use to describe you:\nYour favorite recording:\nYour favorite keepsake or memento:\nYour favorite source of inspiration:\nYour favorite word:\nYour favorite line from a movie or book and its title:\n"},{"_id":"4d30ff04f12ccd1bc20000e7","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1233979,"position":2,"parentId":"4b73885f8c0a5fb590000079","content":"Your favorite book and its author: A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole\nYour favorite movie: Inception\nYour favorite website: \nTwo adjectives your friends would use to describe you: Risktaking, Sarcastic\nYour favorite recording: When I'm running, Eminem's Curtain Call. When I'm studying, Coldplay and the Fray. \nYour favorite keepsake or memento:\nYour favorite source of inspiration: Elon Musk\nYour favorite word:Panache\nYour favorite line from a movie or book and its title: \"The greatest trick the devil ever pulled was convincing the world he didn't exist. And like that... He was gone\" The Usual Suspects \n"},{"_id":"4b7392e68c0a5fb590000081","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":967834,"position":3.5,"parentId":"4b73861a8c0a5fb590000076","content":"##Supplemental Essays\n"},{"_id":"4e49f51e7bd32aecae000112","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1858336,"position":0.25,"parentId":"4b7392e68c0a5fb590000081","content":"*\"Creativity is just connecting things. \" -- Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson*\n\nMy cancer diagnosis research has hit a wall. A crucial surface area algorithm has bottlenecked my simulation, preventing any further development. For four weeks, I studied research articles, tested various algorithms, and tenaciously wrote code, all to no avail. My determination was flagging, and today appeared to be another fruitless search. Wiped out by a seemingly insurmountable obstacle, I discovered that the answer was right in front of my eyes, behind the research journals I'd been poring through. Using the beloved children's toy bricks, I connected Legos to tumors to discover a new view of cancer criticality.\n\nMy mathematical research was sparked by the false-positive diagnosis of my aunt's cancer. Mentally and medically destroyed by a disease she didn't possess, her misdiagnosis inspired me to pursue this field. Thirsting for knowledge, I studied several computational biology and data analysis courses on Coursera, EdX, and MIT OCW. Through my independent research, I developed a novel mathematical model of interactions between cardiovascular systems and tumors to diagnose cancer criticality. Undiscovered concepts and puzzling problems riddled my path of research. Although I persevered through most of the barriers, the calculation of cellular surface area had me stumped. My initial algorithm was incredibly slow, and developing new algorithms all led to the same inefficiency. Mathematical biology textbooks and research journals lay strewn on my desk, none with solutions. Having exhausted every resource available to me, I was back at square one. I began having doubts and my enthusiasm for my research dwindled. \n\nAs it turned out, I was searching in the wrong place. My solution came as I built a Lego set with my toddler cousin. As she attempted to count the number of Legos in the tower, she mistakenly counted the number of sides. Laughing, I corrected her, when it hit me like a freight train. By visualizing a cancerous cell as a Lego structure, I could develop a new surface area algorithm. For the first time in weeks, I felt driven by purpose. Through the fog of my elation, I realized that I was no longer reading the book of science; I was writing it.\n\nMy journey pursuing cancer diagnosis has shaped my life in many ways. Research gifted me a high level of knowledge about dynamical mathematical models, cancerous biochemical interactions, and computer-based analyses. The high-level problems taught me the importance of focus and whittled away my procrastination. Most of all, research gave me the gift of creativity: the ability to look at problems through unique paradigms. It still amazes me how a Lego, a simple childrens’ toy, could instigate a surface area algorithm. With Legos, I discovered a new perspective on cancer criticality, the research I submitted to the Intel STS and Siemens Research Competition, pending publication. With the help of Legos, my research has redefined the way I approach problems, and I seek small inspirations to tackle big problems. In research, school, and life, I encounter new obstacles more challenging than ever, but I conquer them with diligence, perseverance, and most importantly, panache."},{"_id":"4df97b3593a54c00eb000104","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1364833,"position":0.5,"parentId":"4b7392e68c0a5fb590000081","content":"*\"The world of reality has its bounds, the world of imagination is boundless\" *\n-- Emile by Jean-Jacques Rosseau (Excerpted from AP European History Textbook)"},{"_id":"4b7397748c0a5fb590000086","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1368191,"position":5,"parentId":"4b7392e68c0a5fb590000081","content":"Using a favorite quotation from an essay or book you have read in the last three years as a starting point, tell us about an event or experience that helped you define one of your values or changed how you approach the world. Please write the quotation, title and author at the beginning of your essay."},{"_id":"4cff64480697a6ae06000109","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1186154,"position":1,"parentId":"4b7397748c0a5fb590000086","content":"##Choose this prompt, talk about research"},{"_id":"4cffede50697a6ae06000115","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1186370,"position":2,"parentId":"4b7397748c0a5fb590000086","content":"Quotes:\n\nALice in Wonderland : \"I can't go back to yesterday because I was a different person then.”"},{"_id":"4cfff1580697a6ae06000116","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1186372,"position":3,"parentId":"4b7397748c0a5fb590000086","content":"“I know not all that may be coming, but be it what it will, I'll go to it laughing.”\n"},{"_id":"4cfff71b0697a6ae06000117","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1186373,"position":4,"parentId":"4b7397748c0a5fb590000086","content":"Not all those who wander are lost;\n"},{"_id":"4de96f7983194c9191000100","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1356056,"position":1,"parentId":"4cfff71b0697a6ae06000117","content":"##This One\n\n##Harvard Essay\n##Change to emphasize this quote"},{"_id":"4cfffb970697a6ae06000118","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1186375,"position":5,"parentId":"4b7397748c0a5fb590000086","content":"“Most men and women will grow up to love their servitude and will never dream of revolution.” —Brave New World (Amber D.)\n"},{"_id":"46a779f798be5bc1ea000048","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":967805,"position":3,"parentId":"46a7776f98be5bc1ea000045","content":"#University of Chicago\n*1/1/15*"},{"_id":"4d88f29e7e502418540000f7","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1300216,"position":0.25,"parentId":"46a779f798be5bc1ea000048","content":"##Favorites\n(Optional) Share with us a few of your favorite books, poems, authors, films, plays, pieces of music, musicians, performers, paintings, artists, blogs, magazines, or newspapers. Feel free to touch on one, some, or all of the categories listed, or add a category of your own.\n"},{"_id":"4d88f13b7e502418540000f6","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1444649,"position":0.5,"parentId":"46a779f798be5bc1ea000048","content":"##Why UChicago?\n\nHow does the University of Chicago, as you know it now, satisfy your desire for a particular kind of learning, community, and future? Please address with some specificity your own wishes and how they relate to UChicago"},{"_id":"4ea0120d13e227270f00011d","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1445504,"position":1,"parentId":"4d88f13b7e502418540000f6","content":"\nBy applying to the University of Chicago, I broke one of life's cardinal rules: don't fall in love at first sight. First introduced to the school through a college representative, I was immediately hooked to the University. Coming home, I scoured the webs to learn more, and my enchantment quickly grew. I could spend pages and pages talking about the countless aspects of the University of Chicago that entrance me, but simply, I love all of it. I am a lock, and the University of Chicago is my key, ready to unlock my potential. \nExploration has always been important to me, both academic and physical. As I began learning and discovering in my high school math classes (Calculus AB particularly), I stumbled upon the beauty of mathematical research. Coupled with my love of science fair projects, I pursued independent cancer diagnosis research, developing dynamical models of cancer interactions with the cardiovascular system. Knowledge was my drug, and I was addicted: relentlessly studying online courses on computational biology and poring through all the research articles I could get my hands on. I look forward to immersing myself into UChicago's enormous variety of courses, whether for computational mathematics or my core classes. The core curriculum is a godsend for me, and I know I will enjoy studying Shakespeare, geography, ancient Greek philosopy, and whatever else Chicago throws at me.\t\n\nEven beyond academics, I love exploring my environment .My love of exploration has granted me the luxury of exploring many landscapes: busy urban cities, rural towns, and desolate and pristine natural wonders. So when I say that the University of Chicago takes my breath away, it means a lot to me. In many ways, U of C reminds me of Hogwarts: a Gothic feel, the house system, the magic of learning, and of course the Quidditch intramural teams. As Harry Potter did, I will enjoy and explore the nooks and crannies of the University. While at the University of Chicago, I hope to immerse myself in the vibrant culture of the Windy City, learning and discovering.\n\nAt heart, I am a adventurer. Exploration and knowledge fuels me and draws me closer to the University of Chicago. Others may claim that Chicago is where \"fun goes to die\", but I find myself vehemently disagreeing. To me, the pursuit of knowledge is the greatest enjoyment one can possibly experience. Whether it is the academics, the beautiful landscape, or the school's philosopy, I find myself hopelessly in love. I see myself becoming one with the University of Chicago, thriving on my continual quest for knowledge. "},{"_id":"46a7981e98be5bc1ea000051","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":372991,"position":1,"parentId":"46a779f798be5bc1ea000048","content":"##Odd Numbers\n\nWhat's so odd about odd numbers?"},{"_id":"4e95d8a0a2c080e71400011c","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1441420,"position":0.5,"parentId":"46a7981e98be5bc1ea000051","content":"It's the most common horror story. You're with a friend at a restaurant ,having devoured a volumptious meal. Picking at your teeth with toothpicks, you see a waiter with the bill. Through silent agreement, the two decide to split the cost. But when you open the bill, you realize the horror.\n\n$21! How are we going to split that? Like two duelers, you both take out your wallets, ready to avoid the awkward situation. You each put down $10, but the last dollar stares up at you.\"I'll cover the costs\" \"No, don't bother. I'll pay it for you\". \"No, I insist. \" As you relentlessly argue over $1, you, like many people, begin to despise odd numbers and wish that they didn't exist. \n\nHumans inherently despise odd numbers. A social species, Homo Sapiens love companionship and evenness, choosing to shun the \"oddities\". The third tier of Maslow's hierarchy of needs stipulates that humans love company and evenness, leading to marriage, social circles, book clubs, and other social structures. Our need for evenness is apparent from the youngest age, on the elementary school playground. Whether kickball, on the slides, hopscotch, everyone tended toward a group activity, their claim to evenness. Sift through these cliques, and you'll stumble upon the \"nerd\", quietly reading a book in the corner of the playground. Unique among the rest, he transcends the need for belonging and acceptance, seeming odd to us. \n\nAs it happens, odd numbers are interspersed throughout society, not willing to fit into the groups of society. At work, you make awkward conversation with the one outcast coworker, the extra puzzle piece in the work environment. As you drive back The radio spouts negative opinions of the actions of rogue governments and dictatorships like North Korea. Even reclusive neighbors who never venture from home appear odd. The TV displays stories of social extremists, whose absurd actions and devoted beliefs casts them into the negative public eye. Society views odd numbers in a negative light and fights back against them for one reason: odd numbers are infinitely more powerful than even numbers.\n\nWe fear the power of odd numbers, who through nonconformity, can successfully challenge society's beliefs. All humans were once odd numbers, with their unique flair, but our desire for companionship drove us to become even. In comparison, odd numbers aren't afraid to stand out. Tackling the world with a different paradigm, they don't acquiesce to popular thought or opinion. Even when society beats them down, they stand back up, exhibiting courage and tenacity of beliefs. The greatest odd numbers were activists, whether for civil rights like Martin Luther King Jr, for freedom like Mahatma Gandhi, or for equality like Malala Yousafzai. These odd numbers are often drivers of social change, promoting their unique beliefs to significantly change society.\n\nPerhaps what makes odd numbers so odd is their ability to unlock our oddities. Bringing out little flairs of uniqueness, whether ideological beliefs, technological ideas, or creativity,odd numbers unleash social revolutions throughout society. As the tireless \"odd\" warriors fight against society's standards for their own belief, these odd numbers finally change society's standards and gain acceptance. In the struggle for these odd numbers to become even, they put their mark on history. \n"},{"_id":"4e3beca981342742fe00010e","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1424813,"position":1,"parentId":"46a7981e98be5bc1ea000051","content":"It's a situation that we've all faced sometime in our lives. You've gone with your friend to a restaurant (strictly platonic), and now finished with that volumptious meal, picking at our teeth with toothpicks when the bill comes. On the outside, it looks fine. After all, we're good friends, we can split it. But as you open the bill, you begin to realize the horror. $19? How are we going to split that? I must be not looking right. Nearby diners peer over their conversations, and with a simple head nod, give their regrets and sympathy for your situation. With a loud sigh and an elbow to their shoulder, you notify your friend to the situation, who immediately jumps up in surprise. Like two duelers, you both take out your wallets with cash, ready to pay and avoid the awkward situation. You each put down $9, and the last dollar left stares up at you. \n\"I'll cover the costs\" \"No, don't bother. I'll pay it for you\". \"No, I insist. I'll pay it\" It's these embarassing situations that give odd numbers their terrible reputation. Known for breaking friendships and who knows what else, most people wish odd numbers didn't exist. \nBut enough about \n\n\n\n\n\nThey're the odd one in the group. \nThe downfall of the odd numbers has been one of significance in this world. At one time, odd numbers ruled the world. Ancient Mesopotamian architecture used to based on the pental system (5) , and when we used to count on our hands, it used to start with the number one. One was the first number imaginable, and thusly gained the wonderful reputation it did. We soon discovered the wonder of prime numbers and their mystique. I won "},{"_id":"46a79c2598be5bc1ea000052","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1368166,"position":2,"parentId":"46a779f798be5bc1ea000048","content":"##Untranslateable Words\n\nIn French, there is no difference between \"conscience\" and \"consciousness\". In Japanese, there is a word that specifically refers to the splittable wooden chopsticks you get at restaurants. The German word “fremdschämen” encapsulates the feeling you get when you’re embarrassed on behalf of someone else. All of these require explanation in order to properly communicate their meaning, and are, to varying degrees, untranslatable. Choose a word, tell us what it means, and then explain why it cannot (or should not) be translated from its original language. "},{"_id":"4df9f63b93a54c00eb000105","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1364909,"position":1,"parentId":"46a79c2598be5bc1ea000052","content":""},{"_id":"46a79cf398be5bc1ea000053","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":372989,"position":3,"parentId":"46a779f798be5bc1ea000048","content":"##Groups of Three\n\nLittle pigs, french hens, a family of bears. Blind mice, musketeers, the Fates. Parts of an atom, laws of thought, a guideline for composition. Omne trium perfectum? Create your own group of threes, and describe why and how they fit together. "},{"_id":"46a79e3998be5bc1ea000054","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":372993,"position":4,"parentId":"46a779f798be5bc1ea000048","content":"##pH\n\nWere pH an expression of personality, what would be your pH and why? (Feel free to respond acidly! Do not be neutral, for that is base!) "},{"_id":"46a79eca98be5bc1ea000055","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":372994,"position":5,"parentId":"46a779f798be5bc1ea000048","content":"##Here\n\nA neon installation by the artist Jeppe Hein in UChicago’s Charles M. Harper Center asks this question for us: “Why are you here and not somewhere else?” (There are many potential values of \"here\", but we already know you're \"here\" to apply to the University of Chicago; pick any \"here\" besides that one). "},{"_id":"46a79f9298be5bc1ea000056","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":372995,"position":6,"parentId":"46a779f798be5bc1ea000048","content":"##Free Prompt\n\nIn the spirit of adventurous inquiry, pose a question of your own. If your prompt is original and thoughtful, then you should have little trouble writing a great essay. Draw on your best qualities as a writer, thinker, visionary, social critic, sage, citizen of the world, or future citizen of the University of Chicago; take a little risk, and have fun."},{"_id":"5133dacfd25159986d000122","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1798373,"position":0.5,"parentId":"46a79f9298be5bc1ea000056","content":""},{"_id":"4ea4cb87c0e1670d9a00011e","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1448065,"position":1,"parentId":"46a79f9298be5bc1ea000056","content":" ###Q: You are a superhero with the most anti-climactic power ever. Describe your life fighting crime.\n\n*\"Note: What you are about to read may seem like a work of fiction, but it is very much true. No facts have been altered, and the gruesome details you will hear will... But I digress. I'll let the story talk for itself\" — Math Man*\n\nCancer is a complex and mysterious subject – while we know so much about it, we have yet to unlock all of its secrets. I intend to. My name is Math Man, and I will fight against cancer, using the powers of mathematics to understand how this plague works. I have an innate talent for mathematics, whether solving for the prime factorizations of numbers, calculating digits of pi, or finding derivatives and integrals. Some say that it is a \"stupid\"and \"silly\" superpower, and indeed it pales to the speed of Flash or the strength of Superman. On my playing field of cancer modeling research,however, I am nothing short of a god.\nFor much time, my life had no aim. I knew I loved mathematics, and I developed knowledge of the minute details of the subject. I studied partial derivatives, Pascal numbers, and Monte Carlo methods. I expanded my understanding of my superpower, but I found no outlet. This all changed when my aunt was falsely diagnosed for cancer. Mentally and medically destroyed by the disease, her misdiagnosis stunned me, showing me the lack of our understanding of cancer diagnosis. At first I felt hopeless to stop this silent killer, but as I studied, I discovered the world of cancer modelling. Finally, my superpower could come to use. Enthralled, I set off on independent research, with the help of national cancer databases, professors in the field, and my background in dynamical mathematical models. Over the last two years, I developed a novel mathematical model of cancer angiogenesis, interactions between cardiovascular systems and tumors, to diagnose cancer criticality. \nUndiscovered concepts and puzzling problems riddled my path of research. Although I persevered through most of the barriers with my knowledge of applied calculus, one surface area algorithm in my cancer simulation had me stumped. My initial algorithm was incredibly slow, and developing new procedures all led to the same inefficiency. Mathematical biology textbooks and research journals lay strewn on my desk, none with solutions. I was back at square one and I began having doubts. Would this be Math-man's final stand?\nAs it turned out, I was searching in the wrong place. My solution came as I built a Lego set with my toddler cousin (yes even superheroes have family) . As she attempted to count the number of Legos in the set, she mistakenly counted the number of sides. Laughing, I corrected her, when it hit me like a freight train. By visualizing a cancerous cell as a Lego structure, I could develop a new surface area algorithm. For the first time in weeks, I felt driven by purpose. Through the fog of my elation, I realized that I found a chink in Cancer's armor; I was the hero of the day. \nResearch has shown me the true potential of my power. My cancer studies gifted me a high level of knowledge about dynamical mathematical models, cancerous biochemical interactions, and computer-based analyses. The high-level problems taught me the importance of focus and whittled away my procrastination. Most of all, research gave me the gift of creativity: the ability to look at problems through unique paradigms. It still amazes me how a Lego, a simple childrens’ toy, could instigate a surface area algorithm. With Legos, I discovered a new perspective on cancer criticality, the research I submitted to the Intel STS and Siemens Research Competition, pending publication. Cancer will continue throwing new obstacles at me more challenging than ever, but I shall conquer them with diligence, perseverance, and most importantly, mathematics. \n\nAfter all, I'm Math-man.\n"},{"_id":"46a7a32f98be5bc1ea000059","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1444749,"position":3.5,"parentId":"46a7776f98be5bc1ea000045","content":"#Stanford\n\n*1/3/15 -- done*"},{"_id":"46a7a37698be5bc1ea00005a","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1225370,"position":1,"parentId":"46a7a32f98be5bc1ea000059","content":"##Favorite Books\n\nName your favorite books, authors, films, and/or artists. (50 word limit)"},{"_id":"5133d8afd25159986d000121","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1798356,"position":2,"parentId":"46a7a37698be5bc1ea00005a","content":""},{"_id":"4d27f466f12ccd1bc20000e1","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1448157,"position":3,"parentId":"46a7a37698be5bc1ea00005a","content":"Books: Ender's Game, A Confederacy of Dunces, American Born Chinese, The Great Gatsby, The Hobbit, Alcatraz versus the Evil Librarians, 1984, Brave New World, \nMovies: Godfather, The Lego Movie, Frozen, The Usual Suspects, Inception, Interstellar\nSingers: Eminem, Calvin Harris, The Fray, Coldplay, Queen, Taylor Swift"},{"_id":"46a7a4e498be5bc1ea00005b","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1368381,"position":2,"parentId":"46a7a32f98be5bc1ea000059","content":"##Newspapers\n\nWhat newspapers, magazines, and/or websites do you enjoy? (50 word limit)"},{"_id":"4d27fc0af12ccd1bc20000e2","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1413554,"position":2,"parentId":"46a7a4e498be5bc1ea00005b","content":"Reddit, Lifehacker, Android Authority, New York Times, San Francisco Chronicle, BBC, Wall Street Journal, Google News, XKCD, The Oatmeal."},{"_id":"46a7a56d98be5bc1ea00005c","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":373003,"position":3,"parentId":"46a7a32f98be5bc1ea000059","content":"##World Problems\n\nWhat is the most significant challenge that society faces today? (50 word limit)"},{"_id":"4d60df62f475039cde0000ee","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1413557,"position":2,"parentId":"46a7a56d98be5bc1ea00005c","content":"Apathy. I really don't feel like talking about it though."},{"_id":"4d682c0df99da34d3f0000ef","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1280630,"position":3,"parentId":"46a7a56d98be5bc1ea00005c","content":"A lack of understanding of current world events and apathy of them . I really don't feel like talking about it though."},{"_id":"46a7a64298be5bc1ea00005d","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1392057,"position":4,"parentId":"46a7a32f98be5bc1ea000059","content":"##Summer Plans\n\nHow did you spend your last two summers? (50 word limit)"},{"_id":"4d3304a62b4b3740280000ea","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1413560,"position":2,"parentId":"46a7a64298be5bc1ea00005d","content":"Over the summer, I pursued independent research modelling blood vessels near cancerous tissue to better understand . When not immersed in my cancer diagnosis research, I hiked my neighborhood hills, built robotic t-shirt launchers, and developed software applications, enjoying life under the warm California sun. "},{"_id":"4b73ce008c0a5fb590000087","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":948733,"position":4.5,"parentId":"46a7a32f98be5bc1ea000059","content":"Briefly elaborate on one of your extracurricular activities or work experiences. (150 word limit)\n"},{"_id":"4d2856c8f12ccd1bc20000e5","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1413563,"position":1,"parentId":"4b73ce008c0a5fb590000087","content":"A glint of silver flashes down my arm. With my shako set, I march onto the astroturf. The stands loom in front of me, crowded with spectators and judges. The stadium lights illuminate me on this stage, and facing the packed bleachers, I realize this is my moment. \n\nNo, this is our moment. I face my fellow marching band members, brought together by a passion for music. A bond forged by countless hours toiling for one unified goal, they have become my family.\n\nWe find uniqueness in conformity. We wear identical uniforms, we march with similar technique, we are unique individuals who have become one. Yet ,through our music, we break this conformity and channel our inner soul. We paint an illusion from the first melodious note to the final statement,captivating the audience every step of the way. On the field, we make more than music. We make memories."},{"_id":"46a7a74698be5bc1ea00005e","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":373006,"position":5,"parentId":"46a7a32f98be5bc1ea000059","content":"##Favorite Events\nWhat were your favorite events (e.g., performances, exhibits, competitions, conferences, etc.) in recent years? (50 word limit)\n"},{"_id":"4d334bee2b4b3740280000ed","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1413605,"position":1.5,"parentId":"46a7a74698be5bc1ea00005e","content":" At VEX Robotics Competitions, I show off the mechanical beauty of our robots and face off in battle against the best bots in the Bay Area. \n\nAt MUN conferences, through eloquent public speaking and skillful diplomacy, I tackle the world's most pressing problems."},{"_id":"4d33391a2b4b3740280000ec","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1235469,"position":2,"parentId":"46a7a74698be5bc1ea00005e","content":" At VEX Robotics Competitions, I show off the mechanical beauty of our robots and viscerally face off against the best bots in the Bay Area. At MUN conferences, I am a politician at the highest stage possible: the United Nations. Through eloquent public speaking and skillful diplomacy, I tackle the world's most pressing problems."},{"_id":"46a7a7e798be5bc1ea00005f","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":373008,"position":6,"parentId":"46a7a32f98be5bc1ea000059","content":"##Historical Moments\nWhat historical moment or event do you wish you could have witnessed? (50 word limit)"},{"_id":"4e5f124af2f295c535000118","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1413612,"position":1.5,"parentId":"46a7a7e798be5bc1ea00005f","content":"2 particles travelling near the speed of light. One impact. In July 2012, the Large Hadron Collider proved the existence of the Higgs Boson.I wish I had been at CERN that day as we permeated space and time to discover the “God particle” that grants us mass."},{"_id":"4d2839e4f12ccd1bc20000e3","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1281099,"position":2,"parentId":"46a7a7e798be5bc1ea00005f","content":"2 particles travelling near the speed of light. One impact. In July 2012, the Large Hadron Collider proved the existence of the Higgs Boson.Long theorized yet never proven, that day we permeated space and time itself to catch a glimpse at this \"God particle\", revolutionizing physics as we knew it."},{"_id":"46a7a88f98be5bc1ea000060","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":803095,"position":7,"parentId":"46a7a32f98be5bc1ea000059","content":"##5 Words\n\nWhat five words best describe you?"},{"_id":"4d284fe7f12ccd1bc20000e4","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1413642,"position":2,"parentId":"46a7a88f98be5bc1ea000060","content":"Daredevil, Dreamer, Quirky, Sunburnt, Elocuter"},{"_id":"46a7aa7598be5bc1ea000061","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":373015,"position":8,"parentId":"46a7a32f98be5bc1ea000059","content":"\n##Intellectual Vitality\n\nStanford students possess an intellectual vitality. Reflect on an idea or experience that has been important to your intellectual development. (100 to 250 words)"},{"_id":"4e605e7ab8ca4383ac00011b","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1414340,"position":0.125,"parentId":"46a7aa7598be5bc1ea000061","content":"\nMy cancer diagnosis research had hit a wall. A crucial surface area algorithm bottlenecked my cancer simulation, preventing any further development. My initial algorithm was incredibly slow, but developing and testing new algorithms all led to the same inefficiency. I scoured the Internet for my quandary, but found nothing. Mathematical biology textbooks and research journals lay strewn on my desk, all without solutions.Having exhausted all my resources, I was back at square one, spiraling toward failure. \nAs it turns out, I was searching in the wrong place. My solution sparked as I built a Lego set with my toddler cousin. My interest piqued when she attempted to count the number of Legos in the set, but mistakenly counted the number of sides. Laughing, I corrected her, when it hit me like a freight train. By visualizing a cancerous cell as a composition of Lego-like structures, I could develop a new surface area algorithm.Through the fog of my elation, I realize that I am no longer reading the book of science; I am writing it.\nIt amazes me how the simple children's toy brick optimized my research, which I submitted to Intel STS and the Siemens Research Competition. Legos taught me to tackle my obstacles with panache and imagination by looking at issues through unique perspectives. Small observations help me defeat big problems, and I now keenly observe my surroundings, searching for the next inspiration to rock my world. "},{"_id":"4e5f9bc2da4d814f30000119","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1414338,"position":0.25,"parentId":"46a7aa7598be5bc1ea000061","content":"\nMy cancer diagnosis research had hit a wall. A crucial surface area algorithm bottlenecked my cancer simulation, preventing any further development. My initial algorithm was incredibly slow, but developing and testing new algorithms all led to the same inefficiency. I scoured the Internet for my quandary, but found nothing. Mathematical biology textbooks and research journals lay strewn on my desk, all without solutions.Having exhausted all my resources, I was back at square one, spiraling toward failure. \nAs it turns out, I was searching in the wrong place. My solution sparked as I built a Lego set with my toddler cousin. My interest piqued when she attempted to count the number of Legos in the set, but mistakenly counted the number of sides. Laughing, I corrected her, when it hit me like a freight train. By visualizing a cancerous cell as a composition of Lego-like structures, I could develop a new surface area algorithm.Through the fog of my elation, I realize that I am no longer reading the book of science; I am writing it.\nIt amazes me how Legos, a simple children's toy, helped me diagnose cancer criticality, research I submitted to Intel STS and the Siemens Research Competition, pending publication. Research taught me creativity: the ability to look at problems through unique perspectives. Legos taught me to tackle my obstacles with panache and imagination. Small inspirations help me defeat big problems, and I now keenly observe my surroundings, looking for the next thing to rock my world. "},{"_id":"4dfb28b4a194f4b569000107","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1365222,"position":0.5,"parentId":"46a7aa7598be5bc1ea000061","content":"##New Essay\n\nSee MIT one\n\tMy cancer diagnosis research has hit a wall. A crucial surface area algorithm has bottlenecked my cancer simulation, preventing any further development. Undiscovered concepts and puzzling problems riddled my cancer diagnosis research. Although I had managed to persevere through most of the barriers, the calculation of cellular surface area had me stumped. My initial algorithm was incredibly slow, requiring redesign. Developing and testing new algorithms all led to the same inefficiency. Mathematical biology textbooks and research journals lay strewn on my desk, all without solutions. Having exhausted every resource available to me, I was back at square one. My determination was flagging, and today was destined to be another fruitless search. \n\tMy solution came as I built a Lego set with my toddler cousin. My interest piqued when she attempted to count the number of Legos in the tower, but mistakenly counted the number of sides. Laughing, I corrected her, when it hit me like a freight train. By visualizing a cancerous cell as a composition of Lego-like structures, I could develop a new surface area algorithm.Through the fog of my elation, I realize that I am no longer reading the book of science; I am writing it.\n\nLegos helped me overcome my major obstacle, and led to new discoveries on cancer criticality, researach that I submitted to Intel STS and the Siemens Research Competition. Research gave me the gift of creativity: the ability to look at problems through unique perspectives. It still amazes me how Legos, a simple childrens’ toy, helped me diagnose cancer criticality, research I submitted to Intel STS and the Siemens Research Competition, pending publication. I encounter new obstacles more challenging and confounding than ever, but I tackle them with panache.\n\n(517 words)"},{"_id":"4e5e798e7bd32aecae000116","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1410569,"position":0.75,"parentId":"46a7aa7598be5bc1ea000061","content":"\nMy cancer diagnosis research had hit a wall. A crucial surface area algorithm bottlenecked my cancer simulation, preventing any further development. My initial algorithm was incredibly slow, but developing and testing new algorithms all led to the same inefficiency. I scoured the Internet for my quandary, but found nothing. Mathematical biology textbooks and research journals lay strewn on my desk, all without solutions.Having exhausted all my resources, I was back at square one, spiraling toward failure. \nAs it turns out, I was searching in the wrong place. My solution sparked as I built a Lego set with my toddler cousin. My interest piqued when she attempted to count the number of Legos in the set, but mistakenly counted the number of sides. Laughing, I corrected her, when it hit me like a freight train. By visualizing a cancerous cell as a composition of Lego-like structures, I could develop a new surface area algorithm.Through the fog of my elation, I realize that I am no longer reading the book of science; I am writing it.\nIt amazes me how Legos, a simple children's toy, helped me diagnose cancer criticality, research I submitted to Intel STS and the Siemens Research Competition, pending publication. Research taught me creativity: the ability to look at problems through unique perspectives. Legos taught me to tackle my obstacles with panache and imagination. Small inspirations help me defeat big problems, and I now keenly observe my surroundings, looking for the next thing to rock my world. "},{"_id":"4cff7a8f0697a6ae06000114","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1410568,"position":1,"parentId":"46a7aa7598be5bc1ea000061","content":"\n\tMy cancer diagnosis research has hit a wall. A crucial surface area algorithm has bottlenecked my cancer simulation, preventing any further development.\n Undiscovered concepts and puzzling problems riddled my cancer diagnosis research. Although I had managed to persevere through most of the barriers, the calculation of cellular surface area had me stumped. My initial algorithm was incredibly slow, requiring redesign. Developing and testing new algorithms all led to the same inefficiency. Mathematical biology textbooks and research journals lay strewn on my desk, all without solutions. Having exhausted every resource available to me, I was back at square one. My determination was flagging, and today was destined to be another fruitless search. \n\tMy solution came as I built a Lego set with my toddler cousin. My interest piqued when she attempted to count the number of Legos in the tower, but mistakenly counted the number of sides. Laughing, I corrected her, when it hit me like a freight train. By visualizing a cancerous cell as a composition of Lego-like structures, I could develop a new surface area algorithm.Through the fog of my elation, I realize that I am no longer reading the book of science; I am writing it.\n\nResearch gave me the gift of creativity: the ability to look at problems through unique perspectives. It still amazes me how Legos, a simple childrens’ toy, helped me diagnose cancer criticality, research I submitted to Intel STS and the Siemens Research Competition, pending publication. I encounter new obstacles more challenging and confounding than ever, but I tackle them with panache."},{"_id":"46a7ab6698be5bc1ea000062","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":373017,"position":9,"parentId":"46a7a32f98be5bc1ea000059","content":"##Note to Roommate\n\nVirtually all of Stanford's undergraduates live on campus. Write a note to your future roommate that reveals something about you or that will help your roommate -- and us -- know you better. (100 to 250 words)"},{"_id":"4e60551fb8ca4383ac00011a","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1415506,"position":0.125,"parentId":"46a7ab6698be5bc1ea000062","content":"\nHey roomie!\n\nWe're going to be best buddies soon, so let me dive into the quirks that define me. \nI don't limit my singing to the shower. Having learned classical music for many years, I melt into the rich Bengali culture of my family through singing. Although Indian and American music often clash, I love singing (offtune) to my favorite modern hits. Beware my tendencies to break into Eminem rap.\nI think best during the night, and I ponder many nights about my research or problems I encounter. If you ever see a dark shadow in the middle of the night lurking outside, don't worry: it isn't a vampire. It's me.\nTinkering, building, and soldering are second nature to me, and I've chased my passion through robotics and microelectronics. I apologize in advance for the dismantled gadgets around our room.\nDon't expect me inside often. When stressed, I pick up my cleats and dive into a soccer game. Breathing in the fresh air, I immerse myself in the serene world around me, and truly live.\nI am a ball of pure energy, and I live with utmost optimism and enthusiasm.I must warn you, it is contagious. Over the next four years, you'll hear some of the best and corniest jokes in my arsenal. To me, the world is a glass completely full, bursting with opportunity. \nOh, but I've babbled on for too long now! Tell me about yourself!"},{"_id":"4e5732ff7bd32aecae000115","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1410142,"position":0.25,"parentId":"46a7ab6698be5bc1ea000062","content":"\nA person is the sum of his or her peculiarities. Since we're going to be best buddies for the next few years, let me introduce to some of the quirks that define me. \nI don't limit my singing to the shower. Having learned classical music for many years, I melt into the rich Bengali culture of my family through singing. Although Indian and American music often clash, I love singing (offtune) to my favorite modern hits. Beware my tendencies to break into Eminem rap.\nI think best during the night, and I ponder many nights about my research or problems I encounter. If you ever see a dark shadow in the middle of the night lurking outside, don't worry: it isn't a vampire. It's me.\nI am a ball of pure energy, and I live with utmost enthusiasm and energy.I must warn you, it is contagious. Over the next four years, you'll hear some of the best and corniest jokes in my arsenal. It's my optimism: to me, the world is a glass completely full. \nTinkering, building, and soldering are second nature to me. I've chased my passion with robots and microelectronics, but it isn't just a hobby; it's a learning perspective. By understanding the functions of the specific parts, I piece together and fully understand how these machines work. \nOh, but I've babbled on for too long now! Tell me about yourself!"},{"_id":"4e5447087bd32aecae000114","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1404770,"position":0.5,"parentId":"46a7ab6698be5bc1ea000062","content":"Many say that a person is the sum of his or her peculiarities. If that's so , my sum is really high. Since we're going to be best buddies for the next couple of years, it's only fair if I tell you a little about myself.\nI think best during the night. Many a night I spend pondering my research problems or whatever is floating across my mind. If you ever wake up in the middle of the night, and see a shadow pondering the complex mysteries of our world, don't worry: it's me.\nMy body is a natural source of caffeine: I am always pumped up and full of energy. Whatever task I perform, I tackle with utmost enthusiasm and energy. I don't know whether it comes from my breakfast cereal ( strictly Honey Bunches of Oats) or just the environment, but I must warn you, it is contagious.\nI tell the corniest jokes in the world. If my passion for mathematics and computer science doesn't pan out, I'm sure to be a comedian. Over the next four years, you'll hear some of my great jokes and some not so great. It all stems in my optimism: I look at the world like a glass completely full, not a glass half empty. \nI make it a habit to wear multiple layers. For a tropical Bay Area dweller like me, any weather but sunny is bad weather, and I have a fear of the cold . I fight back against my frigophobia, and whenever the temperature drops below 50 degrees Farenheit, I'm all suited up, big jacket, warm sweatpants, ready to withstand the weather.\nBut enough about me; tell me about yourself!"},{"_id":"4cff7a270697a6ae06000113","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1404495,"position":1,"parentId":"46a7ab6698be5bc1ea000062","content":" I'm sorry if you don't see me around the dorms a lot. You see, I am a spy. Not CIA, MI6, or KGB, but a hobbyist spy. In my free time, I code to encode. Having learnt from classics like Caesar's cipher and current powerhouses like RSA, I love creating and cracking unbreakable ciphers.\n\n My journey as a spy began with simple invisible messages with lemon juice and invisible marker as a kid. Enthrilled by leaving secrets in plain secrets, I have continued my passions, especially in computer cryptography. Once, irritated because my online storage provider only allowed images not documents, I encoded text into pictures. By manipulating random pixels, I scattered the letters into an image. With this technology, I brought a new meaning to \"a picture is worth a thousand words\".\n\n Cryptography drives me to decipher patterns in the data hidden right in front of my eyes. The thrill of leaving secrets in plain sight never fails to satiate me. If the paranoia that the internet will steal your data infects you, I'm always here. I'll turn your message into a random series of characters which seemingly mean nothing, but to the right pair of eyes, tells a story.\n\nP.S. This message will self-destruct in 10 seconds..."},{"_id":"4d94e543dc0d7002990000f8","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1310010,"position":2,"parentId":"46a7ab6698be5bc1ea000062","content":"Random Musings\nI love cereal. Although I am accepting of all kinds of cereal, Honey Bunches of Oats is my personal favorite\n\nWhen I do eat cereal, I pour cereal onto my milk, and not milk onto my cereal."},{"_id":"46a7abee98be5bc1ea000063","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":373018,"position":10,"parentId":"46a7a32f98be5bc1ea000059","content":"##What Matters\nWhat matters to you, and why? (100 to 250 words)\n"},{"_id":"4e53b36d7bd32aecae000113","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1445300,"position":0.125,"parentId":"46a7abee98be5bc1ea000063","content":"##RD 3\nI remember the day the man fell from the sky. Eyes glued to the live stream, I watched Felix Bumgartener freefall 128,000 feet from space. As his feet touched the earth, I was branded with the importance of daring to go further. Deep inside me bubbles a desire to explore and discover, fueling my inner curiosity. Exploration keeps me invigorated and it intellectually stimulates me. Whether in research, class, or extracurriculars, I express my most vital trait: an insatiable love of exploration.\n\nWhether accidentally making chlorine gas by running electricity through salt water in AP Chemistry or exploding light bulbs by changing the inner environment in AP Physics, my curiosity and ventures in science classes haven't always turned out well. However through these gaffes, I discovered the power of electrolysis and conductive gases. Although creating poisonous gases doesn't get on the teacher's good side, I surpassed the structure of school and learned something new. \n\nThrough my cancer research, I've explored the world around me with intellect and scientific prowess and my love of exploration now drives me to Stanford. I will thrive here, engorging in the diverse atmosphere, classes and research opportunities, but my journey won't end there. Throughout graduate studies and beyond, I hope to continue discovering in the field of mathematics and computer science. For in the end, exploration, is and will be,the only thing that matters to me."},{"_id":"4e49bbf67bd32aecae000111","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1404401,"position":0.25,"parentId":"46a7abee98be5bc1ea000063","content":"##RD 2\n\nI remember the day the man fell from the sky. Spellbound by the live stream, I watched Felix Bumgartener fall 128,000 feet from space. As his feet touched the earth, Bumgartener's jump reminded me of the importance of daring to go further. Deep inside me is a desire to explore and discover, a quirk that pops out in the many things I do.Exploration keeps me invigorated, it intellectually stimulates me, and it appeases my sense of discovery.\n\nThe first step can often be the hardest, and can often backfire. I've attempted to explore throughout my science classes, but my ventures haven't always turned out well, whether accidentally making chlorine gas by running electricity through salt water or exploding light bulbs by changing the inner environment. Behind the gaffes, I discovered the power of electrolysis and conductive gasses. What seemed like \n\n I believe in letting curiousity and discovery control my actions. Through extracurriculars and research, I've explored the world around me with intellect and scientific prowess in mind. My love of exploration now drives me to Stanford. I will thrive here, engorging in the diverse atmosphere, classes and research opportunities. But my journey won't end there. Throughout graduate studies and beyond, I hope to continue discovering in the field of mathematics and computer science. For in the end, exploration, is and will be,the only thing that matters to me."},{"_id":"4e490f7a7bd32aecae000110","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1398969,"position":0.5,"parentId":"46a7abee98be5bc1ea000063","content":"I remember the day the man fell from the sky. My eyes rapt on the live stream, I watched Felix Bumgartener dive 128,000 feet from space. As his feet touched the earth, the world erupted in applause, and mankind advanced to a new level in space exploration. Possibly the moon landing of my generation, Bumgartener's jump reminded me of the importance of daring to go further. Deep inside me is a desire to explore further, to learn more, to go deeper, a passion that I've expressed and continue to express.\nThe first step can often be the hardest. Oftentimes it backfires on you or leads to a dead end. I've attempted to explore and learn throughout my high school science courses, not all to the same avail. Whether accidentally making chlorine gas while electrolyzing water (it was salt water) or exploding light bulbs by changing the inner environment, my scientific ventures haven't always turned out well. Despite the initial embarrassment, I ended up realizing the positive side effects of my discoveries and whatever.\n\n We follow Moore's Law to an extent. Although I'm not stipulating that we're computers and completely logical (we're not), the fact remains that . It is my goal, nay mission, to keep on exploring. As I've done through high school, whether through extracurriculars or research, I've striven to explore the world around me as intellectually as possible. Exploration keeps me invigorated, it intellectually stimulates me, and it appeases my sense of discovery. My love of exploration now drives me to Stanford, and I hope to thrive here, continually discovering. I will engorge in the variety of classes at Stanford and research opportunities. But my journey won't end there. I hope to continue researching, discovering new things in the field of mathematics and computer science never ever imagined before. In the end, to me, exploration is and will be the only thing that matters."},{"_id":"4cff78b80697a6ae06000112","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1186194,"position":1,"parentId":"46a7abee98be5bc1ea000063","content":"See USC (What do you want to study; MIT What do you want to Study)"},{"_id":"46a778b798be5bc1ea000046","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":967817,"position":4.5,"parentId":"46a7776f98be5bc1ea000045","content":"#California Institute of Technology\n*11/1/14 -- Done*"},{"_id":"4a861c5c01c519569d000049","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":918577,"position":0.5,"parentId":"46a778b798be5bc1ea000046","content":"Activities\n\nWhat three experiences or activities have helped you explore your desire to study and possibly pursue a career in STEM? (200 words max)"},{"_id":"4b44d949689b7a78ff000062","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1170490,"position":0.5,"parentId":"4a861c5c01c519569d000049","content":"## Final Draft\n\nArmed with buzzers, we tackle science trivia questions from DNA replication to quantum states in stars. This is Science Bowl, a true test of one's scientific acumen. For every question that stumps me, I take the unknown fact, and file it into my bank of knowledge. Through this repeated pattern of learning, I expand the breadth of my understanding of science.\n I explore the ins and outs of science through research. Delving into the deep dark unknowns of science, I discover and learn . Over the past 6 years, my science fair projects have evolved from physical hardware projects on desalination and sprinkler optimization to researching theoretical mathematical projects like data compression and cancer detection. Currently, I am developing mathematical models of cancer angiogenesis, the effect of cancer on the surrounding blood vessels.\n\n In robotics, I unleash my creativity, creating contraptions that perform my bidding. In my hands, gears, wheels and metal pieces magically come together to form robots. My code breathes life into the robot, and it perks up, spinning around in circles and driving across the floor. Robotics stretches my imagination, and the unlimited potential fuels my spirit of discovery. "},{"_id":"4aa907f80fbf301dbc00004d","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":920218,"position":1,"parentId":"4a861c5c01c519569d000049","content":"##RD 1\nArmed with buzzers, we tackle science trivia questions from quantum mechanics to solar flares. \"Physics, Multiple Choice\" The question deals with positron emission, and remembering the radiation emission rule, I buzz in. \"Incorrect\".I learn about the exception to the rule, and file it into my bank of knowledge. Through Science Bowl, I gain an innate knowledge of science.\n\n As a scientific researcher, I discover the exceptions and delve into the unknowns of science. Over the last 6 years, I have participated in science fairs, advancing from small hardware projects like desalination and sprinkler optimization to full research projects. Currently, I pursue cancer proliferation, and mathematically model how angiogenesis affects the development of a tumor.\n\n In robotics, I find an outlet for creativity. I am a god, and with the building blocks, I create contraptions to perform my bidding. I manipulate objects through just a combination of gears, wheels and metal pieces. Unlike theoretical programming in my research, my code yields practical results. In the VEX competition, I am driven to discover. Outside of robotics, this spirit of discovery drives me in my mathematical research.\n\n"},{"_id":"46a77ba398be5bc1ea00004a","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":849735,"position":1,"parentId":"46a778b798be5bc1ea000046","content":"##Books I've Read\n\nPlease list three books, along with their authors, that have been particularly meaningful to you. For each book, please include a sentence explaining their influence upon you. Please note that your response is not limited to math, science or school-assigned texts."},{"_id":"4b45151c689b7a78ff000063","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":920318,"position":0.5,"parentId":"46a77ba398be5bc1ea00004a","content":"### 1984 by George Orwell\nAs the Brotherhood fights against thoughtcrime, I am inspired to think critically and reflect.\n\n### Freakonomics by Steven Levitt\nA collection of interesting statistical trends, this book revealed the power of statistics to me.\n\n### Mathematical Biology: An Introduction by J.D. Murray\nThis textbook piqued my interest in cancer modelling and laid the foundation for my research.\n"},{"_id":"471c58c16716334e8300002a","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":920292,"position":1,"parentId":"46a77ba398be5bc1ea00004a","content":"###Possible Books \n ### 1984 \nThe Brotherhood fighting against thoughtcrime drives me to think critically and reflect.\n\n### Freakonomics \nA collection of trends in major problems discerned from simple data helped me understand the power of statistics\n\n\n###Brave New World -- \n\n\n### Mathematical Biology: An Introduction \nThis college textbook helped me lay the foundation for my research project in cancer modelling\n"},{"_id":"46a77e4798be5bc1ea00004b","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":922945,"position":2,"parentId":"46a778b798be5bc1ea000046","content":"##Honor Code Essay\n\nMembers of the Caltech community live, learn, and work within an Honor System with one simple guideline; 'No member shall take unfair advantage of any other member of the Caltech community.' While seemingly simple, questions of ethics, honesty and integrity are sometimes puzzling. Share a difficult situation that has challenged you. What was your response, and how did you arrive at a solution? (200 word max)"},{"_id":"4b43a3c6689b7a78ff00005e","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1179083,"position":0.5,"parentId":"46a77e4798be5bc1ea00004b","content":"## Final Draft\nTen kids stare at me, eagerly awaiting for the first question. \"Welcome to the final elimination round\". The last step in my quest to create a competitive Science Bowl team, I will select the top 4 to move on to the regional competition with me.\n\nBeginning the competition with a physics question, I barely have time to read it before Arjun buzzes in with the right answer. He buzzes in again correctly as I ask the next two questions. Arjun, with his expansive knowledge of physics, is heavily favored to advance, and the early questions have proved this. As the competition continues, almost all the points go to Arjun, and a suspicion creeps into my head. My worst fears are confirmed when I find the answers loaded on his iPhone.\n\nStuck with a choice between a more competitive team and my moral code, I resist my desire for a stronger team, and remove Arjun from the competition. Although one of the strongest competitors, he broke the unity of the team by cheating. We may be academically weaker now, but by promoting trust and cooperation over immoral performance, I know I have made the right choice."},{"_id":"46a7cea411dda4c71b000028","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":919667,"position":1,"parentId":"46a77e4798be5bc1ea00004b","content":"## RD 1\nTen kids stared at me, hands on buzzers, waiting for the first question. \"Welcome to the final elimination round\". In my quest to create an elite team for Science Bowl, I recruited and coached students versed in all scientific disciples. Yet only 4 of the 10 competing would move on to the regional competition. \n\n\"Physics, Short Answer\". I had just finished asking the question, when my close friend and aspiring competitor buzzed in. \"Weak Force\" \"Correct\". I had not finished reading the second question when John buzzed in, again with the correct answer. \"Are you guys even trying?\", I joked. A suspicion creeped in when my friend answered the third question correctly. Then the fourth and fifth. My worst suspicions were confirmed when I saw an iPhone cleverly hidden in his hands. \n\nPerhaps one of the hardest decisions I have ever made, I effectively sacrificed our friendship by eliminating him from the running. John would easily have qualified , yet his choice to cheat broke my trust, and severely weakened our friendship. Our team has yet to compete, yet I am sure that I have made the right choice, by promoting team trust and cooperation over a need to immorally overperform."},{"_id":"46a77f3998be5bc1ea00004c","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":838219,"position":3,"parentId":"46a778b798be5bc1ea000046","content":"## Fun and Pranking\n\nCaltech students have long been known for their quirky sense of humor, whether it be through planning creative pranks, building elaborate party sets, or even the year-long preparation that goes into our annual Ditch Day. Please describe an unusual way in which you have fun. "},{"_id":"4b4abd867a128715de00006c","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1364803,"position":0.25,"parentId":"46a77f3998be5bc1ea00004c","content":"##Final Draft\nI am a spy. Not CIA, MI6, or KGB, but a hobbyist spy. When I'm not caught up in my academic life, I code to encode. Learning from classics like Caesar's cipher and current powerhouses like RSA, I strive to create the next unbreakable cipher from the ground up .\n\nUnlike lemon juice and invisible marker I used as a kid spy, I have learned new software techniques to hide messages. Once, irritated because my online storage provider only allowed images not documents, I encoded text into pictures. By manipulating random pixels, I cleverly scattered the letters around the image. With this technology, I brought a new meaning to \"a picture is worth a thousand words\".\n\nEncryption is more than a hobby to me. Cryptography drives me to decipher patterns in the data hidden right in front of my eyes. The thrill of leaving secrets in plain sight never fails to satiate me. I'll turn a message into a random series of characters which seemingly mean nothing. To the right pair of eyes,however, they tell a story."},{"_id":"4b17b1002fc382fb30000053","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":923056,"position":0.5,"parentId":"46a77f3998be5bc1ea00004c","content":"##RD 2\nI am a spy. Not CIA, MI6, or KGB, but a hobbyist spy. When I’m not caught up in my academic life, I code to encode. Learning from classics like Caesar's cipher and current powerhouses like RSA, I strive to create the next unbreakable cipher from the ground up .\n\nUnlike my previous life as a kid spy, I have learned techniques other than lemon juice or invisible marker to hide messages. Once, irritated because my online storage provider only allowed images not documents, I encoded text into pictures. By manipulating random pixels, I cleverly scattered the letters around the image. With this technology, I bring a new meaning to \"a picture is worth a thousand words\".\n\nEncryption is more than a hobby to me. Cryptography drives me to decipher patterns in the data hidden right in front of our eyes. The thrill of leaving secrets in plain sight never fails to satiate me. I'll turn a message into a seemingly random series of characters. To the passerby, they mean nothing. To the right pair of eyes, they tell a story. "},{"_id":"46bdff74bae38ee161000029","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":919708,"position":1,"parentId":"46a77f3998be5bc1ea00004c","content":"##RD 1\nI am a spy. Not CIA, MI6, KGB, but a hobbyist spy. When I’m not busy solving differential equations or modelling cancer angiogenesis, I code to encode. From classics like Caesar’s cipher to current powerhouses like RSA to military level Blowfish algorithms, name an encryption algorithm, its probably in my arsenal.\n\nPerhaps my favorite form of cryptography is through images. Unlike in the novel The Da Vinci Code, which sparked my interest in encryption, you don’t have to write with invisible marker on famous paintings to send messages. I developed a method of hiding messages through random pixel manipulation in images. Through these methods, I once hid the entire text of Les Miserables in just the cover art. \n\nFor me, cryptography is more than a hobby, it’s my method of finding patterns in the world, and trying to figure out what data is hidden right in front of our eyes, yet we fail to recognize. The thrill of hiding secrets in plain sight never fails to satiate me. Give me a message, and I’ll give you a series of random characters that mean nothing, but to the right pair of eyes, tells a story. \n\n200 words\n"},{"_id":"46a7944998be5bc1ea00004e","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":909436,"position":3.5,"parentId":"46a778b798be5bc1ea000046","content":"##Diversity\n\nIn an increasingly global and interdependent society, there is a need for diversity in thought, background, and experience in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. How do you see yourself contributing to the diversity of Caltech's community? (200 word max)"},{"_id":"4b4ad4a77a128715de00006d","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1179087,"position":0.125,"parentId":"46a7944998be5bc1ea00004e","content":"##Final Draft\n\nMy face drops as I see the projects competing against us in the science fair. Standing next to these complex engineering projects, my sun-tracking solar panel feels unsophisticated and unlikely to win. I still hold a trump card though: the verbal presentation. I overcome the obstacles I face in STEM fields through the unique pathway of public speaking.\n\nThe judge approaches, and I dive into the presentation. My passion for the topic bleeds into my speech. I enthusiastically describe the scientific concepts like parallax and bio-mimicry that reveal the intense research underlying my project. Self-reflecting on the experiment, I address flaws in my data-collecting procedures and discuss possible solutions. By connecting my discoveries with real-world applications, I relate the data to my goals and conclude my presentation.\n\nThe judge walks away with a smile on his face, and I realize that my speech has successfully captivated him, elevating me to the 1st place medal. I marvel at the power of speech and its ability to persuade. Effective communication is my secret weapon and public speaking is my mindset. These two unique aspects pave the path I walk today."},{"_id":"4b43f39a689b7a78ff00005f","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":923058,"position":0.25,"parentId":"46a7944998be5bc1ea00004e","content":"## RD 3\n\nMy face drops as I see the projects competing against us in the science fair. Standing next to these complex engineering projects, my sun-tracking solar panel feels unsophisticated and unlikely to win. Yet,I still hold a trump card: the judged verbal presentation. As a student of speech, I overcome the obstacles I face in STEM through the unique pathway of public speaking, . \n\nThe judge approaches, and I dive into the presentation. My passion for the topic bleeds into my speech. I enthusiastically describe the scientific concepts like parallax and biomimicry that underlie our project, revealing the intense research undertaken. Self-reflecting on the experiment, I address flaws in my data-collecting procedures and discuss possible solutions. By connecting my discoveries with real-world applications, I reach closure with my project and conclude my presentation. \n\nThe judge walks away with a smile on his face, and I realize that my speech was successful: it informed and captivated him, elevating me to the 1st place medal. I marvel at the power of speech: its ability to persuade and compel . Effective communication is my secret weapon, public speaking my mindset, two unique aspects that paves the path I walk today. "},{"_id":"4b298c392fc382fb30000056","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":919704,"position":0.5,"parentId":"46a7944998be5bc1ea00004e","content":"##RD 2\n\nMy face drops as I see the projects competing against us in the science fair. Standing next to these complex engineering projects, my sun-tracking solar panel feels unsophisticated and unlikely to win. Yet, I still hold a trump card: the judged presentation. As a master of public speaking, my ability to clearly communicate my ideas through speech drives my successes in STEM fields. \n\nThe judge approaches, and dispensing all formalities, I dive into the presentation. My passion for the topic bleeds through my speech and infects the judge. He expresses admiration at my innate understanding of my topic as I describe the scientific concepts underlying our project. I address flaws in the experiment and data,and the judge is impressed by this self-reflection. I conclude my presentation by connecting our discoveries with real-world applications. Firmly shaking my hand, the judge walks away. \n\nFrom afar, I see the judge smiling to himself, and I know that my speech was successful. My presentation informed and captivated the judges, elevating me above my competition. 1st place trophy in hand, I marvel at the power of speech: its ability to persuade and compel. Effective communication is my secret weapon, and has paved the path to the success I enjoy today. "},{"_id":"48df2175fcff8c224d00003b","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":923057,"position":1,"parentId":"46a7944998be5bc1ea00004e","content":"##RD 1\n “99% of the population is afraid of public speaking, and of the remaining 1%, 99% have nothing interesting to say.” Perhaps my most integral and unique characteristic, my public speaking ability has enhanced and driven my successes in STEM fields. \n\n\nAfter months of experimenting, my research team presented an optimized solar panel in the 9th grade science fair.To our dismay, our project was one of the least sophisticated in our division. Yet, in our presentation, we projected clarity and showed our intricate understanding of our topic. Our stellar presentation earned us the highest honor in our division.\n\nI believe in the power of public speaking in complementing science. At Caltech, I will continue to develop my elocution and communication ability. In the future, with public speaking, I will collaborate with my research team, communicate my results with fellow scientists, and publicize my results to the world. \n192 words\n"},{"_id":"46a7952f98be5bc1ea00004f","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":909435,"position":3.75,"parentId":"46a778b798be5bc1ea000046","content":"##Scientific Exploration\n\nScientific exploration clearly excites you. Beyond our 3:1 student-to-faculty ratio and our intense focus on research opportunities, how do you believe Caltech will best fuel your intellectual curiosity and help you meet your goals? (500 word max)"},{"_id":"4b444179689b7a78ff000061","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1356039,"position":0.125,"parentId":"46a7952f98be5bc1ea00004f","content":"## Final Draft\n've hit a wall. Scanning research articles and my code for weeks hasn't made any headway, yet the algorithm seems tantalizingly close. I reflect upon the transformation of my simple mammogram processing research into automated breast cancer detection. Yet, one key aspect of my research, detecting irregularities, still eludes me. The solution strikes 4,000 ft up a mountain, miles away from the technology that propels my research.\n\nKneeling down by a creek to quench my thirst, a sight catches my eye. In my peripherals, rainfall trickles through the dirt and accumulates on the surface. Racing with ideas, I theorize that simulated rainfall on a system would accumulate near the cancerous abnormalities. Small observations like these trigger my best inspirations. At Caltech, I will work with my fellow students to find simple solutions for the complex problems I encounter in class and research.\n\nWith only pen and notepad, I flesh out the rainfall idea into a practical abnormality detector. Borrowing algorithms from my EdX and Coursera data analysis courses, I create a prototype of the rainfall algorithm, which is slow and inefficient. Utilizing a design review I learned from robotics, I repetitively optimize the code, and explore alternative algorithms to enhance my design. At Caltech, professors of applied mathematics and other scientific disciplines will teach me new statistical analysis techniques to further enhance the ideas that I derive.\n\nHunched over a laptop, furiously typing code for hours, my research comes to life. I design simulations and experiments to test whether the problem is fixed. Fetching a few abnormal cancerous images, my detection algorithm boots up, and the test begins. \"30% complete.\" Anxiety claws at me. \"60%\" . Nervousness racks my body, and the progress counter seems to slow down. \"100%\". Finally, the program exits, and I quickly scan the results. One line pops out \"Cancer status: positive; Type: Abnormal Lesion.\" I leap up out of my chair in excitement and celebrate the success of my algorithm.The significance of my success hits me.I am no longer reading the book of science. I am writing it.\n\nResearch drives me to discover and pursue society's problems. My enthusiasm for research will bleed into my peers at Caltech, and together we will discuss problem sets and our endeavors outside of classes. I will frequent the Annenburg Center to glean knowledge from my esteemed professors. As I brainstorm answers to my research questions sitting next to the turtle pond, perhaps the sight of a turtle poking its head above a lily will inspire a solution. Caltech's academic rigor and supportive family will best prepare me for my future in graduate school and research beyond. In ten years, with my knowledge in mathematics from Caltech, I hope to be tackling the world's problems and making a difference.\n"},{"_id":"4b16f663da6b1a3636000052","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":919846,"position":0.25,"parentId":"46a7952f98be5bc1ea00004f","content":"##RD 2\nI've hit a wall. Scanning research articles and my code for weeks haven't made any headway, yet the algorithm seems tantalizingly close. I reminisce upon the transformation of my simple mammogram processing research into automated breast cancer detection. Yet, one key aspect of my research, detecting irregularities, still eludes me. The solution strikes 4,000 ft up a mountain, miles away from the technology that propels my research.\n\nKneeling down by a creek to quench my thirst, a sight caught my eye. In my peripherals, rainfall trickles through the dirt and accumulated on the dirt at the surface. Racing with ideas, I theorize that simulated rainfall on a system would accumulate near the cancerous abnormalities. Small observations like these trigger my best inspirations. At Caltech, I will work with my fellow students to find simple solutions for the complex problems I encounter in class and research.\n\nThrough an iterative design review, my process to optimize the solution. Initially, my cancer image analysis was slow and inefficient. By repetitively making small optimizations in the code, and choosing slightly faster algorithm in the code, I sped up the code by over 200%. At Caltech, professors of applied mathematics and other scientific disciplines will teach me new statistical analysis techniques to further enhance the ideas that I derive.\n\n Hunched over a laptop, furiously typing code for hours, my research comes to life. I design simulations and experiments to test whether the problem is fixed. Fetching a few abnormal cancerous images, I boot up my detection algorithm, and the test begins. \"30% complete.\" Anxiety claws at me. \"60%\" . The progress counter seemingly slows down as nervousness. \"100%\". The program exits, and as I scan the results, one line pops out \"Cancer status: positive; Type: Abnormal Lesion.\" I leap up out of my chair in euphoria and celebrate the hard-earned success of my algorithm. After the initial elation wears off, the significance of my success hits me. I am no longer reading the book of science. I am writing it.\n\n Research drives me to discover and inspires me to pursue society's problems. My enthusiasm for research will bleed into my peers at Caltech, and together we will discuss problem sets and our endeavors outside of classes. I will frequent the Annenburg Center to glean knowledge from my esteemed professors. As I brainstorm answers to my research questions, perhaps the sight of a turtle poking its head above a lily in the turtle pond will inspire a solution. Caltech's academic rigor and supportive family will best prepare me for my life in research, and hopefully in ten years, with my knowledge in mathematics from Caltech, I hope to be solving future problems and making a difference.\n\n"},{"_id":"4a93f5e29f5f5d190100004c","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":901551,"position":0.5,"parentId":"46a7952f98be5bc1ea00004f","content":"##RD 1 \n At first, it was nothing big, simply an image recognition project. However, countless machine learning lectures and a magical news article evolved my imaging software into a sophisticated breast cancer detection algorithm.\n\n Inspired by recent advances in mammography, I research to find connections between cancer proliferation and mammographic image to speed up and automate breast cancer detection. I am armed with a notepad nested in my back pocket, a disappearing blue ballpoint pen, and a bulky laptop computer that contains a lifetime worth of computer projects. I tackle issues in my research by subdividing the problem , developing small solutions for each part, and establishing a cohesive solution by integrating the individual parts. Equipped with these tools and strategy, I have spent the last 2 years pursuing this field of research.\n\n My best inspirations come from small observations, so when ideas strike, I capture them in my notepad. While hiking one day, I noticed a trickle of rainfall that could model an aspect of breast cancer detection. Simulation of rainfall in the environment allowed me to find abnormalities in tumors, and served as the cornerstone for my work. At Caltech, I will collaborate with my fellow intellectuals to find simple solutions for the problems I encounter in class and in research.\n\nI tweak my ideas through an iterative design review, my process to optimize the solution. Initially, my cancer image analysis was slow and inefficient. By repetitively making small optimizations in the code, and choosing slightly faster algorithm in the code, I sped up the code by over 200%. From the professors of applied mathematics in the CMS department at Caltech, I will learn new statistical analysis techniques and design processes to further enhance the ideas that I derive.\n\n The most thrilling part of research is seeing my solutions come to life. I design simulations and experiments to test whether the problem is fixed. As I code on my slow laptop, I am constantly reminded of the importance of speed and efficiency. When a test succeeds, as small my new discovery may be, it fills me with elation. At that point, I realize I have ceased reading the book of science. Now, I am writing it.\n\nMy academic drive is focused upon scientific research with applied mathematics. At Caltech, I will expand my arsenal to tackle the problems and challenges I meet in research. I will learn from the experts in my field, and discuss problem sets and techniques with my fellow students. Through SURF, I will gain experience in an research environment. Hopefully, in ten years, with my knowledge and experience in mathematics from Caltech, I will be solving future problems and making a difference.\n\n"},{"_id":"46a7796598be5bc1ea000047","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":967818,"position":6,"parentId":"46a7776f98be5bc1ea000045","content":"#Massachusetts Institute of Technology\n*11/1/14 -- Done*"},{"_id":"50591c5832d41d2efb000157","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1687545,"position":0.125,"parentId":"46a7796598be5bc1ea000047","content":"February"},{"_id":"50591c9c32d41d2efb000158","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1687559,"position":1,"parentId":"50591c5832d41d2efb000157","content":"Despite the short period of time that has elapsed since I submitted my application, I've managed to make progress in my extracurriculars and my research. \nTwo weeks ago, I led our science bowl team to the regional competition. Our team this year was younger, yet our solid performance in a very tough pool indicated that my efforts at teaching AP level science classes to high school freshman and sophomores were successful. \nI competed in a Model United Nations conference last weekend in San Jose, CA. Here, representing the country of China in the International Atomic Energy Association,I received the Best Delegation award. Over that weekend, not only did I win the committee, I learned to be a better problem solver and diplomat.\nIn December, I participated in a Mathleague competition representing my high school. Here, at the regional competition, I advanced to the state level for both team and individual events. \nThis year, I was selected to be a starting prosecution attorney for our Mock Trial program, a distinction granted to only 10% of people who sign up for the class. Currently, we are in the county level competition.\nMy fight against cancer continues.. Although I didn't recieve any awards from the Intel STS or Siemens program, I am still pursuing publication from a biomedical journal. Furthermore, I have shifted the focus on my cancer angiogenesis research to a memoryless simulation. This project, which I hope to submit to ISEF, will optimize the cancer proliferation modelling to a greater extent.\n\n\n"},{"_id":"4b3a6d572fc382fb3000005d","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":917809,"position":0.25,"parentId":"46a7796598be5bc1ea000047","content":"##Activities\n\n(40 Words Each)"},{"_id":"4b3a6e092fc382fb3000005f","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":917812,"position":1,"parentId":"4b3a6d572fc382fb3000005d","content":"Robotics: The unofficial vice president, member of the Alpha team and the lead programmer, I build and program robots to compete in VEX Robotics Competitions. Since freshman year, I've expanded the program, and taught newbies the essentials of robotics.\n\nScience Research: I model vascular growth triggered by cancerous cells using applied mathematics , a project submitted to Intel STS. As the president of our school's Honors Science Society, I mentor others' science fair projects and drive fellow students to conduct research.\n\nScience Bowl: I am the president (formerly copresident) of the club, teaching facts from all scientific disciplines to fellow members through fast paced questions. Together, we compete in the DoE Science Bowl, where I captain the team.\n\nMarching Band: Our marching band competes in field show competitions across California. Through the fall, we practice for 17 hours each week, perfecting our marching and playing technique. I am the flute section leader, and I teach and lead 5 other flutes.\n\nModel United Nations: Representing countries at conferences at Stanford, UC Berkeley and more, I debate current world issues. Through Model United Nations, I discovered my passion for public speaking. I develop a great understanding of world politics and pertinent global issues through MUN."},{"_id":"4b29c3022fc382fb30000058","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":909425,"position":0.5,"parentId":"46a7796598be5bc1ea000047","content":"##Cultural Background \nPlease tell us more about your cultural background and identity in the space below (100 word limit)."},{"_id":"4b3297a62fc382fb3000005b","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":922389,"position":1,"parentId":"4b29c3022fc382fb30000058","content":"## Final Draft\n\"Sa re ga ma\" My voice moves smoothly with the harmonium, kicking off an evening of Bengali music. The tunes of Rabindranath Tagore and Kazi Nazrul Islam float throughout the house. As our vocal cords harmonize, we come closer together as a family. We celebrate pujas with festive spirit, poetry recitals, singalongs, firecrackers, and of course savory treats. During the festivals, I am in a completely different realm: a miniature India. When I step back into the world, I keep my Bengali heritage close to my heart."},{"_id":"4b4850c27a128715de000065","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":921949,"position":0.75,"parentId":"46a7796598be5bc1ea000047","content":"##Research Supplement"},{"_id":"4b4851177a128715de000066","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1352529,"position":1,"parentId":"4b4850c27a128715de000065","content":"##Summarize your contributions to this project. What were the specific tasks that you were involved in?*\n\nThis research project is entirely my own. I came up with the idea by myself, inspired by contemporary research in the field. After learning from online courses and studying scientific journals, I designed the model for my research. I was solely responsible for coding the algorithms and their supporting frameworks. I modeled my testing process off previous research, but I had to redesign major portions due to incompatibilities. I wrote the full research paper for this project, although I recieved editing help from my family.\n\nTo fully understand the work, I contacted mathematics and computer science professors for clarification. My primary outside contact was Dr. Kamalika Chaudhuri (UC San Diego), who helped me design my partial differential equation solver in my research and also critiqued my research paper. Data was obtained from other research articles and the SEER database (National Cancer Institute). With these two exceptions, my research was fully self-driven and done by myself.\n\n##What did you learn about the research process and your research interests?*\n\nPrevious to this research project, I had done science fair projects for 5 years, all on varied problems, yet with a common thread. These previous projects helped me hone my research interests to the computer science/ mathematics categories, yet as I conducted my research, I found myself tending more towards the applied mathematics aspect. Computer science became a tool that I could use to apply mathematics to my project. "},{"_id":"476a47ec3ecc361e9e00008f","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":451980,"position":1,"parentId":"46a7796598be5bc1ea000047","content":"##Activities\nWe know you lead a busy life, full of activities, many of which are required of you. Tell us about something you do for the pleasure of it. (*)(100 words or fewer)"},{"_id":"48d9ae57fcff8c224d000033","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1179096,"position":1,"parentId":"476a47ec3ecc361e9e00008f","content":"## Final Draft\n\nA glint of silver flashes down my arm. With my shako set, I march onto the glistening grass. The stadium looms in front of me, crowded with spectators and judges. As the drum major's hands go up, my flute snaps up to attention. Brought together by a passion for music, the marching band around me has become my family. Alone, we are ants with tiny voices. Together, we are unified, a group with a single voice and a single mind. On the field, we make more than music. We make memories.\n\n"},{"_id":"476a48883ecc361e9e000090","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1156971,"position":2,"parentId":"46a7796598be5bc1ea000047","content":"##Department\n\nAlthough you may not yet know what you want to major in, which department or program at MIT appeals to you and why? (*) (100 words or fewer)"},{"_id":"4b4889887a128715de000067","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1179106,"position":0.25,"parentId":"476a48883ecc361e9e000090","content":"## Final Draft\nParlez vous mathématiques? Mathematics is my language, a set of numbers and equations I can order to describe everything in the world around me. In my research, I harness applied mathematics to understand cancer proliferation, and my discoveries in this field showcase the power of math. Through Course 18 at MIT, I hope to gain fluency in the magnificent tacklelanguage of mathematics to help me the world's most complex problems."},{"_id":"4b29bfa62fc382fb30000057","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1160002,"position":0.5,"parentId":"476a48883ecc361e9e000090","content":"##RD 2\nParlez vous mathématiques? Mathematics is my language, a set of numbers and equations I can order to describe anything in the world around me .In my research, I harness the power of applied mathematics to understand cancer proliferation. My mathematical models evaluate the growth of blood vessels in cancerous cells, and my discoveries in this field impress the power of math upon me. At MIT, through Course 18, I will continue learning the magnificent language of mathematics to help me tackle the problems of the future. "},{"_id":"48da09defcff8c224d000034","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":909259,"position":1,"parentId":"476a48883ecc361e9e000090","content":"##RD 1\nParlez vous mathématiques? To me, mathematics is a language, a jumble of numbers and equations. When ordered and combined, these potent symbols describe the world around me.Through applied mathematics, I describe and discover scientific phenomena and problems. In my research on cancer proliferation, my mathematical models help me evaluate the effect of growth-inducing chemicals on cancerous cells. At MIT, I will continue applying mathematics to tackle real world applications through Course 18. "},{"_id":"476a49e83ecc361e9e000091","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":922378,"position":3,"parentId":"46a7796598be5bc1ea000047","content":"##Personality\n\nWhat attribute of your personality are you most proud of, and how has it impacted your life so far? This could be your creativity, effective leadership, sense of humor, integrity, or anything else you'd like to tell us about. (*) (200-250 words)"},{"_id":"4b49b27f7a128715de00006a","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1179107,"position":0.125,"parentId":"476a49e83ecc361e9e000091","content":"##Final Draft\n\nA sea of suits crowds the auditorium. Pacing back and forth on stage, I prepare to deliver my speech on drone technology. This is Model United Nations, where delegates represent countries from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe to resolve world problems. Here, I feed my obsession with public speaking, a vital part of my personality that shapes my world. I sharpen my ability to enthrall through speech.\n \"Saudi Arabia, you have 2 minutes.\" When I speak, I am a painter. My words are brushstrokes, and the speech is my painting. I sketch a background of drone use in wars, the foundation for my speech. Looking the audience in the eye, I paint the deplorable humanitarian situations in areas ravaged by drones in a dark hue. Hand gestures accompany the slow but clear pace of my speech. My voice thunders across the auditorium as I incite the delegates to deal with the drone crisis immediately.\n“Time’s up!” Stepping off my podium, I realize that my speech has captivated my fellow delegates. Whether in MUN or my scientific pursuits, I create long lasting impressions through my presentations. At robotics competitions, I enthusiastically describe the design of our robot to sponsors and judges. Discussing my research with peers, I clearly explain my methods and my discoveries. Public speaking has helped me understand the importance of effective communication. Whenever I speak, I'm always on the stage, aspiring to inform, entrance and captivate. \n"},{"_id":"4b466b517a128715de000064","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":922023,"position":0.25,"parentId":"476a49e83ecc361e9e000091","content":"##RD 3\n A sea of black suits crowds the classroom. Surrounded by well-dressed delegates representing countries from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe, I prepare my speech regarding drone technology. This is Model UN, a fast paced simulation of the United Nations. My talkative nature excels here, allowing me to powerfully communicate through public speaking.\n\n An air of calmness surrounds me when I step onto the stage. \"Saudi Arabia, you have 2 minutes.\" I am a painter, my words brushstrokes, the speech my painting. I discuss my country's policy, connecting drones with the war in the Middle East. In a dark dismal hue, I paint the deplorable humanitarian situations in areas with drones . My voice tinges with hope as I discuss possible solutions to the crisis like bans or sanctions , and a bright complexion emerges out of the painting. I put on the final touches, concluding with a call to action to join me in banning drones.\n\n“Time’s Up!” The nods of approval across the crowd make me realize that my speech achieved its goal:informing and inspiring my fellow delegates. Outside of MUN, my chatty talkative nature expresses itself in scientific fields. At robotics competitions, I enthusiastically describe the design of our robot to sponsors and judges. I can rattle on and on about my research, talking about my methods, my results, or their practical applications. No matter where I am, my love of talking affects the way I act. When I speak, I'm always on the stage, aspiring to entrance and captivate. "},{"_id":"4b251eabda6b1a3636000054","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":922362,"position":0.5,"parentId":"476a49e83ecc361e9e000091","content":"##RD 2 \n A sea of suits crowds the lectern where I will give my address. Surrounded by well-dressed delegates representing countries from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe, I prepare my speech discussing drone technology. This is Model UN, a fast paced simulation of the United Nations. Driven by a sociable and talkative attitude, I excel here, honing my ability to powerfully communicate through public speaking.\n 4 years of MUN have acclimated me to the stress , and an air of calmness surrounds me on the stage. \"Saudi Arabia, you have 2 minutes\" Launching into my presentation, I bring up little known facts, eliciting responses of wonder. The interest of the crowd piques when I connect with the situation in Syria. Shifting tone, I deplore the poor humanitarian situations in drone strike areas. Inciting my fellow delegates to action,I urge the committee to permanently ban drones . \n\n“Time’s Up!” Seeing the nods of approval across the crowd, I know that I've won over my audience. The speech not only informed my fellow delegates, it also captivated them. Wherever I go, I attempt to create lasting impressions through my presentations. In robotics, I am a storyteller, walking people through the design of our robot. When I discuss my research with peers, I inspire by expounding on the relevance of the discoveries I made. My innate love for public speech affects the way I act, and no matter where I am, I'm always on the stage, attempting to entrance and captivate."},{"_id":"4aad1f63be398fc35900004e","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":922025,"position":1,"parentId":"476a49e83ecc361e9e000091","content":" “99% of the population is afraid of public speaking, and of the remaining 1%, 99% have nothing interesting to say.” An unique characteristic that defines me, my public speaking skill changes the way I view and tackle problems.\n\nIn 9th grade, after months of experimenting, my research team finished developing an optimized solar panel. To our dismay our project was less sophisticated than many in our division. Yet, when the judges came, our presentation exuded enthusiasm, projected clarity, and showed the innate understanding of our topic. Thanks to the power of communication, we earned the highest honor in our division.\n\nMy eloquent elocution is most useful in Model United Nations. Over the last 4 years, I have represented countries from radicals like Syria to powerhouses like France. Together with my fellow delegates, we resolve world problems, and prevent crises (like Russia taking over the world). I lead discussion for these topics and help coordinate the many members in the council.\n\n My various escapades in high schools have instilled in me the power of speech: its ability to persuade and compel. At MIT, I will develop communication through various clubs like MITMUN. "},{"_id":"4b49b23f7a128715de000069","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":922379,"position":2,"parentId":"476a49e83ecc361e9e000091","content":""},{"_id":"48daad5efcff8c224d000036","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":887487,"position":3.5,"parentId":"46a7796598be5bc1ea000047","content":"Describe the world you come from; for example, your family, clubs, school, community, city, or town. How has that world shaped your dreams and aspirations?(*) (200-250 words)"},{"_id":"4b49ccba7a128715de00006b","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1415855,"position":0.25,"parentId":"48daad5efcff8c224d000036","content":"##Final Draft\nThe truncated icosahedron skips down the field. I break into a sprint, and maneuver the soccer ball past the defender. Only the goalie stands between me and a hat-trick. Aiming for the top corner of the goal, I lean back and shoot.\n\nFrom dawn to dusk, I inhabit a world of academics and scientific discovery. My rigorous AP classes sate my thirst for challenge. Firing abstruse details at me like machine gun fire, teachers bombard me with lectures. By quickly making connections with what I learn, I cope with this influx of knowledge. Although stressful, this stream of new information fuels my drive to discover.\n\nMy life in academia is punctuated by brief moments of nature that reinvigorate me. Leaving my stress and AP textbooks at home, I pick up my soccer cleats and dive into a soccer game. My worries don't follow me onto the soccer field. Breathing in the fresh air, I immerse myself in the serene world around me, and truly live.\n\n“Clang!” The ball ricochets off the crossbar. I pursue the loose ball again, shoot , and this time, the ball meets the back of the net. Whether it takes one shot or hundred, I attack my problems till I conquer them. From academia, I develop a toolbox of knowledge. From nature, I find inspiration to persevere. Together, these worlds drive me forward to make the world a better place.\n"},{"_id":"4b0ee03d1a558c78db000051","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":922396,"position":0.5,"parentId":"48daad5efcff8c224d000036","content":"##RD 2\nThe truncated icosahedron skips down the field. I break into a sprint, and manuever the soccer ball past the defender. Only the goalie stands between me and a hat-trick. Aiming for the top corner of the goal, I lean back and shoot.\nFrom dawn to dusk, I inhabit a world of academics and scientific discovery. My rigorous AP classes sate my thirst for challenge. Firing abstruse details at me like machine gun fire, teachers bombard me with lectures. By quickly making connections in what I learn, I cope with this influx of knowledge. Although stressful, this stream of new information fuels my drive to discover.\nMy life in academia is punctuated by brief moments of nature that reinvigorate me. Leaving my stress and AP textbooks at home, I pick up my soccer cleats and go to play ball. On the crisp green grass, I dive into a pickup soccer game. Stress doesn't follow me onto the soccer field. Breathing in the fresh air, I immerse myself into the serene world around me, and truly live.\n“Clang!” The ball ricochets off the crossbar. Unfazed, I pursue the loose ball, shoot again, and the ball meets the back of the net. Whether it takes one shot or hundred, I will attack my problems till I best them. From academia, I develop a toolbox of knowledge. From nature, I find inspiration to persevere. Together, these worlds drive me forward to research and tackle the problems of the future.\n\n"},{"_id":"4ac87de5be398fc359000050","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":915431,"position":1,"parentId":"48daad5efcff8c224d000036","content":"##RD 1\nThe truncated icosahedron skips down the field. I break into a dead sprint to get the soccer ball before the defender does. Past the defender now, only the goalie stands between me and a hat-trick. Aiming for the top corner of the goal, I wind up and drive my power into the ball. \nFrom dawn to dusk, I inhabit a world of academics and scientific discovery. I feed on challenge and my rigorous AP classes sate my thirst for knowledge. I am pummeled with lecture after lecture, and abstruse details are shot at me like machine gun fire. Abstruse questions to make connections in the material. \n\nMy life in academia is punctuated by brief moments of nature that revitalize me. Leaving my stress and AP textbooks at home, I pick up my cleats and march to the soccer field. I live, laugh, and enjoy the small pickup game with friends.\nThe ball flies towards its destination, but the menacing goalie blocks it. “Clang!” It ricochets off the crossbar. Unfazed, I pursue the ball, shoot again, and score. Whether it takes one shot or a hundred, I will continue attacking my problems till I best them. From nature, I find the patience and inspiration to persevere. From science, I develop the knowledge to help me conquer the problem. Together, these worlds drive me to tackle world problems of the future.\n"},{"_id":"48daad7cfcff8c224d000037","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1316533,"position":3.75,"parentId":"46a7796598be5bc1ea000047","content":"Tell us about the most significant challenge you've faced or something important that didn't go according to plan. How did you manage the situation?(*) (200-250 words) "},{"_id":"4b49015b7a128715de000068","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1324496,"position":0.25,"parentId":"48daad7cfcff8c224d000037","content":"## Final Draft\n\n\"Completion time: 1000 minutes\" I pore through the code over and over, the algorithm burned into my brain by now. For weeks, I have studied research articles and experiment with alternative algorithms, but have made no headway. Just outside my grasp, the optimal algorithm dances tauntingly. \n \tMy journey in mathematical modelling of blood vessels in cancer has taken me through many strange avenues. Tracking the movement of cancer required the calculation of cellular surface area. My initial software was unbearably slow, a seemingly simple case of inefficient code. Further testing revealed that the algorithm was flawed, and required a complete redesign. Unfazed, I labored on, researching and testing different algorithms, and reading contemporary research articles. Yet, two weeks have passed, but the negative results still pile up and my drive begins to dwindle.\n\nInspiration strikes on a play-date with my 6 year old cousin. Trying to count her Legos, instead she accidentally counts the sides. Immediately, I theorize that calculating the surface area like counting sides of Legos would speed up the algorithm. A hectic coding session finalizes and confirms the result. \"Completion Time: 1.2 minutes\". Away from the technology that drives my research, reflections and inspirations help me overcome the challenges. Research continues to throw curveballs at me, but I don't give up. When the challenge seems insurmountable, I remember the reason I research: beyond the obstacle lies a goal worth fighting for.\n\n"},{"_id":"4b323c9d2fc382fb3000005a","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":922182,"position":0.5,"parentId":"48daad7cfcff8c224d000037","content":"##RD 3\n\"Completion time: 1000 minutes\" I pore through the code over and over, the algorithm burned into my brain by now. For weeks, I study research articles and experiment with alternative algorithms, but I make no headway. Just outside my grasp, the optimal algorithm dances tauntingly. \n \tMy journey in mathematically modelling the spread of blood vessels in cancer has taken me through many strange avenues. While tracking the movement of cancerous cells, I needed to calculate the surface area of cells. My initial software was unbearably slow, a seemingly simple case of inefficient code. Further testing revealed that the algorithm was flawed, and required a complete redesign. Unfazed, I labored, researching and testing different algorithms, and reading contemporary research articles. Yet, the negative results still pile up, and my drive begins to dwindle, the project almost abandoned as a lost hope.\nInspiration strikes on a playdate with my 6 year old cousin. Trying to count her Legos, she instead accidentally counts the sides. Immediately, I theorize that calculating the surface area like counting sides of Legos would speed up the algorithm. A hectic coding session finalizes and confirms the result. \"Completion Time: 1.2 minutes\". Away from the technology that drives my research, simple inspirations help me overcome the challenges. Research continues to throw curveballs at me, but I persevere. When the challenge seems insurmountable, I remember the reason I research: beyond the obstacle lies a goal worth fighting for.\n"},{"_id":"4b31def62fc382fb30000059","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":913312,"position":1,"parentId":"48daad7cfcff8c224d000037","content":"##RD 2\n\"Completion time: 1000 minutes\" Poring through the code over and over, my algorithms are burned into my brain by now. My laptop is full of code for alternative algorithms that prove no avail. Research journals are scattered across my desk, none with the proper solution . Weeks of searching make no headway, yet the optimal algorithm dances tantalizingly close to my fingertips. \n\n My journey in mathematically modelling the spread of blood vessels in cancer has taken me to many strange avenues. While tracking the movement of the cancerous cells, I needed to speedily calculate the surface area of cells. My initial algorithm was unbearably slow, a seemingly simple case of inefficient code. Further testing revealed that the algorithm was flawed, and required a complete redesign. Unfazed, I labored, researching and testing different algorithms, rewriting code, and reading contemporary research articles, yet the negative results still pile up. With no positive My drive begins to dwindle, and the project is abandoned, a lost hope, left for the mites in my room .\n\nInspiration struck on a play date with my 6 year old cousin. Trying to count her Legos, she instead was accidentally counting the sides. Immediately, I theorize that calculating the surface area like counting sides of Legos would speed up the algorithm. Digging back into my project , a hectic coding session finalizes and confirms the result. \"Completion Time: 1.2 minutes\". The obstacle nearly sent my project into a death spiral, but I overcame the roadblock and proceeded to further discoveries. Research will continue throwing curveballs at me, and even when the challenge seems impossible, I remember the reason I research: beyond the obstacle lies a goal worth fighting for."},{"_id":"48da9449fcff8c224d000035","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":913314,"position":2,"parentId":"48daad7cfcff8c224d000037","content":"##RD 1\n\"Completion time: 1000 minutes\" The code must be burned into my brain by now. I've experimented and researched for weeks, but the optimal algorithm still eludes me. I keep searching , yet wonder if this impossible problem would capsize my project.\n\n Over the last two years, I have mathematically modelled the spread of blood vessels in cancer. An important aspect in my research was tracking surface area of cells, but my algorithm to evaluate surface area was unbearably slow. The problem seemed to be inefficient code, but actually, the algorithm itself was flawed, and redesign was needed to fix the issue. I labored, reading scientific journals to find solutions and testing different algorithms, all to no avail. As negative results pile up, my drive flags, and I almost quit on my research. It took Legos and a kid's mindset to defeat the surface area algorithm.\n\nOne day, I noticed my cousin trying to count his Legos, but instead accidentally counting the sides. Inspiration struck. Calculating the surface area like counting the sides of Legos would greatly speed up the algorithm and coding confirmed the result. Finally, my surface area algorithm was successful. \n\n\"Completion Time: 1.2 minutes\". Although the surface area obstacle nearly downed me, the process developed my knowledge , and propelled me to further research. Research will continue to throw impossible problems at me, but I will struggle on. I will not cease, for I know that past the obstacle lies a goal worth laboring for."},{"_id":"4a3ec388f0bc5695b500003c","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1186093,"position":8,"parentId":"46a7776f98be5bc1ea000045","content":"#Intel STS\n\n*11/12/14 -- Done*"},{"_id":"4baee04b63c7b3b50b000095","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":980429,"position":0.5,"parentId":"4a3ec388f0bc5695b500003c","content":" Who supervised the research? Provide names, titles, and affiliations for key people who supported the research. If you have personal ties to any of them (e.g. parent, relative, family friend), please indicate the nature of the relationship.\n*500 chars*"},{"_id":"4bbbfc9d63c7b3b50b0000a2","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":2111347,"position":1,"parentId":"4baee04b63c7b3b50b000095","content":"My research was primarily independent and self-driven, but it had two major influences. Firstly, my father, Prasanta Ghosh, advised my project and guided me through the research process. I also received outside help from Dr. Kamalika Chaudhuri (Assistant Professor at UC San Diego) .A mutual family friend, she helped me develop my PDE solver and critiqued my research paper. She played a minor role in my research."},{"_id":"4baee26863c7b3b50b000096","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":980791,"position":0.75,"parentId":"4a3ec388f0bc5695b500003c","content":"How did you get the idea for the research? Explain the development of your research design\n*500 chars*"},{"_id":"4bbc724463c7b3b50b0000a3","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":2111355,"position":1,"parentId":"4baee26863c7b3b50b000096","content":"Inspired to model cancer angiogenesis, I read through research articles to glean knowledge of the topic and find a research question. I narrowed down my pursuit to a few subtopics, which I intensively studied. I was drawn to a combinatory model, which integrates various aspects of angiogenesis into a single model. Piqued by the challenge of integrating multiple models, the allure of increased accuracy and the many practical applications of combinatory models, I chose to pursue this field."},{"_id":"4baee3b363c7b3b50b000097","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":980431,"position":0.875,"parentId":"4a3ec388f0bc5695b500003c","content":"What was the duration of the research? Explain the amount of time you spent on the research project that you have submitted.\n*350 chars*"},{"_id":"4bbbe52063c7b3b50b0000a1","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":997771,"position":1,"parentId":"4baee3b363c7b3b50b000097","content":"The current thread of research began in May of 2014. I've conducted this research (parttime during school and fulltime during summer) ever since. My research continues to this day, but the project is based on my findings as of October 2014. \nMay - June 2014 -- 3 hours/week\nJune - August 2014 -- 40 hours/week\nAugust 2014- Present -- 6 hours/week\n"},{"_id":"4baee56e63c7b3b50b000098","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":974979,"position":0.9375,"parentId":"4a3ec388f0bc5695b500003c","content":"##What did I do?\n"},{"_id":"4baee5b163c7b3b50b000099","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":974980,"position":1,"parentId":"4baee56e63c7b3b50b000098","content":"Developing/Initiating the purpose of the research \n*400 chars*"},{"_id":"4bc208a2f77b4e819d0000a3","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":997772,"position":1,"parentId":"4baee5b163c7b3b50b000099","content":"I began this research as an extension of my previous work in breast cancer modelling. While competing at the California State Science Fair, a judge helped me make the connection between my work and cancer angiogenesis, as a logical step to continue my research. I studied and found interest in the topic, and I independently developed a research question in the field to pursue."},{"_id":"4baee6a463c7b3b50b00009a","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":974982,"position":2,"parentId":"4baee56e63c7b3b50b000098","content":"Designing the procedures:\n*400 chars*\n"},{"_id":"4bc208c2f77b4e819d0000a4","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":997773,"position":1,"parentId":"4baee6a463c7b3b50b00009a","content":"The main procedure in my research was developing a successful mathematical model of the system at hand. Learning from mathematical courses in computational biology, I developed my own model and derived a discretized version of the model, all on my own accord. Although many of my models are common and derivative, I didn't receive help from any single source that is noteworthy."},{"_id":"4baee74f63c7b3b50b00009b","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":974983,"position":3,"parentId":"4baee56e63c7b3b50b000098","content":" Implementing the procedure (including special techniques or the use of special equipment)\n*400 chars*"},{"_id":"4bc2100af77b4e819d0000a5","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":997774,"position":1,"parentId":"4baee74f63c7b3b50b00009b","content":"In order to test my mathematical model, I needed to develop an environment that could simulate the partial differential equations. I wrote an program in C++ to code this, with all algorithms developed by myself or derived from open-source alternatives. For my Partial Differential Equation solver in my simulation, I got help from Dr. Chaudhuri in the theory, although I implemented it myself."},{"_id":"4baee7cd63c7b3b50b00009c","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":974985,"position":4,"parentId":"4baee56e63c7b3b50b000098","content":"Gathering / Recording Data\n*400 chars*"},{"_id":"4bc21068f77b4e819d0000a6","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":997775,"position":1,"parentId":"4baee7cd63c7b3b50b00009c","content":"I set up all the experiments on the computer and conducted them all by myself.I developed a data extraction algorithm that hooked into my simulation to collect extensive data while the simulation ran. Using Microsoft Excel and various Python plotting libraries, I created visual representations of this data for future and data analysis."},{"_id":"4baee85663c7b3b50b00009d","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":974986,"position":5,"parentId":"4baee56e63c7b3b50b000098","content":"Analyzing Data/Performing Calculations:\n*400 chars*"},{"_id":"4bc210bcf77b4e819d0000a7","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":997776,"position":1,"parentId":"4baee85663c7b3b50b00009d","content":"To analyze data, I used two main methods of comparison. Firstly, I compared the data gathered from different runs together to analyze the effect of condition shifting (sensitivity analysis) on the model, gathering the influence of each input in the system. Secondly, I manipulated the variables to match physical experimental data to develop a practical framework model. "},{"_id":"4baee91d63c7b3b50b00009e","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":974988,"position":6,"parentId":"4baee56e63c7b3b50b000098","content":" Formulating Conclusions:\n\n*400 chars*"},{"_id":"4bc21111f77b4e819d0000a8","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":997862,"position":1,"parentId":"4baee91d63c7b3b50b00009e","content":"I came to my conclusions primarily by myself. I compared my results with those of other experimenters to confirm the validity of my model. With the help of my father, I explored possible further research ventures and potential real-world applications of my discoveries. He helped me develop my reverse parallax algorithm, but I made my theoretical conclusions by myself."},{"_id":"4bcf77711a6233544f0000ac","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":991136,"position":0.953125,"parentId":"4a3ec388f0bc5695b500003c","content":"What are your future aspirations in field of study and occupation? What would you like to be doing ten years from now?"},{"_id":"4bcf778c1a6233544f0000ad","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":997750,"position":1,"parentId":"4bcf77711a6233544f0000ac","content":"Parlez vous mathématiques? Mathematics is my language, a set of numbers and equations I order to describe the world around me. In college, I will gain fluency in the language of applied mathematics. Using this knowledge, I will tackle the world's most complex problems through applied mathematics."},{"_id":"4baef05c63c7b3b50b00009f","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":975000,"position":0.96875,"parentId":"4a3ec388f0bc5695b500003c","content":"##Extracurriculars\nPlease list the top 5 extracurricular activities in which you have been involved during your high school career and offer a brief explanation of your involvement including the duration and/or any leadership role (e.g. athletics, Boy Scouts or Girl Scouts, school publications, music, clubs and student government).*"},{"_id":"4baef7c563c7b3b50b0000a0","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":975001,"position":0.984375,"parentId":"4a3ec388f0bc5695b500003c","content":"##Honors\n\nAcademic, Extracurricular, Community"},{"_id":"4a3ec405f0bc5695b500003d","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":974955,"position":1,"parentId":"4a3ec388f0bc5695b500003c","content":"##Layman Summary\n\nSummarize your project in layperson's terms, while maintaining scientific accuracy. Your explanation should be easily understandable and include background, procedures, conclusions and relevance. The summary will aid readers, including evaluators, journalists and the public.\n\n*750 chars*"},{"_id":"4bdbeb84e868e1bc5f0000ae","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":997755,"position":0.5,"parentId":"4a3ec405f0bc5695b500003d","content":"##Cut Down\nAngiogenesis, the creation of blood vessels to let oxygen reach cells, plays a critical role in cancer proliferations. In this research, we extend previously developed theoretical models to a practical patient-based solution. Our model has two focuses: a) the movement of chemicals in the system, b) the interactions amongst cells. We find the 3 main factors required for angiogenesis to complete: the density of cancerous cells, the density of the extracellular matrix, and the distance between the tumor and blood vessels. Overall, this research develops a framework for analysis of angiogenesis in patients, With future medical technology, this will allow for diagnosis of the criticality of tumors through body scans."},{"_id":"4baec32763c7b3b50b000092","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":997754,"position":1,"parentId":"4a3ec405f0bc5695b500003d","content":"Angiogenesis, the creation of new blood vessels from the cardiovascular system to let oxygen and nutrients reach new cells, plays a critical role in cancer proliferation and metastasis. In this research, we extend the theoretical models to a more practical patient-based solution. Our model has two main focuses: a) the movement of chemicals between the tumor and blood vessels, b) the interactions between cells in the environment. Through testing, we find the 3 main factors in the success for cancer to complete angiogenesis: the density of cancerous cells, the density of the extracellular matrix, and the distance between the tumor and blood vessels. Overall, this research develops a practical framework for analysis of angiogenesis in individual patients. Although the necessary medical imaging technology is still in development, this model will allows people to understand the criticality of their tumor from medical scans, based on the likelihood of angiogenesis to complete."},{"_id":"4a3ec51df0bc5695b500003e","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":991112,"position":2,"parentId":"4a3ec388f0bc5695b500003c","content":"##Inspiration\n\nWhat inspired you to conduct this research project?\n\n*1000 chars*"},{"_id":"4bcf9c501a6233544f0000af","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":2111385,"position":1,"parentId":"4a3ec51df0bc5695b500003e","content":"My aunt was falsely diagnosed with cancer in late 2012, and underwent many surgeries and treatments, leaving her debilitated. My eyes were opened to the many faults in the fields of cancer diagnosis and treatment, and I was driven to learn more. I initially pursued cancer diagnosis, with my breast cancer detection research, yet found that my interests didn't lie there. Studying how cancer proliferated, I discovered the field of cancer angiogenesis, the relationship between tumors and blood vessels. I was piqued by the interactions between noncancerous vascular tissue, yet also disappointed by the lack of practical extensions of angiogenesis models. Within my disappointment, I found opportunity. Enthralled by the chance to have a practical effect in the world, I set off to study and develop real-life connections of cancer-induced angiogenesis. "},{"_id":"4a3ec5dcf0bc5695b500003f","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":974947,"position":3,"parentId":"4a3ec388f0bc5695b500003c","content":"##Interest in Science\nHow has doing this research project helped you clarify your interest in science?\n\n*1000 chars*"},{"_id":"4bdbefdbe868e1bc5f0000af","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":997758,"position":0.5,"parentId":"4a3ec5dcf0bc5695b500003f","content":"##Cut Down\n\nThis research has furthered my interest in applied mathematics. I started my project with two main topics in mind: applied mathematics and computer science. As I conducted my research, I realized that my aspirations rested in applied mathematics, and that my computer acumen was only a tool for achieving it. I am entranced by the world of research, and to this day, I continue pursuing my interest in mathematics through my study of angiogenesis.\n\nFurthermore, mathematical modelling of cancer angiogenesis has revealed many insights about the research process. Unaccustomed to pursuing mathematics at such a deep level, where many concepts remain undiscovered, I encountered many problems. Realizing that I couldn't overcome these obstacles without complete focus, I learned to handle procrastination and my distractions. "},{"_id":"4baeac2b63c7b3b50b000091","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":997757,"position":1,"parentId":"4a3ec5dcf0bc5695b500003f","content":"Mathematical modelling of cancer angiogenesis has revealed many insights about the research process. Unaccustomed to pursuing mathematics at such a deep level, where many concepts remain undiscovered, I encountered many problems. Realizing that I couldn't overcome these obstacles without complete focus, I learned to handle procrastination and my distractions. \n\nEspecially in applied mathematics, physical data is necessary to prove my modelling predictions. Sometimes, without data, my models are incorrect, cautioning me to be weary of my results. Despite the occasional false result, the thrill I experienced after correctly linking my model predictions with experimental data was unparalleled and drove me to research further. \n\nThis research has furthered my interest in applied mathematics. I started my project with two main topics in mind: applied mathematics and computer science. As I conducted my research, I realized that my aspirations rested in applied mathematics, and that my computer acumen was only a tool for achieving it. I am entranced by the world of research, and to this day, I continue pursuing my interest in mathematics through my study of angiogenesis."},{"_id":"4a3ec67ff0bc5695b5000040","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":986091,"position":4,"parentId":"4a3ec388f0bc5695b500003c","content":"##Benefits of Research \nWhat benefits do you think your research will bring to the world? What additional steps, and by whom, might be needed for this benefit to be realized?\n\n*1000 chars*\n"},{"_id":"4bc9002bf77b4e819d0000a9","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":997761,"position":2,"parentId":"4a3ec67ff0bc5695b5000040","content":"Hundreds of thousands of cancer-stricken people undergo the wrong treatment due to miscalculations of the severeness of the cancer, leading to unnecessary surgeries to malignant tumors missing treatment. This research diagnoses the criticality of a tumor by determining the likelihood of angiogenesis to complete, a factor in metastasis and proliferation. By understanding how the patient's cancer angiogenesizes and proliferates, this technology will provide the appropriate level of treatment and maximize chances of being cured.\nDespite this theoretical background, there remain many technologies that need to be developed for the full functioning of this model. The model developed in this paper is dependent upon many individual inputs that are specific to the tumor and requires new nonintrusive tests to find these levels. Furthermore, for the cancer criticality detector to be effective, technology to create 3d models of the cardiovascular system surrounding the tumor will be necessary. \n"},{"_id":"4a3ec7d5f0bc5695b5000042","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":990992,"position":5,"parentId":"4a3ec388f0bc5695b500003c","content":"##Your Potential as a Scientist, Mathematician, or Engineer\nAddress through specific and concrete examples what characteristics you have that best demonstrate your affinity and aptitude for being a good scientist. What have you done that illustrates scientific attitude, curiosity, inventiveness, initiative? How does your experience suggest future success as a scientist, mathematician or engineer?\n*3000 chars*"},{"_id":"4bcf14cc1a6233544f0000aa","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":997762,"position":2,"parentId":"4a3ec7d5f0bc5695b5000042","content":"I've hit a wall. Scanning research articles and my code for weeks hasn't made any headway, yet the algorithm seems tantalizingly close. I reflect upon the transformation of my simple mammogram processing research into automated breast cancer detection. Yet, one key aspect of my research, detecting irregularities, still eludes me. The solution strikes 4,000 ft up a mountain, miles away from the technology that propels my research.\nKneeling down by a creek to quench my thirst, a sight catches my eye. In my peripherals, rainfall trickles through the dirt and accumulates on the surface. Racing with ideas, I theorize that simulated rainfall on a system would accumulate near the cancerous abnormalities. Small observations like these trigger my best inspirations. Even when away from my research, I am attentive, forever looking for connections. My scientific curiousity never leaves me, and whenever I encounter a new experience, I tackle it with the same passion that drives my research.\n With only pen and notepad, I flesh out the rainfall idea into a practical abnormality detector. Studying from my EdX and Coursera data analysis courses, I develop a database of information on the topic. Whether from research journals, Wikipedia articles, or my Science Bowl ventures, I am constantly on the pursuit of knowledge. Utilizing a design review I learned from robotics, I repetitively optimize the code, and explore alternative algorithms to enhance my design. When I optimize my algorithms, I am persistent, never yielding to below perfection, an attitude of perseverance that permeates everything I do. \nHunched over a laptop, furiously typing code for hours, my rainfall algorithm comes to life. Fetching a few abnormal cancerous images, my detection algorithm boots up, and the test begins. \"30% complete.\" Anxiety claws at me. \"60%\" . Nervousness racks my body, and the progress counter seems to slow down. \"100%\". Finally, the program exits, and I analyze the data. With a keen eye, I examine the results to find abnormalities, and one line pops out as an abnormality. \"Cancer status: positive; Type: Abnormal Lesion.\" My attention to detail has has been crucial to advancing my research, and is the paradigm that I view my world with.\n At heart, I am a scientist,society's problems driving my research. Research is a never-ending cycle of new obstacles, but with my perseverance and intellectual curiousity, I learn and discover. My passion for science bleeds through my resolve and scientific attitude, and as a future scientist, I will fight on to understand and conquer the world's most challenging problems."},{"_id":"4baed63e63c7b3b50b000093","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":991109,"position":3,"parentId":"4a3ec7d5f0bc5695b5000042","content":"## Mod this for the Prompt\n've hit a wall. Scanning research articles and my code for weeks hasn't made any headway, yet the algorithm seems tantalizingly close. I reflect upon the transformation of my simple mammogram processing research into automated breast cancer detection. Yet, one key aspect of my research, detecting irregularities, still eludes me. The solution strikes 4,000 ft up a mountain, miles away from the technology that propels my research.\n\nKneeling down by a creek to quench my thirst, a sight catches my eye. In my peripherals, rainfall trickles through the dirt and accumulates on the surface. Racing with ideas, I theorize that simulated rainfall on a system would accumulate near the cancerous abnormalities. Small observations like these trigger my best inspirations. At Caltech, I will work with my fellow students to find simple solutions for the complex problems I encounter in class and research.\n\nWith only pen and notepad, I flesh out the rainfall idea into a practical abnormality detector. Borrowing algorithms from my EdX and Coursera data analysis courses, I create a prototype of the rainfall algorithm, which is slow and inefficient. Utilizing a design review I learned from robotics, I repetitively optimize the code, and explore alternative algorithms to enhance my design. At Caltech, professors of applied mathematics and other scientific disciplines will teach me new statistical analysis techniques to further enhance the ideas that I derive.\n\nHunched over a laptop, furiously typing code for hours, my research comes to life. I design simulations and experiments to test whether the problem is fixed. Fetching a few abnormal cancerous images, my detection algorithm boots up, and the test begins. \"30% complete.\" Anxiety claws at me. \"60%\" . Nervousness racks my body, and the progress counter seems to slow down. \"100%\". Finally, the program exits, and I quickly scan the results. One line pops out \"Cancer status: positive; Type: Abnormal Lesion.\" I leap up out of my chair in excitement and celebrate the success of my algorithm.The significance of my success hits me.I am no longer reading the book of science. I am writing it.\n\nResearch drives me to discover and pursue society's problems. My enthusiasm for research will bleed into my peers at Caltech, and together we will discuss problem sets and our endeavors outside of classes. I will frequent the Annenburg Center to glean knowledge from my esteemed professors. As I brainstorm answers to my research questions sitting next to the turtle pond, perhaps the sight of a turtle poking its head above a lily will inspire a solution. Caltech's academic rigor and supportive family will best prepare me for my future in graduate school and research beyond. In ten years, with my knowledge in mathematics from Caltech, I hope to be tackling the world's problems and making a difference.\n"},{"_id":"4a3ec8d0f0bc5695b5000043","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":990988,"position":6,"parentId":"4a3ec388f0bc5695b500003c","content":"## Major Scientific Question\nWhat is a major scientific question in your field whose answer you believe will have a significant impact on the world in the next 20 years, and why? Using examples from your own experience or research, explain how you might envision addressing the question over the next 20 years. \n*3000 chars*"},{"_id":"4bdd330de868e1bc5f0000b0","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1017777,"position":0.5,"parentId":"4a3ec8d0f0bc5695b5000043","content":"\"Doctor, will I live?\" \"How far will my tumor spread?\" \"How much longer do I have to live?\" These questions echo throughout medical clinics, only to be met with resounding silence or meek apologies. The expansive field of cancer proliferation attempts to answer and explain such questions in the most accurate way possible. To this day, many discoveries have been made in predicting the growth pattern of tumors. In the future, our understanding of how cancers grow will be significantly greater, enough to track and locate the future location of cancerous lesions. By understanding the process that drives the spread of cancer, we can preemptively strike where the cancer will go next, leading to more effective treatments. Furthermore, if we are able to develop inversible mathematical models that properly detail cancer proliferation, then we can determine the optimal circumstances in which cancers occur to prevent cancer from starting in the first place. \nI chose cancer-induced angiogenesis as my field of research because of its high potential to make a difference in our understanding of cancer proliferation. As a currently new field, there aren't many discoveries, but future research will clearly change. My research shifted focus from the typical mathematical models of angiogenesis to its effects on cancer proliferation. My innovative criticality algorithm for tumors gave rudimentary predictions on the chances of tumor metastasis. Unfortunately, analysis has shown that the randomness of the environment can often overwhelm these factors. Future research in this field will not only reduce the impact of the randomness on the predictions by finding new factors and algorithms. Not only will we have more accurate diagnostic software thanks to angiogenesis, it will also be aided by medical technology which hopefully will be able to create 3d models of the cellular environment, and visually depict the progression of the cancer through the environment. \nAngiogenesis is clearly one of the newest subfields for cancer proliferation. Despite the lack of previous discoveries, I can predict with great certainty that our understanding of angiogenesis will have a tremendous impact upon society as a whole. 20 years from now, the main focus of angiogenesis will clearly be upon its impact on cancer proliferation. Furthermore, the angiogenesis research will also study protein modelling, to find ways to inhibit angiogenesis. Whether the focus be diagnosing tumors, detecting where they will migrate to, or methods of inhibition, research on modelling angiogenesis will play a tremendous role in our understanding of cancer proliferation far into the future, and positively benefit society in the process.\n\n\n\n\n"},{"_id":"4bd1040b090458d0120000ad","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":997975,"position":1,"parentId":"4a3ec8d0f0bc5695b5000043","content":"##Very Very Rudimentary Draft \n \"Doctor, will I live?\" \"So, how far will my tumor spread?\" \"How much longer do I have to live?\" These questions echo throughout medical clinics, only to be met with resounding silence or meek apologies. The expansive field of cancer proliferation attempts to answer and explain such questions in the most accurate way possible. To this day, there have been many discoveries in predicting the growth pattern of tumors. In the future, our understanding of how cancers grow will be significantly larger, and such advances can lead to more effective treatments and possibly .....\n\n\n\nMy research has given me hints as to predicting the future movement of tumors. When I computed various simulations with differing variables, I was able to determine the ffects of variables like cell density and distance for angiogenesis ot occur. By determining what the time required for angiogenesis to complete coupled with the average nonhypoxic cancer spread rate, I was able to rudimentarily answer these questions.\n\n\n\nAngiogenesis is one of the new fields for understanding cancer proliferation. As such, there aren't many current discoveries. My research finding the criticality of tumors is one of many ways that the field of cancer-induced angiogenesis can revolutionize our understanding of cancer proliferation. Future research in this field might be able to determine the chances of cancers to proliferate ... "},{"_id":"4b9b3685373a32e8d0000087","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1186096,"position":8.5,"parentId":"46a7776f98be5bc1ea000045","content":"#UC System\n\n*11/30/14 -- Done*"},{"_id":"4b9b3743373a32e8d0000088","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1150055,"position":1,"parentId":"4b9b3685373a32e8d0000087","content":"Describe the world you come from — for example, your family, community or school — and tell us how your world has shaped your dreams and aspirations.\n"},{"_id":"4cbe4fade1c089ccd80000b6","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1368666,"position":0.125,"parentId":"4b9b3743373a32e8d0000088","content":"I am an ABCD: American Born Confused Desi. Living in America and growing up in an Indian household, my upbringing was enveloped in conflict between these diametrically opposite backgrounds. With different traditions, different norms, and different cultures, I was stalemated between my Indian and American backgrounds, a conflict that ignited my drive to study computer science and pursue scientific research. This newfound passion for science ultimately inspired me to resolve the long-standing conflict between my disparate backgrounds, an amalgamation that now drives me to pursue my passions.\n\nMy house is a miniature India. Bengali songs and poetry echo through my house, accompanied by the soothing harmonium. Behind this vibrant culture and savory cuisine lies India’s mandated familial respect and strict societal values. My conservative parents curtailed my freedom and often didn’t allow me to leave the house. Retaliating against these traditional restrictions, I found freedom in coding, where only my imagination limited what I could develop. Over the years, I've created a plethora of programs including custom operating systems, alternative Snapchat applications,and high frequency stock trading simulators. \n\nUnlike the rigid structure at home, I experience the diversity and freedom of America at school. Used to a simple Bengali culture, I am astounded by the diverse melting pot of American traditions, yet perplexed by the lack of devotion to these customs. Furthermore, whereas my Bengali background was too restrictive, America was too flexible. In my extracurricular pursuits in Robotics and Science Bowl, I was given full freedom to operate, but without a guiding hand I was often lost. I learned to harness my creativity through science fairs. Through this scientific research, I am able to explore the world around me in a structured method. Ever since seventh grade, I have investigated concepts like desalination and solar panels to satiate my curiosity.\n\nConflicted between worlds of concentrated traditions and diverse customs, between values of structure and function, I was in the crossfire between America and India. Self-reflecting on my newfound passions, I synthesized these mismatching cultural worlds. Through my programming pursuits and scientific research, I gained freedom from my oppressing Bengali traditions and harnessed the freedom of America through structure. I realized that I wasn't only Indian or only American, but rather a combination of these worlds. I took the middle ground, compromising between Indian discipline and America’s opportunity. Fusing my vibrant Indian traditions and the diverse mixing pot of American culture, I finally eliminated the confusion that ruled my life. \n\nI am no longer an American Born Confused Desi. I now understand the roles India and America play in my life, and how irrevocably these worlds are intertwined in my heart. Through the conflict, I unearthed my passion in computer science and research. My newly unified cultural background now inspires me to pursue these passions. My Indian heritage drives me to structurally pursue my goals. America inspires me to develop unique solutions. Without either world, I am incomplete. Together, they give me the imagination and drive to tackle the world's most complex problems through scientific research."},{"_id":"4c96584aada2df2f2b0000b4","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1130991,"position":0.25,"parentId":"4b9b3743373a32e8d0000088","content":"##RD 2\n\nYou can tell much about a person’s character by the programming language they use. Living in the Silicon Valley, I picked up my region’s favorite pastime, programming at age 7, writing “Hello World” programs and developing little applets. Over my 10 years coding, I've developed the unique habit of coding in a seamless mixture of C++ and Python. Two programming languages from different eras, with different styles, and for different audiences, Python and C++ represent my polarly opposite cultural backgrounds. Raised as a Bengali, yet living in America, I walk the line between, incorporating the best of both worlds. As the combination of programming languages gives me the tools to pursue my dreams, the synthesis of my worlds gives me the drive to achieve them.\n\nMy home is a hodgepodge of West Bengal. My parents migrated to this country with just the clothes on their backs, knowing only their native language, Bengali. [Possible Omission and Integration ->] As a result, I was born and raised in this Bengali environment.Many evenings were spend singing Bengali songs and banging on the keys of our harmonium (piano). Yet behind the festivals and the merrymaking, was a wall of stone. My parents exacted absolute discipline, and it seemed that the only English word they knew was \"study\". Everything had structure, and the freedom I experienced at school and outside was silenced once I came home. I did only the activities they felt right, and I couldn't go out anywhere unless they approved it (which they never did). Surrounded by these I felt hampered, seemingly unable to pursue my interests or explore beyond. However, through this controlled lifestyle, I enjoyed great academic success, narrowminded as may be, and soon I learned to accept my parent's disciplined methods of raising me.\nHere in this closed environment, I learned the ancient programming language C++. As I delved into the nuances of this programming language, I was thrilled yet deterred. It was a language based on structure, with guidelines that you could not deviate from. Even forgetting a semicolon could cause your program to crash. It reminded me much of the strict environment that surrounded me in my home, the unforgiving nature. Yet at the same time, I was empowered by the elegance of coding, and its power to create. Thus, much like my family situation, I learned to live with the structure and discipline, in peaceful coexistence. \nAs I matured, I strove to pursue my interests by insistently nagging my parents. My pursuits to liberalize my life were twice renewed when I discovered Python in 9th grade. With its English-like syntax and ability to create whatever I wanted, I was finally freed. Python idealized the American Dream for me, a language with the power to discover whatever we want. In the phase of liberalizing, I abandoned C++ as my default language for Python. As I strove to expand my interests and pursuits, I enveloped myself in the world of extracurriculars and began to lose touch with the Bengali heritage of structure and function.\nIt took one of my hardest challenges to align with the duality that controls me today. I was struggling with a science fair project on file compression that had enveloped all of my time. When I coded the project with Python, it was unbearably slow and couldn't give all of the functionality I needed. I tried coding the project in C++, yet in some cases, the complexity was unbearably high. [ Rephrase]. I was stuck between the two for countless. I solved my problem by answering one question: \"So are you American or Indian?\" And just like that, the duality broke. I realized that I was neither American nor Indian, I was both. I returned to my project with a renewed vigor, and combined the two programming languages to success. From that moment on, I realized that just how my programming requires a blend of both languages, my character lies with both my heritages: West Bengal and America. \n It took a clash of programming languages for me to truly understand my background and heritage. In many ways, Python and C++ are synonymous with my Americanized and Indian heritages. Just how Python and C++ are now intertwined in my code,West Bengal and America have intertwined themselves in my heart. I inhabit the little overlap region between the two worlds. Together, these union of these worlds drive me to pursue my aspirations in computer science further. My Indian heritage provides structure: it reminds me of my family's humble roots and that I must take small, simple, yet concretely defined steps to achieve my goals. Python reminds me to utilize my imagination, to dream high, and to license creative freedom when developing solutions. Without either, I am incomplete. Together, these worlds drive me to journey onward to tackle the world's most complicated problems.\n\n"},{"_id":"4c9403b4ada2df2f2b0000b3","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1130842,"position":0.5,"parentId":"4b9b3743373a32e8d0000088","content":"##RD 1\n\nThey say you can tell a lot about a person by the programming language they use. Unlike many of the programmers in this Silicon Valley, I owe my allegiance to no particular language, and [Talk About Hybrid between Python and C++] Raised as a Bengali, yet living in America, I walk the line between. The world that I see and the dreams that I pursue have \nMy father came to this country with just the clothes on his back and the laptop in his bag. The only languages he knew were Bengali and PASCAL. A radical shift from his simple roots, he struggled to adjust to this newfound way of living. I was born almost immediately It doesn't come much of a surprise that I am born and raised Bengali. Bengali was my first language, and ever since I could enunciate, I've been singing Rabindanath Tagore and Nazrul Islam songs and banging on the keys of our harmonium (piano). I went to festivals and pujas all dressed up in panjabis and kurtas, eating Indian sweets and performing in poetry recitals. \nOnce I knew how to speak English and Bengali, I learned a third language: C++. C++, the programming language of the olden times, was a mystique to me: an arcane language filled with secret functions and . C++ is known for its emphasis on structure, and 7 year old me didn't like it. But now, I have come to respect the humble roots that my family comes from. It helps me stay grounded in my roots and make me realize the small and steady steps that I must take to achieve my goals. \nJust outside my Bengali-infested house beckoned the freedom of America. Away from the stringent rules of my parents . It was in 7th grade when I discovered the wonder of Python in my . To me, Python idealized the American Dream. A language with the power to discover whatever we want. [Insert More About Python]. Yet, I soon realized that Python was only good for visualizing .... [Talk about how I learned to hybridize them]\n Python and C++ have intertwined themselves into my brain much like West Bengal and America are intertwined in my heart. I inhabit the little overlap region between the two worlds. Some say that being trapped between the two makes me miss the best of both worlds. \"You've never eaten at In and Out?\" \"You've never celebrated Holi\". But in reality, I enjoy the best of both worlds. Without one I am incomplete. Together, these worlds drive me onward to tackle the world's most complicated problems.\n\n"},{"_id":"4c3fa02016336b5ef50000b1","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1151178,"position":1,"parentId":"4b9b3743373a32e8d0000088","content":"\nGears. Check. Metal Plates. Check. My hands fly across the table, zooming from screws to axles to gears. From amidst the chaos, a machine rises. My fingers zooming over the keyboard, I code frantically on my computer, and with a simple \"Compile\" command, I breath life into my robot. The green lights stares up at me, and the robot responds to the minute movements of my joystick. I breath an audible sigh of relief, and look up to see the busy commotion in the room. Hidden in the corner of the school, in an expansive yet reclusive Every time I walk into CT-2, I am filled with a feeling of curiosity and innovation that continually drives. Hardware litters the corridor, and the familiar buzz of the bandsaw hums in my ears. I am thrown back to 9th grade, as a tiny freshman, standing among huge machines and robots that seemed larger than life. Surrounded by giants and seniors who looked too old to be in college, let alone high school, I felt out of place. <Insert Details> To this day, that first robot that we built smiles back at me from the corner of the room.\n\nIn the back of the room hangs a whiteboard stained with the diagrams and drawings of robots past. After the seniors left my freshman year, the small yet intense club that I had immersed myself into vanished. Unaccustomed to helping run a club, I pooled together my friends to rebuild. At first, the whiteboard was covered with recruiting strategies and club promotion techniques. Our hard work began to pay off, and as people began trickling in, \n\nCT-2 is filled with huge arcane machines with unimaginably high prices, yet the most precious thing in the room fits in a backpack. An collection of 100 tightly bound pages, my engineering notebook reflects the ideas and thoughts that have driven my robotics projects. Coming to class \n\nIn the very center of the room, lies a 12 foot by 12 foot field that is my battleground. Competing in the VEX Robotics Tournament for the last 3 years, I've helped our team reach \n\nAs I've come to expect every night,, the lights in the building turn off at 5. CT-2 is where the abstract becomes reality. Surrounded by ....., my crazy ideas come to ife. The fellow inhabitans who mill about CT-2 have become my family. Even as I walk out of the building, my second home, the "},{"_id":"4b9b3760373a32e8d0000089","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1150172,"position":2,"parentId":"4b9b3685373a32e8d0000087","content":"Tell us about a personal quality, talent, accomplishment, contribution or experience that is important to you. What about this quality or accomplishment makes you proud, and how does it relate to the person you are?\n"},{"_id":"4cbe5c41e1c089ccd80000b7","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1519844,"position":0.25,"parentId":"4b9b3760373a32e8d0000089","content":"##Final Draft\nI never thought I would be fighting cancer. Yet my pursuit of understanding breast cancer detection hurled me onto the front line of research against the malignant disease. Obtaining data and guidance from professionals, I developed a unique automated breast cancer detection algorithm. This independent venture delved further into the scientific unknown than my previous science fair projects and immersed me into the world of scientific research. From its inception to final presentation at the California State Science Fair, this project was one of the most influential forces in shaping me into the scientist I am today. \n\nMy interest in breast cancer mammography was stimulated by the misdiagnosis of my aunt's cancer. Shocked by the pitiful state of cancer detection today, I vowed to make my own contributions in the field. I scoured through online biology and computer science courses hunting for knowledge. Through a unique mindset, I developed algorithms to detect cancerous lesions in mammograms. I encountered many problems at this deep level of research, where many concepts remain undiscovered. I spent months dedicated to this research, and by obsessively pursuing this singular goal, I soon began making novel discoveries in my field. Through research, I discovered the importance of focus and learned to tame my procrastination. The path of research was strenuous, and many times after slaving away at problems for weeks, I felt like quitting. However, with the hard work and frustration came great rewards. The thrill I experienced when making a new discovery was unparalleled and drove me to continue research.\n\nBy presenting my project to various science fairs, I discovered the power of collaboration and iteratively improved my research. At the local science fair, judges helped bring my pr\noject to a new level. While presenting my project’s “big picture”, I critically reflected on the flaws in my research. Using my analytical observations and judges’ advice to enhance my project, I discovered the never-ending cycle of advancement in scientific research. At the state science fair, I received invaluable advice for future routes for my research. Surrounded by the brightest minds in California, I developed a network of friends, scientists, and mentors who guide my research to this day.\n\n Although that specific project stopped at the California State Science Fair, I still fight against cancer. Driven by a desire to change society’s understanding of cancer, I forked my research to modelling cancer proliferation, work that I submitted to 2 research competitions, Intel STS and Siemens Competition. To this day, my state science fair souvenir pin, the final memento from my project, rests on my suit lapel. It reminds me of my potential as a scientist and the infinite world of research. I don't think I will take it off. It means a lot to me."},{"_id":"4caa620961ef7acd130000b5","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1316563,"position":0.5,"parentId":"4b9b3760373a32e8d0000089","content":"#RD 2\n\nI’d never thought I’d be fighting cancer. Yet, a fortuitous breakthrough in my breast cancer detection program led to accurate predictions, and I was hurled onto the front line of research fighting against the malignant disease, cancer. Contacting various professors and obtaining data from universities, I developed an automated breast cancer detection algorithm. Unlike the many science fair projects I’ve completed in high school, this project fully immersed me into the world of scientific research. From its inception to final presentation at the California State Science Fair, my research has been one of the most influential forces in shaping me into the scientist I am today. \nMy research was inspired by the misdiagnosis of my aunt's cancer, which revealed to me pitiful state of cancer detection today. Shocked into action, I vowed to learn more and make my own contributions in the field. As I researched the nuances of breast cancer mammography, my interest piqued, and I obsessively scoured through countless computer science courses on Coursera and EdX and MIT OCW searching and learning. Having gained a sufficient base, I began my own independent work, developing algorithms to detect abnormalities in mammograms to find possible locations for a cancer. My ultimate programming challenge, I spent months iteratively designing and developing algorithms to isolate cancerous lesions. The path of research was perilous, and unaccustomed to pursuing computer science at such a deep level, where many concepts remain undiscovered, I encountered many problems. Realizing that I couldn't overcome these obstacles without complete focus, I learned to handle procrastination and my distractions. I faced many hardships throughout this project, and at many times, after slaving away at a problem for a week, I felt the urge to quit. Yet the thrill I experienced after correctly linking my model predictions with experimental data was unparalleled and drove me to continue on researching.\nHalf of being a scientist is doing the research; the other half is presenting it. After developing a sophisticated breast cancer detection, I entered the exciting science fair season. Through my local science fair, I gained exposure: talking with local professionals who helped me expand my project to a new level. When I was developing my algorithm, I was busy adjusting the minute details, but as I presented, I was able to take a step back and critically think. At the local fair, I received 1st place, and qualified for the state science fair. Reflecting back on my judge’s comments and my critical reflections, I delved further into my project and discovered the never-ending and constantly improving circular flow of research. At the state science fair, I once again presented my project, in its finality, to professionals in my field. At this event, I developed a network of friends, scientists, and mentors that exists with me today. I learned the power of collaboration, and discussing with my fellow top minds in California, I felt enlightened and empowered. \n Although my project stopped at the California State Science Fair, I still pursue cancer to this day. Still driven by a desire to change society’s understanding of cancer, I forked my project to the modelling of cancer proliferation, research that I submitted to 2 research competitions, Intel STS and Siemens Competition. \nThe final memento from this research, my state science fair pin, still rests on the front left flap of my suit. It reminds me of the gift of research, and the many ways it shaped my views as a scientist. I don't think I will take it off. It means a lot to me.\n"},{"_id":"4c3fa04b16336b5ef50000b2","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1144085,"position":1,"parentId":"4b9b3760373a32e8d0000089","content":"##RD 1\nA gulp of water. Quick glance at my watch. Another gulp. Trifold poster boards line as far down the aisle as I can see. Novel engine technology. Patterns in the human genome. Scientific research of the highest caliber lurks in every nook and cranny of the auditorium for the California State Science Fair. Standing in front of my posterboard detailing breast cancer diagnosis techniques, I silently await the well dressed man with a clipboard strolling towards me, ready to judge the fruits of my 6 months of research. < Insert Reference to Pin> \n\nMy research began as a series of completely accidental events that opened my eyes to the world of breast cancer diagnosis. The misdiagnosis of my aunt's cancer shocked me into action against the serious pitfalls in cancer diagnosis today. Dusting off an old image recognition software that I'd coded in my free time a couple of months ago, I set off to work. Hours whizzed by researching the nuances of breast cancer mammography, and I carefully designed and developed algorithms to isolate cancerous lesions. Many weeks were spent huddled at the computer,coding into the night. I scoured through countless computer science courses on Coursera and EdX and MIT OCW searching for the perfect algorithm. Despite my persistent attacks on the subject, my software was as good at predicting cancer as a coin flip. \n\nThe judge approaches, and I dive into the presentation. Emotion bleeds into my speech as I vicariously explain how my software eliminated the doctor from breast cancer testing. I enthusiastically describe the scientific concepts like parallax and bio-mimicry that reveal the intense research underlying my project. Self-reflecting on the experiment, I address flaws in my data-collecting procedures and discuss possible solutions. By connecting my discoveries with real-world applications, I relate the data to my goals and conclude my presentation. As the judge shakes my hand and walks away from my booth, the nervousness festering in my stomach evaporates, and a new feeling settles in: pride.\n\nWith my interview done with, my confidence is back and I begin to talk with my fellow intellectuals. As I meander around the aisles, I learn about human tissue mechanics, heart disease sensors, and solar panels. The projects around me not only astound me, but they also inspire me. As I stand alongside my peers, I converse with them, talking about our projects and ways we might overcome obstacles in our individual experiments. As a community, we collaborate to develop our understanding of the science behind the projects.\n\nThe California State Science Fair imbued me with a spirit of scientific discovery that lives on with me today. My fellow students have become a network of scientists that I rely upon for my research today. The lessons I learned from my judges helped me advance my project to a deeper level. In many ways, the state science fair has been defined the role of researcher and scientist that I play today.\n\n My science fair pin still sits on the front left flap of my suit. It reminds me of my project at the state science fair: the spirit of discovery that drove my project; the collaboration with my science fair judges that become my mentors; the creative thinking that led to my algorithms; the hours of hard work that .I don't think I will take it off. It means a lot to me.\n"},{"_id":"4b9a5c22373a32e8d0000082","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1186099,"position":9,"parentId":"46a7776f98be5bc1ea000045","content":"#USC\n\n*12/1/14 -- Done*"},{"_id":"4b9a5c69373a32e8d0000083","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":967631,"position":1,"parentId":"4b9a5c22373a32e8d0000082","content":"USC students are known to be involved. Briefly describe a non-academic pursuit (such as service to community or family, a club or sport, or work, etc.,) that best illustrates who you are, and why it is important to you. (250 word limit)\n"},{"_id":"4cd8e6786ba2de5c3e0000c0","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1225395,"position":1,"parentId":"4b9a5c69373a32e8d0000083","content":"A glint of silver flashes down my arm. With my shako set, I march onto the astroturf. The stands loom in front of me, crowded with spectators and judges. The stadium lights illuminate me, as the harsh sun had done through the countless full-day Saturday rehearsals. I am on the stage, and facing the audience, this is my moment. \n\nNo, this is our moment. I face my fellow marching band members, brought together by a passion for music. A bond forged by countless hours toiling for one unified goal, they have become my family. I feel a sense of paternal pride at my fellow flute players, who under my leadership as section leader, have improved drastically. As the drum major's hands go up, the show begins,and I give myself away to the music.\n\nWe find uniqueness in conformity. We wear identical uniforms, we march with similar technique, we are unique individuals who have become one. Yet ,through our music, we break this conformity and channel our inner soul. We paint an illusion from the first melodious note to the final brash statement, captivating the audience every step of the way. On the field, I realize, we make more than music. We make memories."},{"_id":"4b9a5cf4373a32e8d0000084","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1370778,"position":2,"parentId":"4b9a5c22373a32e8d0000082","content":"Describe your academic interests and how you plan to pursue them at USC. Please feel free to address your first- and second-choice major selections (250 word limit).\n"},{"_id":"4ce392576ba2de5c3e0000c3","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":5045506,"position":0.25,"parentId":"4b9a5cf4373a32e8d0000084","content":"##RD 1\nI drag my brush across the easel. My brushstrokes of magenta, turquoise, and scarlet blend to develop mystical shapes on the canvas. Adding the final touches, I step back to admire my work. I am not a conventional painter, per se. I don’t paint with oil pastels, colored pencils, or watercolor. I paint with code. Through programming, I use an artist’s touch, developing simple and elegant softwares. The thrill I receive from writing innovative code drives me, a passion I will pursue in college.\n\nTo me, programming is the synthesis of logic and art. Algorithms are pure logic, simple flowcharts that have a defined set of steps without any room for errant behavior. Yet, as I program the code for this flowchart into machine code, I add the artistic touch to the lifeless algorithm. While performing my independent scientific research on breast cancer , I was once tasked with using image analysis to find possible cancerous lesions on a mammogram. Although others attempted many times before unsuccessfully, I uniquely developed the algorithm, simulating rainfall on the image to find abnormal locations. This skillful artistic manipulation of a seemingly clearcut algorithm was the major breakthrough in my novel automated breast cancer detector.\n\nI unleash my creativity through the absolute logical world of programming. At USC, through classes and research in computer science, I hope to flourish my understanding of computers to find new imaginative ways to tackle the world's most complex problems.\n\n"},{"_id":"4cdd16176ba2de5c3e0000c1","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1170255,"position":0.5,"parentId":"4b9a5cf4373a32e8d0000084","content":"1. 0. With these two digits, I can manipulate 295 exabytesa level of information beyond con. The computer is a weapon of pure power, and I am entranced with . \n\n[Topic Sentence Here] Without a smartphone, I was left out of the Snapchat fad, so I coded an unofficial port of Snapchat onto the PC. Once, unhappy with the performance of my stocks, I developed a high-frequency stock simulator that observed minute patterns in the prices of stocks to pick the best stocks at the right time, with profits of 5% per day.\n\nI have performed independent scientific research over the last two years, using computer science and applied mathematics to understand and document the interactions between tumors and the cardiovascular system for cancer diagnosis purposes. Using theoretical computer concepts like machine learning, digital image analysis, and computational differential equations, I linked mammographic images to cancerous lesions to create a novel working prototype of an automated breast cancer detector.\n \nProgramming is more than a way of manipulating computers, for me it is a way to unleash creativity and an unique way of overcoming obstacles. At USC, I hope to learn to harness the tremendous power of computers to continue tackling the world's most complex problems."},{"_id":"4cdd1c216ba2de5c3e0000c2","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1170220,"position":0.75,"parentId":"4b9a5cf4373a32e8d0000084","content":""},{"_id":"4cd290fed3362189760000be","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1160017,"position":1,"parentId":"4b9a5cf4373a32e8d0000084","content":"\n\nThe pen may be mightier than the sword. But mightier than the pen is the computer. A machine that understands only two digits (1 and 0) yet knows more than any human can ever seek to comprehend. The computer is a weapon of pure power, and I am entranced with . \n\nThroughout high school, I've attempted to harness its power. My ventures in the field of programming are long and varied, yet with one common goal: to overcome my obstacles. Without a smartphone, I felt left out when Snapchat became the latest fad. Unphased, I developed an unofficial port of Snapchat onto the PC, and with a webcam, I could now converse with my friends on the Snapchat network. Once, fed up with how my stock picks were doing, I developed a high-frequency stock simulator, that observed minute patterns in the prices of stocks to pick the best stocks at the right time. Although I didn't have the bandwidth or money to support the operation, that proof-of-concept nearly earned me a constant 5% growth rate per day.\n\nBeyond my simple independent projects, I also apply computer science in research situations. Over the last two years, I've been engrossed in scientific research, using the power of computer science and applied mathematics to understand the interactions between tumors and the cardiovascular system. Using machine learning, image analysis techniques, and computational differential equations, I linked mammographic images to cancerous lesions to create the first working prototype of an automated breast cancer detector.\n \nIn college, I will pursue computer science and its practical applications with the same passion that drove me in high school. For me, programming is more than a way of instructing computers, it is a way to unleash creativity and an unique way of overcoming obstacles. At USC, I hope to gain fluency in the magnificent language of computer science to tackle the world's most complex problems."},{"_id":"4b9a5d80373a32e8d0000085","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1157157,"position":3,"parentId":"4b9a5c22373a32e8d0000082","content":"Describe yourself in three words.\n"},{"_id":"4ccb5a81d3362189760000bc","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1225383,"position":1,"parentId":"4b9a5d80373a32e8d0000085","content":"Elocutor, Dreamer, Quirky"},{"_id":"4b9a5dbd373a32e8d0000086","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1233136,"position":4,"parentId":"4b9a5c22373a32e8d0000082","content":"Favorite food:\nFavorite fictional character:\nGreatest invention of all time:\nWhat do you like to do for fun?\nRole model:\nFavorite book:\nBest movie of all time:\nFavorite musical performer/band or composer:\nDream job:\n"},{"_id":"4cc97804d3362189760000b8","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1233137,"position":1,"parentId":"4b9a5dbd373a32e8d0000086","content":"Favorite food: Pecan Pie\nFavorite fictional character: Jay Gatsby\nGreatest invention of all time: X-Ray Imaging \nWhat do you like to do for fun? Play pickup soccer\nRole model: Elon Musk\nFavorite book: Freakonomics\nBest movie of all time: The Godfather\nFavorite musical performer/band or composer: Eminem\nDream job: First Officer of the Starship Enterprise\n"},{"_id":"4cc986e2d3362189760000b9","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1156588,"position":5,"parentId":"4b9a5c22373a32e8d0000082","content":"Some people categorize engineers as geeks or nerds. Are you a geek, nerd, or neither? Why? (250 word limit)\n"},{"_id":"4ce45ec16ba2de5c3e0000c6","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1170835,"position":0.5,"parentId":"4cc986e2d3362189760000b9","content":"\t“I play kickball. Nerds don't play kickball, right?” In denial against the accusations of being a \"nerd\" and \"geek\" by my elementary school bullies, I buried my inner nerd away But nothing can be hidden forever. In high school, I channeled my inner nerd and discovered that being a nerd wasn't about dressing poorly and being socially awkward. Rather, through my “nerdy” extracurricular activities , I learned it involved expressing passion and curiosity about science. \n\n\tHave you ever used Wikipedia as a textbook? I do for Science Bowl, where I tackle abstruse science trivia questions from DNA replication to quantum states in stars. Participating in this activity,I bond with my fellow high-school scientists, satiate my thirst for knowledge, and expand the breadth of my understanding of science.\n\n\tThrough research, I scientifically explore the world around me. Over the past 6 years, my science fair projects have evolved from physical hardware projects on desalination and sprinkler optimization to researching theoretical mathematical projects like data compression and cancer detection. Through the simple act of scientifically investigating a problem, I discover and find new pathways, delving into the world of science.\n\n Science Bowl and my scientific research have changed my perceptions of being a nerd. As a nerd, I channel my scientific passion, an innate characteristic that fundamentally makes me unique. I have, always will be, and am proud to be a nerd."},{"_id":"4ccb5a21d3362189760000bb","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1170309,"position":1,"parentId":"4cc986e2d3362189760000b9","content":"I play kickball. Nerds don't play kickball, right?\n\nSticks and stones may break my bones, but words can only make me cry. As an ambitious toddler, words like \"nerd\" and \"geek\" were often hurled at me with malice. Whether bullies at school or simple students fed up with my passion for science, I felt the brunt of these words everyday as a kid. Closing up my passion, I drove myself away from these traditionally scientific disciplines . The truth is I am a geek. I'm a nerd. But above both of these, I'm a scientist. I am an self-proclaimed Linux geek, collecting minute trivia on the most misunderstood operating system.I am a programming nerd: deftly coding up new applications whenever time allows.As a nerd, I tweak with programming languages and code technical knowhow to develop the next Snapchat app, high frequency stock traders, or whatever my whimsical imagination leads me to. Together, my hunger for knowledge about computers and my drive to use this knowledge evolves me beyond the simple classifications of geek and nerd into my true form: a scientist\n\nMy computer is installed with operating systems that most people have never heard of. I eagerly read blogs about the latest operating systems and then go to r\n\nReading Wikipedia articles on these subjects for fun, I leapfrog around these pages, delving into the miniscule world quantum physics or the astronomical worlds or. For me, geekiness isn't a trait; it is a style of life. Although I am extremely passionate about a couple subjects (ask me about Linux, and you'll learn more than you'd ever wanted to know), I carry this hunger for knowledge wherever I go. In classes, I am the one hyper kid in the back, always asking the most abstruse questions, hoping to gather all the information I can.\n\nI am an devout programming nerd. Ever since learning my first programming language at age 7, I've been on a roll, learning and utilizing these languages to cook up everything that's been in my imagination. In reality, actually though, I justO\n\nI used to try hiding my nerdiness ipedia articles on these subjects for fun,\n\n\nI used to try hiding my nerdiness and geekiness as a kid. But lets face it, I'm the biggest nerd there is. I express my geeky desire for information through science bowl. I express my inner nerd through programming. Together, these accentuate my quirky passions for science. Indeed, this hunger for knowledge and desire to implement this knowledge shape me into the scientist I am today. I now accept that I'm a nerd: one that plays kickball nonetheless."},{"_id":"4ce45e966ba2de5c3e0000c5","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1170496,"position":2,"parentId":"4cc986e2d3362189760000b9","content":""},{"_id":"4cc98764d3362189760000ba","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1156593,"position":6,"parentId":"4b9a5c22373a32e8d0000082","content":"How do you plan to use your engineering degree to benefit society? (250 word limit)\n"},{"_id":"4ce3cf1a6ba2de5c3e0000c4","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1170788,"position":0.25,"parentId":"4cc98764d3362189760000ba","content":"##RD 3\n\n\n\nMembers of the Nobel Committee,\n\nI am ecstatic to be here, surrounded by the brightest minds in the world, to receive the Nobel Prize for my breakthroughs in the field of computer cryptography. As a child, I was obsessed with tackling society's problems. Through my science fair research, I pursued the fields of desalination, solar panel optimization , and breast cancer detection. Although I didn't have the knowledge to make severe dents in these fields, I was introduced to the world of research that brought me here today.\n\nEver curious by this world of computer science, I pursued it at USC, furthering my studies with a Masters degree and a PhD in cryptography. Now equipped with knowledge, I pursued the world of research, securing a position at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. I became obsessed with developing a new, more secure encryption algorithm to improve worldwide security. The path of research was perilous, and many times, I felt like quitting, but after years of hard work, I finally developed the first mathematically proven unbreakable cipher. \n\nAs a kid, I had one goal: change the world. Standing in front of the Nobel Committee today, amongst the most distinguished members of society, I realize my dream has come true. I accept this prize, and would like to express profound gratitude to my family, my computer science professors , mentors, and fellow researchers who have helped me make this world a better place one step at a time.\n"},{"_id":"4cd5277fd3362189760000bf","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1170274,"position":0.5,"parentId":"4cc98764d3362189760000ba","content":"## Rough Draft 2\n\nMembers of the Nobel Committee, Fellow laureates,\n\nI am ecstatic to be here with today to receive the Nobel Prize for Computer Science for my research in cryptography. Passionate about computer science ever since I was a little kid, studying at the University of Southern California, I gained knowledge to pursue my dreams. There at the Viterbi School of Englineering, I learned and acquired invaluable research experience that prepared me for my work in the world of computer science research. \n\nMy passion for computer science ignited, I completed my masters degree, exploring the nuances of cryptography. Before I knew it, I was a Doctor of Science, completing my PhD in my niche of numerical cryptography. I secured a research position at the largest technology corporation, ready to explore. As I explored the morphing field of cryptology, I discovered novel methods of encryption, ultimately leading to my breakthrough in the field that brings me here in front of the Nobel committee. \n\nAs a high schooler , I had one dream: change the world. With my undergraduate degree at USC and graduate studies in computer science, I received the toolkit required to achieve my dream. Indeed, it was my passion for computer science and this stellar education that allowed me to develop the first mathematically proven unbreakable cipher. Today, I accept this Nobel Prize with profound gratitude on behalf of my computer science teachers, mentors, and fellow researchers who helped me make my dream come true.\nThank you.\n"},{"_id":"4cd242b9d3362189760000bd","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1161622,"position":1,"parentId":"4cc98764d3362189760000ba","content":"\tI am ecstatic to be here with today to receive the Nobel Prize for Computer Science. I owe this award to many factors, my family, my supporting research environment, but most of all my undergraduate university, which immersed me into this world of computer science that I now rule today.\n\n\tEver since high school, I have been obsessed with changing the world through computer science, whether through creating a viral program like Facebook and Google or developing the next unbreakable cryptography cipher.While completing my engineering degree at the University of Southern California, I received this extensive knowledge that prepared me for my work in the world of research. \n\n\tI went on to complete my masters degree in computer science, fueling my passion for knowledge in the field of computer science. Studying for a PhD degree in my particular specialization, I researched attempting to discover something new in this extensive field, and after years of work, became a doctor of computer science. Finally, after much effort, I Immediately secured a research position at one of the major technology corporations of the time, ready to explore. Here, I thrived, constantly researching this ever-morphing field, ultimately leading to the stupendous breakthrough that brings me here in front of the Nobel committee. \n\n\tI walked out of USC knowing only one thing. I was here to change the world, and now I had the tools to achieve it. The knowledge I received at USC drove me into computer science, into the wonderful world of research, and has ultimately led to this prize that I now accept with profound gratitude on behalf of my fellow computer science researchers and budding engineers today."},{"_id":"4b7372098c0a5fb59000006f","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1384813,"position":10,"parentId":"46a7776f98be5bc1ea000045","content":"#Yale\n\n*1/1/15*"},{"_id":"4b7372428c0a5fb590000070","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1368009,"position":1,"parentId":"4b7372098c0a5fb59000006f","content":"What in particular about Yale has influenced your decision to apply?\n(100 Words)"},{"_id":"4cff5e5e0697a6ae06000100","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1373588,"position":1,"parentId":"4b7372428c0a5fb590000070","content":"Yale reminds me of Hogwarts. Within its elegant architecture, I find a homely and comforting environment I can excel in. \"Advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic\", and I hope to join Yale's cutting-edge Computer Science program.In particular,Yale's research in probabilistic distributed computing captivates me. Yale is my Hogwarts; on campus, in clubs, in classes, and in research, I see magic everywhere at Yale, ready for me to discover. "},{"_id":"4d80ecd9910f237e420000f1","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1296905,"position":2,"parentId":"4b7372428c0a5fb590000070","content":"Getting into the Hogwarts School of Wizardry was my childhood dream. Although my acceptance letter never arrived, I find resemblances in Yale's landscape and academia remind me of the Yale reminds me of Hogwarts, with its elegant castles and mansions that populate the campus. Sitting in a residential I feel at home I will recreate Gryffindor and Slytherin through. Most of all, at Yale, I find magical potential. Surrounded by students who"},{"_id":"4d81e737910f237e420000f3","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1297618,"position":2.5,"parentId":"4b7372428c0a5fb590000070","content":""},{"_id":"4d81a08f910f237e420000f2","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1297302,"position":3,"parentId":"4b7372428c0a5fb590000070","content":"ale reminds me of Hogwarts. With its elegant castles and mansions, a homely and comforting environment I can excel in. I will fit right into Yale's Quidditch team, and . Although Yale doesn't offer bachelors degrees in wizardry, \"advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic\", and I hope to pursue computer science research, on the cutting edge of discovery. I am entranced by Professor Aspnes's research in probabilistic discrete computing, and I hope to pursue similar projects here. Yale is my Hogwarts: a magestic manifestation of magic and technology where I can unleash my creativity. I see magic everywhere, ready for me to explore. "},{"_id":"4b7372a58c0a5fb590000071","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":948380,"position":2,"parentId":"4b7372098c0a5fb59000006f","content":"What excites you intellectually, really? (250 Characters - 40 Words)\n"},{"_id":"4d337cb02b4b3740280000ee","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1373589,"position":0.5,"parentId":"4b7372a58c0a5fb590000071","content":"Decoding real-life problems using math and code stimulates me. I mathematically model cancer proliferation and perform high-frequency stock trading through software machine learning. I hope to continue these pursuits at Yale. "},{"_id":"4cff5ec10697a6ae06000101","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1235602,"position":1,"parentId":"4b7372a58c0a5fb590000071","content":"I enjoy applying mathematics and computer science to real world problems. I've mathematically modelled cancer proliferation and performed high-frequency stock trading through math and code. The challenge of looking at problems mathematically stimulates me, and I hope to continue doing so at Yale. "},{"_id":"4b7378028c0a5fb590000072","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":948384,"position":3,"parentId":"4b7372098c0a5fb59000006f","content":"Think about a disappointment you have experienced. What was your response? (250 Char)"},{"_id":"4cff5f3b0697a6ae06000102","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1373590,"position":1,"parentId":"4b7378028c0a5fb590000072","content":"Rank 40/62. My robot was scrap metal,severely outclassed in competition. Infuriated by the loss, I toiled over my robot, relentlessly striving for perfection. The next competition was a fairy tale: an underdog robot rallying back to win it all."},{"_id":"4b7378f18c0a5fb590000073","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1373586,"position":4,"parentId":"4b7372098c0a5fb59000006f","content":"Suite-style living - four to six students sharing a set of rooms - may be an integral part of your Yale College experience. What would you contribute to the dynamic of your suite? (250 Char)"},{"_id":"4d68e3faf99da34d3f0000f0","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1373591,"position":2,"parentId":"4b7378f18c0a5fb590000073","content":"Science says that smiling requires less energy than frowning. Call me lazy, but I am always smiling. I banish my problems with my endless supply of corny jokes and an \"win it all\" attitude, a mindset I will bring to Yale . "},{"_id":"4b7379c98c0a5fb590000074","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1235684,"position":5,"parentId":"4b7372098c0a5fb59000006f","content":"What do you wish you were better at being or doing? (250 Char)\n"},{"_id":"4e0ddc25258ae903b500010c","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1373592,"position":1.5,"parentId":"4b7379c98c0a5fb590000074","content":"My strokes and lines melt together on my sketchpad. I’m convinced this painting will surpass the Mona Lisa. My friend’s voice jars me, “You drew a stick figure?” Quickly hiding my portrait from my friend, I resolve to draw better next time."},{"_id":"4d41239c6b0c42426a0000ee","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1297761,"position":2,"parentId":"4b7379c98c0a5fb590000074","content":"My strokes and lines melt together on my sketchpad. I was convinced that this painting would surpass the Mona Lisa.\"You drew a stick figure?\" My friend's voice jars me from my illusion, and I quickly hide my simplistic portrait from my friend. Next time, I'll draw better."},{"_id":"4b737c4e8c0a5fb590000075","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":948393,"position":6,"parentId":"4b7372098c0a5fb59000006f","content":"In this essay, please reflect on something you would like us to know about you that we might not learn from the rest of your application, or on something about which you would like to say more. You may write about anything—from personal experiences or interests to intellectual pursuits. (Please answer in 500 words or less). "},{"_id":"4cff60c30697a6ae06000105","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1355969,"position":1,"parentId":"4b737c4e8c0a5fb590000075","content":"## Harvard Essay Verbatim"},{"_id":"4de9677d83194c91910000fd","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1384817,"position":11.5,"parentId":"46a7776f98be5bc1ea000045","content":"##University of Pennsylvania"},{"_id":"4de96aa983194c91910000fe","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":5045501,"position":1,"parentId":"4de9677d83194c91910000fd","content":"The Admissions Committee would like to learn why you are a good fit for your undergraduate school choice (College of Arts and Sciences, School of Nursing, The Wharton School, or Penn Engineering). Please tell us about specific academic, service, and/or research opportunities at the University of Pennsylvania that resonate with your background, interests, and goals. (400-650 words)"},{"_id":"4de96bd683194c91910000ff","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":5045503,"position":1,"parentId":"4de96aa983194c91910000fe","content":"##Adapt This Prompt\n\nI've hit a wall. Scanning research articles and my code for weeks hasn't made any headway, yet the algorithm seems tantalizingly close. I reflect upon the transformation of my simple mammogram processing research into automated breast cancer detection. Yet, one key aspect of my research, detecting irregularities, still eludes me. The solution strikes 4,000 ft up a mountain, miles away from the technology that propels my research.\n\nKneeling down by a creek to quench my thirst, a sight catches my eye. In my peripherals, rainfall trickles through the dirt and accumulates on the surface. Racing with ideas, I theorize that simulated rainfall on a system would accumulate near the cancerous abnormalities. Small observations like these trigger my best inspirations. At Caltech, I will work with my fellow students to find simple solutions for the complex problems I encounter in class and research.\n\nWith only pen and notepad, I flesh out the rainfall idea into a practical abnormality detector. Borrowing algorithms from my EdX and Coursera data analysis courses, I create a prototype of the rainfall algorithm, which is slow and inefficient. Utilizing a design review I learned from robotics, I repetitively optimize the code, and explore alternative algorithms to enhance my design. At Caltech, professors of applied mathematics and other scientific disciplines will teach me new statistical analysis techniques to further enhance the ideas that I derive.\n\nHunched over a laptop, furiously typing code for hours, my research comes to life. I design simulations and experiments to test whether the problem is fixed. Fetching a few abnormal cancerous images, my detection algorithm boots up, and the test begins. \"30% complete.\" Anxiety claws at me. \"60%\" . Nervousness racks my body, and the progress counter seems to slow down. \"100%\". Finally, the program exits, and I quickly scan the results. One line pops out \"Cancer status: positive; Type: Abnormal Lesion.\" I leap up out of my chair in excitement and celebrate the success of my algorithm.The significance of my success hits me.I am no longer reading the book of science. I am writing it.\n\nResearch drives me to discover and pursue society's problems. My enthusiasm for research will bleed into my peers at Caltech, and together we will discuss problem sets and our endeavors outside of classes. I will frequent the Annenburg Center to glean knowledge from my esteemed professors. As I brainstorm answers to my research questions sitting next to the turtle pond, perhaps the sight of a turtle poking its head above a lily will inspire a solution. Caltech's academic rigor and supportive family will best prepare me for my future in graduate school and research beyond. In ten years, with my knowledge in mathematics from Caltech, I hope to be tackling the world's problems and making a difference."},{"_id":"4dfacd00a194f4b569000106","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1365216,"position":1,"parentId":"4de96bd683194c91910000ff","content":"While speaking with a college representative of the University of Pennsylvania, I learned the hands-on nature. As I've discovered through labs in high school and my research, I learn best when I work hands on. \n\nI've always had one goal: change the world. This goal has inspired me to \n\nRobotics \n\nResearch on Computational Biology and Bioinformatics -- The work of professors at the University of Pennsylvania \n\nSummer Undergraduate Research in Engineering (SURE) -- Hope to expand my horizons \n\nPenn Research in Machine Learning (PRiML)\n\n\n\n\n"},{"_id":"4de95c9f83194c91910000fa","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1384816,"position":12,"parentId":"46a7776f98be5bc1ea000045","content":"##Cornell\n*1/1/2015*"},{"_id":"4de95d5c83194c91910000fb","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1355980,"position":1,"parentId":"4de95c9f83194c91910000fa","content":"##Engineering\n\nTell us about an engineering idea you have, or about your interest in engineering. Describe how your ideas and interests may be realized by—and linked to—specific resources within the College of Engineering. Finally, explain what a Cornell Engineering education will enable you to accomplish. (Please limit your response to 650 words.)"},{"_id":"4df3fdc8bac0136b3b000103","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1373311,"position":1,"parentId":"4de95d5c83194c91910000fb","content":"My interest lie in applying CS+Math to other departments\n--Cornell's expansive program will help me explore my interests\n\nCS-Based\n-Computation Biology\n-Rigorous Program\n\nCornell's campus takes my breath away. I've hope to explore the magnificent lands around Ithaca, constantly delving for more inspiration.\n\nYour school inspires me, because it challenges students in an insightful and meaningful way, and because, even in the middle of a big city, it's one of warmest and most thoughtful campuses I have ever visited."},{"_id":"4b9b6200373a32e8d000008a","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1384819,"position":13,"parentId":"46a7776f98be5bc1ea000045","content":"#Harvard\n\n*1/1/15*"},{"_id":"4b9b626d373a32e8d000008b","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":967833,"position":1,"parentId":"4b9b6200373a32e8d000008a","content":"You may wish to include an additional essay if you feel that the college application forms do not provide sufficient opportunity to convey important information about yourself or your accomplishments. You may write on a topic of your choice, or you may choose from one of the following topics: \n- Unusual circumstances in your life\n- Travel or living experiences in other countries\n- What you would want your future college roommate to know about you\n- An intellectual experience (course, project, book, discussion, paper, poetry, or research topic in engineering, mathematics, science or other modes of inquiry) that has meant the most to you\n- How you hope to use your college education\n- A list of books you have read during the past twelve months "},{"_id":"4e018e0d93a54c00eb000109","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":2047254,"position":0.125,"parentId":"4b9b626d373a32e8d000008b","content":"*“I am on a mobius strip. I keep walking around in circles, and the path is endless. I keep searching for an exit, but my mental strength constantly weakens, sapped of resolve.\"*\n\n\tMy cancer diagnosis research has hit a wall. A crucial surface area algorithm has bottlenecked my cancer simulation, preventing any further development. For 4 weeks, I studied research articles, tested various algorithms, and tenaciously wrote code, all to no avail. My determination was flagging, and today was destined to be another fruitless search. In this darkest hour, I discovered the beauty of research. Harnessing science's innate creativity, I developed connections between Legos and tumors to optimize cancer diagnosis. \n\n\tMy research was sparked by the false-positive diagnosis of my aunt's cancer. Mentally and medically destroyed by a disease she didn't possess, der misdiagnosis inspired me to pursue cancer diagnosis. Hungering for knowledge, I studied several computation biology and data analysis courses on Coursera, EdX, and MIT OCW . I independently sought out to develop a novel mathematical model of interactions between cardiovascular systems and tumors to diagnose cancer criticality. Undiscovered concepts and puzzling problems riddled my path of research. Although I had managed to persevere through most of the barriers, the calculation of cellular surface area had me stumped. My initial algorithm was incredibly slow, requiring redesign. Developing and testing new algorithms all led to the same inefficiency. Mathematical biology textbooks and research journals lay strewn on my desk, all without solutions. Having exhausted every resource available to me, I was back at square one. I began having doubts and and my enthusiasm dwindled.\n\n\tAs it turned out, I was searching in the wrong place. My solution came as I built a Lego set with my toddler cousin. My interest piqued when she attempted to count the number of Legos in the tower, but mistakenly counted the number of sides. Laughing, I corrected her, when it hit me like a freight train. By visualizing a cancerous cell as a composition of Lego-like structures, I could develop a new surface area algorithm. For the first time in weeks, I felt driven by purpose. Through the fog of my elation, I realized that I was no longer reading the book of science; I was \nwriting it.\n\n\tMy journey pursuing cancer diagnosis has shaped my life in many ways. Research gifted me a high level of knowledge about dynamical mathematical models, cancerous biochemical interactions, and computer-based analyses. The high-level problems taught me the importance of focus and whittled away my procrastination. Most of all, research gave me the gift of creativity: the ability to look at problems through unique perspectives. It still amazes me how Legos, a simple childrens’ toy, helped me develop an innovative surface area algorithm. My final major roadblock gone, my simulation unveiled a new view on cancer criticality, research I submitted to Intel STS and the Siemens Research Competition, pending publication. I encounter new obstacles more challenging and confounding than ever, but I conquer them with my imagination. In research, school, and life, I tackle my problems with diligence, perseverance, and most importantly, panache.\n\n(517 words)\n"},{"_id":"4e00f8c793a54c00eb000108","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1368174,"position":0.25,"parentId":"4b9b626d373a32e8d000008b","content":"*“I keep walking, but the path is endless. I am on a mobius strip, walking around in circles, without escape. I shall keep searching, but my mental strength constantly weakens, sapped of resolve.”*\n\tMy cancer diagnosis research has hit a wall. A crucial surface area algorithm has bottlenecked my cancer simulation, preventing any further development. For 4 weeks, I'd studied research articles, tested various algorithms, and tenaciously wrote code, all to no avail. My determination was flagging, and today was destined to be another fruitless search.In my darkest hour before the dawn, I discovered the beauty of research. Harnessing the power of creativity in research, I developed connections between Legos and tumors to optimize cancer diagnosis. \n\tMy research was sparked by the false-positive diagnosis of my aunt's cancer. Destroyed by a disease she didn't possess, Her misdiagnosis inspired me to pursue cancer diagnosis. Hungering for knowledge, I studied several computation biology and data analysis courses on Coursera, EdX, and MIT OCW . Several local professors rejected my research proposal for their lab, so I independently sought out to develop a novel mathematical model of interactions between cardiovascular systems and tumors to diagnose cancer criticality. Undiscovered concepts and puzzling problems riddled my path of research. Although I had managed to persevere through most of the barriers, the calculation of cellular surface area had me stumped. My initial algorithm was incredibly slow, requiring redesign. Developing and testing new algorithms all led to the same inefficiency. Mathematical biology textbooks and research journals lay strewn on my desk, all without solutions. Having exhausted every resource available to me, I was back at square one, and I began having doubts and and my drive began to dwindle.\n\tAs it turned out,research articles and programming references didn't have the answers. My solution came as I built a Lego set with my toddler cousin. My interest piqued when she attempted to count the number of Legos in the tower, but mistakenly counted the number of sides. Laughing, I corrected her, when it hit me like a freight train. By visualizing a cancerous cell as a composition of Lego-like structures, I could develop a new surface area algorithm. For the first time in weeks, I feel driven by purpose. Through the fog of my elation, I realize that I am no longer reading the book of science; I am writing it.\n\tMy journey pursuing cancer diagnosis has shaped my life in many ways. Research gifted me a high level of knowledge about dynamical mathematical models, cancerous biochemical interactions, and computer-based analyses. The high-level problems taught me the importance of focus and whittled away my procrastination. Most of all, research gave me the gift of creativity: the ability to look at problems through unique perspectives. It still amazes me how Legos, a simple childrens’ toy, helped me diagnose cancer criticality, research I submitted to Intel STS and the Siemens Research Competition, pending publication. I encounter new obstacles more challenging and confounding than ever, but I conquer them with my imagination. In research, school, and life, I tackle my problems with diligence, perseverance, and most importantly, panache.\n\n(517 words)\n"},{"_id":"4dec954799fade977c000102","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1357442,"position":0.5,"parentId":"4b9b626d373a32e8d000008b","content":"##RD 2\n*“Day 27:\n I keep walking, but the path is endless. I am on a mobius strip, walking around in circles, without escape. I shall keep searching, but my mental strength constantly weakens, sapped of resolve.”*\n\nMy mathematical research on cancer diagnosis has hit a wall. A crucial surface area algorithm in my cancer simulation was unbearably slow, preventing any further development. Mathematical biology textbooks lay strewn on my desk, searching for new algorithms to eliminate this plague that invaded my project. My determination was flagging, and today seemed to be no different. Another fruitless search, another step further into this dismal pit I’ve dug myself into. But today, I abandoned the literature: the textbooks, research articles, my algorithms. Relying solely on the nuances of my imagination, I related Legos and tumors to optimize cancer diagnosis. \n\tMy research was sparked by the false-positive diagnosis of my aunt's cancer. Barraged by cancer inhibiting medications, she was destroyed by a disease she didn't possess. Her misdiagnosis inspired me to pursue cancer diagnostic research. Hungering for any knowledge on the subject, I studied several courses on Coursera, EdX, and MIT OCW searching and learning. <Add professors> Through my independent research, I developed a novel mathematical model of interactions between the cardiovascular system and tumors to diagnose cancer criticality.\n\n \tUndiscovered concepts and puzzling problems riddled my path of research. One of the most momentous problems tracking the movement of cancer in my research required the calculation of cellular surface area. My initial algorithm was flawed, and required a complete redesign. Unfazed, I labored on, researching and testing different algorithms, and reading contemporary research articles. Yet, two weeks have passed, but the negative results still pile up and my drive begins to dwindle.\n\n\tA lego thrown at me distracts me from the many flashing red errors on my computer. Snapping out of my coding daze, I notice my cousin building a Lego tower. Welcoming a distraction from my gloomy research, I join her construction. My interest is piqued when she attempts to count the number of Legos in the tower, but mistakenly counts the number of sides. Laughing, I correct her, when it hits me like a freight train. By visualizing a cancerous cell as a composition of Lego-like structures, I develop a new surface area algorithm. For the first time in weeks, I feel driven by purpose.My algorithm is successful, and through the fog of elation, I realize that I am no longer reading the book of science; I am writing it.\n\tThrough my pursuit, I have unearthed the significance of imagination. Studying and developing in an environment where much is undiscovered, to make progress and make new developments requires an unique perspective. Research gifted me a high level of knowledge about dynamical mathematical models, cancerous biochemical interactions, and computer-based analyses. Through the intensity of problems, I discovered the importance of focus and learned to tame my procrastination. But most of all, research gave me the gift of creativity: the ability to look at problems through unique perspectives. It still amazes me how Legos, a simple childrens’ toy, helped me diagnose cancer criticality, research I submitted to Intel STS and the Siemens Research Competition, pending publication. \nI encounter new obstacles more challenging and confounding than ever, but I conquer them with my imagination. In research, school, and life, I tackle my problems with diligence, perseverance, and most importantly, panache.\n"},{"_id":"4cff65480697a6ae0600010a","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1316519,"position":1,"parentId":"4b9b626d373a32e8d000008b","content":"Beyond my window, a sheet of rain masks the outside. I sit on my bed, thinking of ideas to overcome this new problem, but can’t put ideas to paper. I was wiped out, running on empty, and soon succumbed to my tiredness. Performing calculations into the rainy night, my computer contently whirs, permeating the melodic drumbeats of the rain. Deep in my subconscious, nature and my research coalesce into one seemingly unified being.\n\n*There was a whispering in the beautiful sunny morning weather. The sky was like a dome of plasma-blue, and the clouds drifted under the gleaming disc of sun.*\n\nMy interest in breast cancer mammography was stimulated by the misdiagnosis of my aunt's cancer. Shocked by the pitiful state of cancer detection today, I vowed to make my own contributions in the field. I scoured through online biology and computer science courses hunting for knowledge. Through a unique mindset, I developed algorithms to detect cancerous lesions in mammograms.\n\n*At first, a tapping on the window, then a deluge. The distinct clink-clink of raindrops on the roof melded into a constant whir, as the water drenched the landscape. The gray clouds extinguished the passionate light of the molten-gold sun, leaving only darkness and despair.*\n\nMy journey in mathematical modelling of blood vessels in cancer has taken me through many strange avenues. Tracking the movement of cancer required the calculation of cellular surface area. My initial software was unbearably slow, a seemingly simple case of inefficient code. Further testing revealed that the algorithm was flawed, and required a complete redesign. Unfazed, I labored on, researching and testing different algorithms, and reading contemporary research articles. Yet, two weeks have passed, but the negative results still pile up and my drive begins to dwindle. \n\n*As the rain subsided, a silent mist drifted mist-like towards the molten-gold sun. The rain eroded the outer shell of the landscape, exposing a new unique inner beauty.* \n\nInspiration strikes on a play-date with my 6 year old cousin. Trying to count her Legos, instead she accidentally counts the sides. Immediately, I theorize that calculating the surface area like counting sides of Legos would speed up the algorithm. A hectic coding session finalizes and confirms the result. \"Completion Time: 1.2 minutes\". Away from the technology that drives my research, reflections and inspirations help me overcome the challenges.\n\n*A glittering rainbow shines over the sky, the only remnants from the ravaging rainstorm. Yet on the horizon, dark clouds loom, chaos ready to strike.* \n\nResearch continues to throw curveballs at me, but I don't give up. When the challenge seems insurmountable, I remember the reason I research: beyond the obstacle lies a goal worth fighting for."},{"_id":"4dec951199fade977c000101","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1357376,"position":2,"parentId":"4b9b626d373a32e8d000008b","content":""},{"_id":"4b9b64cd373a32e8d000008c","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1384828,"position":14,"parentId":"46a7776f98be5bc1ea000045","content":"#Harvey Mudd\n\n*1/1/15*"},{"_id":"4b9b6505373a32e8d000008d","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":967889,"position":1,"parentId":"4b9b64cd373a32e8d000008c","content":"Supplemental Essay"},{"_id":"4b9b6552373a32e8d000008e","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":967890,"position":1,"parentId":"4b9b6505373a32e8d000008d","content":"“Scientific research is a human endeavor. The choices of topics that we research are based on our biases, our beliefs, and what we bring: our cultures and our families. The kinds of problems that people put their talents to solving depends on their values.” -Dr. Clifton Poodry. How has your own background influenced the types of problems you want to solve?"},{"_id":"4b9b65eb373a32e8d000008f","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":967892,"position":2,"parentId":"4b9b6505373a32e8d000008d","content":"In a world where technology continually adapts and progresses, Harvey Mudd College expects that our students will be aware of the impact of their work on society. How would you use new advances to improve your life and/or the lives of those around you? Describe your idea and its potential impact. Feel free to be as creative or as practical as you like.\n"},{"_id":"4b9b65f9373a32e8d0000090","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1297909,"position":3,"parentId":"4b9b6505373a32e8d000008d","content":"What is one thing we won’t know about you after reading your application that you haven’t already reported in the Common Application “Additional Information” section?"},{"_id":"4de9612183194c91910000fc","treeId":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","seq":1355993,"position":1,"parentId":"4b9b65f9373a32e8d0000090","content":"#This One\n##Harvard Essay Verbatim"}],"tree":{"_id":"46a7775c98be5bc1ea000043","name":"College Essays","publicUrl":"college-essays"}}