• #Deer Hunt Scene

    • Idea of Calum sacrificing his safety for the dear’s life
      • Shows that Calum (who represents innocent, pre-fall man) is one with nature
      • Willing to sacrifice himself for it.
      • Also, he did not wish to participate in the deer hunt in the first place
  • #Beach Hut Scene

  • #Calum's Death Scene

  • #Dear Drive Scene

    • Aristocracy sacrifice nature for their own intents and purposes
      • Calum contrasts with the aristocracy, who sacrifice nature for their own purposes.
      • They see it as below them, so
  • #`She spoke with a sense of sacrifice (Calum’s death)`

  • #Deer Drive Scene

    • Idea of the aristocracy controlling nature
      • Calum, out of love for nature and the deer, tries to stop everyone from killing it; Duror ensures this fails
      • LRC blames Calum entirely for the Drive becoming a fiasco, despite him being forced to come against his will, due to LRC herself
      • An example that the aristocracy not only see nature as theirs to do what they like with, but also that they can simply dismiss the opinions of those lower than them, taking control regardless of morals
      • They see themselves as ruling over nature, and do not think of the consequences of harming it
  • #Beach Hut

    • Idea of the aristocracy controlling nature
  • #Calum's Death

    • Idea of aristocracy losing control over nature (?)
  • #Other Relevant Scene

  • #Deer Drive Scene (UNFINISHED)

    • Idea of war between Calum and Duror
      • Duror has the chance to send the Cone-Gatherers away, but does not take it
      • He cannot allow them to go and be happy; that it not the revenge he needs
      • Even his death alone is not enough, for “his going must be a destruction, an agony, a crucifixion”
      • Idea that death is not a big deal to the lower classes, and in order to truly wreak revenge on him, a worse punishment must be empolyed
  • #Beach Hut Scene

  • #Calum's Death Scene

  • #Other Relevant Scene

  • #Post-Deer Hut Scene

    • One’s death being another’s gain / Peggy’s life is a burden/inconvenience
      • Previous to the death scene, Duror has a dream where Peggy dies
      • He suddenly wonders if the dream is true (“was Peggy really dead?”; he becomes lighthearted and happy (“Suddenly it was as if the burden of misery had been lifted from him”)
      • This shows again that for Duror, it would be better for Peggy to die; rather than see her as a living being, her life is a burden to him, and her death a relief, rather than a tragedy of the loss of a human life
      • Shows that Duror hates his life so much, due to his ties to Peggy, that her death is a willing price to pay for his freedom - she is reduced to a burden, and her life an exchangeable property
  • #Deer Hunt Scene

    • Idea of death not being pain enough
      • Duror has the chance to send the Cone-Gatherers away, but does not take it
      • He cannot allow them to go and be happy; that it not the revenge he needs
      • Even his death alone is not enough, for “his going must be a destruction, an agony, a crucifixion”
      • Idea that death is not a big deal to the lower classes, and in order to truly wreak revenge on him, a worse punishment must be empolyed
  • #Beach Hut Scene

    • Idea of the risk of death is little compared to that of Lady Runcie-Campbell’s comfort
      • Brothers break into the hut, in order to save themselves from the storm, especially considering that Neil has “rheumatics, and [Calum’s] chest is weak”
      • However, upon discovering them, Lady Runcie-Campbell demands they leave - only to then take advantage of the fire they lit
      • Shows that the aristocracy considers the lower classes as servants for their bidding, and they should not have to worry about their wellbeing - the former’s comfort is more important than the latter’s life
      • “Risking death is but a forfeit for being in a lower class, and risk of death is a inconvenience for others, rather than a terrible tragedy/loss of life”
  • #Calum's Death Scene

    • Idea of Calum’s death being an inconvenience for LRC
      • LRC “prayed that Duror… had not hurt the cone-gatherers, not for their sakes… but for her son’s”
      • Again, the death of a lower-class member is not seen from their point of view, with the loss of a life, but rather as the loss of a utility, to rescue her son.
      • Calum’s death is a problem for her, not them
      • Humans are degraded to their uses, the lower class to what they can do for the upper, and death to an inconveniance
  • #Deer Hunt Scene COPYPASTED, MUST RELEVENTIFY)

    • Idea of death not being pain enough
      • Duror has the chance to send the Cone-Gatherers away, but does not take it
      • He cannot allow them to go and be happy; that it not the revenge he needs
      • Even his death alone is not enough, for “his going must be a destruction, an agony, a crucifixion”
      • Idea that death is not a big deal to the lower classes, and in order to truly wreak revenge on him, a worse punishment must be empolyed
  • #Beach Hut Scene COPYPASTED, MUST RELEVENTIFY

    • Idea of the risk of death is little compared to that of Lady Runcie-Campbell’s comfort
      • Brothers break into the hut, in order to save themselves from the storm, especially considering that Neil has “rheumatics, and [Calum’s] chest is weak”
      • However, upon discovering them, Lady Runcie-Campbell demands they leave - only to then take advantage of the fire they lit
      • Shows that the aristocracy considers the lower classes as servants for their bidding, and they should not
        have to worry about their wellbeing - the former’s comfort is more important than the latter’s life
        - "Risking death is but a forfeit for being in a lower class, and risk of death is a inconvenience for others, rather than a terrible tragedy/loss of life"
  • #Calum's Death Scene

  • #Other Relevant Scene

  • #Deer Drive Scene

    • Idea of Calum’s human rights (to his views) being disregarded
      • Calum, out of love for nature and the deer, tries to stop everyone from killing it; Duror ensures this fails
      • LRC blames Calum entirely for the Drive becoming a fiasco, despite him being forced to come against his will, due to LRC herself
      • An example that the aristocracy not only see nature as theirs to do what they like with, but also that they can simply dismiss the opinions of those lower than them, taking control regardless of morals
  • #Deer Drive Scene
    - Idea of the aristocracy controlling nature

  • #Beach Hut Scene

    • Idea of the risk of death is little compared to that of Lady Runcie-Campbell’s comfort
      • Brothers break into the hut, in order to save themselves from the storm, especially considering that Neil has “rheumatics, and [Calum’s] chest is weak”
      • However, upon discovering them, Lady Runcie-Campbell demands they leave - only to then take advantage of the fire they lit
      • Shows that the aristocracy considers the lower classes as servants for their bidding, and they should not have to worry about their wellbeing - the former’s comfort is more important than the latter’s life
        - "Risking death is but a forfeit for being in a lower class, and risk of death is a inconvenience for others, rather than a terrible tragedy/loss of life"
  • #Calum's Death Scene

    • Idea of Calum’s death being an inconvenience for LRC
      • LRC “prayed that Duror… had not hurt the cone-gatherers, not for their sakes… but for her son’s”
      • Again, the death of a lower-class member is not seen from their point of view, with the loss of a life, but rather as the loss of a utility, to rescue her son.
      • Calum’s death is a problem for her, not them
      • Humans are degraded to their uses, the lower class to what they can do for the upper, and death to an inconveniance
  • With but a glance, the reader sees the poem is broken: broken into two stanzas, each stanza broken into pairs or lines, and the lines in each pair being of longer then shorter length. One could disregard this as mere layout, but Carson goes one step further; he breaks his sentences where they are not supposed to be broken. A prime example can be found in the second and third pairs of lines, reading:
    “…And the
    explosion
    itself- an…”
    By breaking up the sentence in so many places - across three lines, two line pairs, the dash breaking the sentence yet again and the conjunction “and” indicating that it should be joined to the previous sentence – Carson makes clear the point he is trying to make; this exploding bomb is a result of language and communication exploding, leaving it as unusable fragments, as when communication cannot be used to resolve a situation, violence is all that remains, as clearly was the case during the Troubles

  • Carson goes on to describe the scene around him, using his language as a cluster metaphor.

    • He tells us that the scene around him s “a fount of broken type” - just as broken words and jumbled letters are the useless and meaningless remains of once-powerful/authoritative words, so too have the once powerful buildings been reduced to pathetic, helpless rubble.
    • “An asterisk on the map” also perfectly captures the blotting-out and outward-moving effects of the bomb; it also notes it as a key incident, as asterisks are used for notes and references.
    • The title uses juxtaposition; “Belfast”, a word with negative connotations due to implications of political unrest and upheaval, is put beside “confetti”, an item used most commonly at joyous occasions, such as weddings. This juxtaposition again displays the confusion of what is happening, as no-one knows who is right or wrong, or even what right and wrong even are.

    This shows how XYZ

  • However, Carson also reverses this, and uses the scene around him to mimic what is happening to communication.

    • Referring again to “a fount of broken type”, we see that just as the buildings have been reduced to useless, helpless rubble, with every violent act that occurs during the Troubles, communication and the use and meaning of words is also, slowly but surely, bit by bit, being blown apart.
    • Just as “Nuts, bolts, nails” are small things that hold massive structures together, so too do small words hold together the infrastructure of a community - yet, both of these are lying about uselessly, having been destroyed by violence such as this bomb.
    • Carson’s escape is “blocked with stops and colons” - the stopping (“stops”) and delaying (“colons”) of communication is preventing anyone’s escape from the trap of violence, even though discussing a way out of the problem will very quickly resolve it.
  • #Questions
    1) Choose a poem which deals with an important issue such as war, crime, poverty or racism.
    Explain how the poet deepens your understanding of the issue by the choice of content and the skillful use of poetic techniques.

    • Simply right the bog-standard WXYZ structure conflict etc etc essay

    5) Choose a poem which arouses strong emotion in you.
    Describe how you feel about the poem, and explain how the poet leads you to feel this way.

    • Write above essay, but from angle of “the breakdown of language obviously enrages and hurts Carson, and he conveys this hurt and anger well to us, so that I also feel the emotion”

    6) Choose a poem in which the poet creates a particular mood or atmosphere.
    Show how the poet creates this mood or atmosphere by his or her choice of subject matter and use of poetic techniques.

    • Above essay, but emphasis on the emotions Carson feels - anger, fear, and the scene makes him and us feel all that
    • Can also be combined w/Description Q
  • #Plan
    PCQE 1 - Structure/Layout mimics language breakdown
    PCQE 2 - Cluster Metaphor - Scene (description) mimics language breakdown
    PCQE 3 - Unfairness of fight - Authorities have communication
    PCQE 4 - General - Juxtaposition, backwards poem, etc etc all mimics language breakdown

  • #Intro
    Belfast Confetti by Ciaron Carson is an emotive poem about a terrorist bombing dureing the Troubles, with effectively uses many techniques - in particular, a cluster metaphor of language - to convey important issues in his poem, including his most important message: that the source of all this violence is the breakdown of language and communication.

  • #Structure/Layout
    With but a glance at the poem, the reader can immediately tell that it is broken: broken into two stanzas, each stanza broken into four or five line pairs, and the lines in each pair having a line of longer then shorter length. One could disregard this as mere layout, but Carson goes one further; he breaks his sentences where they are not supposed to be broken. A prime example can be found in the second and third pairs of lines, reading “…And the/explosion/itself- an…” By breaking up the sentence in so many places - across three lines, across two line pairs, that dash breaking up the sentence yet again and the conjunction “and” implying that the sentence should be joined to the previous one - Carson cleverly mimics both the physical destruction and the destruction of language encompassing the victim, as when surrounded by such a broken poem, we cannot help but visualise the brokenness of communication that is going on, and it is no surprise to us that such violence should break out.

  • #Scene mimics what is happening to language
    However, Carson uses another tactic to make his mark about the Troubles in another, deeper way: the use of a language cluster metaphor. In any argument, there will always be opposing views, and violence is always the worst way to work out which of these views are correct. If this is so, then why is Britain in the middle of so much fighting? Carson can only conclude that the best way to solve a discussion - through reasoned argument and debate - has been lost in the carnage. Once mankind has lost its ability to communicate, it loses its humanity alongside it; we have been reduced to animals, with no option but to use force to get what we want. This also locks us in a Catch-22 situation; without communication, we fall into the trap of war, but in the middle of a war, who has time or want to talk to the opposition? Carson takes this breaking of language literally; for example, his final line, “A fusillade of question-marks,” lacks a verb; he talks of “alleyways and sidestreets [being] blocked with stops and colons,” again showing that is the stopping of language that results in everyone being unable to escape the conflict between the opposing sides; and he notes also that the victim was “trying to complete a sentence in [his] head,” but it “kept stuttering.” In this last example, he also makes reference to a medical speech impediment, making it as though we are now biologically unable to talk, because the urge to resolve matters through violence has run so deep, it is now part of our DNA.
    Besides this, there are naturally many punctuation references, such as the “asterisk on the map” perfectly capturing the blotting-out and outward-flying idea of the explosion, as well as forming part of Carson’s cluster image. Carson also lists “nuts, bolts, nails, car-keys” in what is lying around the scene of destruction - just as these three items are small, yet hold together large, powerful structures and buildings, so too are words small things, yet they hold together a community - the fact that no-one is using them is clear, as here, the community of the British Isles is tearing itself apart.

  • #Differences between rebels and authorities Releventify This
    A final way in which Carson shows the conflict is in the difference between the two opposing groups. Carson amplifies the lack of communication between the two groups by showing that the riot squad, who are attempting to control everything, has numerous advantages over the rioters. Carson lists “A Saracen” (tank), “Kremlin-2 mesh” (armour), “Makrolon face-shields” and “Walkie-talkies” as items the riot squad posses, whereas the rioters have nothing but themselves, anything they may have brought with them, and their rage. This is just the sort of thing that is likely to have angered the rebels: seeing their enemies with official uniforms, using more advanced technology, and generally considering themselves “better people”, yet hypocritically restraining the rebels of their freedom to act upon what they believe in. A particularly noteworthy example of this is the walkie-talkies; as has been discussed, communication between both sides has broken down, and seeing their opposition communicating with each other to strengthen themselves, yet refusing to reason with them, will make the rebels’ boil. Through this, Carson again examplifies how language is being forgotten and destroyed in some places, and abused in other places, making it clear that such misuse is at the root of the fighting in the Troubles

  • #Other language techniques conveying the scene/message
    Carson also uses the simple idea of word choice in his poem alongside the main cluster metaphor, which help him display the conflict surrounding the victim in his poem using other images. There are a few notable examples of this.

    • The first example of this is found in the title, Belfast Confetti. Belfast, at the time this was written, was a place of deep confusion and fear, the centre of problems in the Troubles. Confetti, on the other hand, is generally used in celebration and happiness, creating juxtaposition between the two words. Combining this with the main event of the poem (the bomb/explosion), an ironic tone is set for the title, as we realise the confetti refers to the fragments of the explosion, contrasting with the happiness and joy it should bring.
    • Asterisk?
    • There is also the list on the third line, of “nuts, bolts, nails, car-keys” from the explosion. This simultaneously shows the destruction caused by the explosion (nuts, bolts and nails are tools used to join creations together; seeing them on their own means such things have been broken apart), yet by adding car-keys into the list, Carson adds a personal touch to it - the bomb is a national disaster, but it also impresses upon the lives of hundreds of individuals, who may have lost homes, possessions, or even friends or family in such an attack – this personal touch of human life makes the poem instantly more emotive.
    • Finally, we are told at the beginning of the second stanza that the victim “knows this labyrinth so well.” The word labyrinth suggests that prior to the bomb, the streets were a maze that took some getting used to, and that once he had mastered the labyrinth, the victim had a sense of power – he was on his home turf, and the area was his area. Now the bomb has been set off, however, all that has been taken away from him: the map has changed, his home could be gone, and his sense of power has evaporated, leaving him to blunder on blindly, forced to try to think straight in a scene of chaos, and use all his strength to merely survive.
      All of these clever touches subtly alter the mood of the poem, allowing Carson to allow the reader to even more vividly visualise the conflict and destruction surrounding the victim.
  • #Questions
    2) Choose a poem which describes an animal or a place or an event in an effective way.
    Briefly state what is being described and go on to show how the techniques used in the poem make the description effective.

    • What is being described, why it’s relevant, and techniques: word choice, cluster metaphor, structure, reverse-ness etc

    4) Choose a poem which describes a person’s experience.
    Explain how the poetic techniques used to describe the experience make the poem more interesting.

    • See above

    7) Choose a poem which describes a place or an incident.
    Briefly state where or what is being described, and go on to explain how the techniques used in the poem make the description memorable.

    • Same as Q 2)

    6) Choose a poem in which the poet creates a particular mood or atmosphere.
    Show how the poet creates this mood or atmosphere by his or her choice of subject matter and use of poetic techniques.

    • See above, but from angle of Carson’s emotions; fear, rage, confusion etc, and he makes us feel this as well.
    • Can also be combined w/Important Issue Q
  • #Intro
    Belfast Confetti is an emotive poem by Ciaran Carson that deals with the issue of conflict by looking at a bombing during the Troubles, a time of great fear and unrest for the people of Britain and Ireland. Through clever poetic techniques – particularly a powerfully relevant cluster image – Carson achieves his goal admirably.

  • #ReBOoT
    Belfast Confetti is set around someone who finds himself in a bombing in Ireland. The poem focuses on his attempt to escape, but his failing due to the chaos, confusion and violence around him. As he tries to escape, he takes in his surroundings, and Carson shows his thoughts in a way that reflects the chaos, as well as the issues around it. The poem is not resolved: the reader is left with unanswered questions surrounding them, and the bomb victim still trapped in the conflict.

  • #Structure
    With but a glance at the poem, the reader can tell that it is broken: broken into two stanzas, each stanza broken into four or five line pairs, and the lines in each pair being of longer then shorter length. One could disregard this as mere layout, but Carson goes one step further; he breaks his sentences where they are not supposed to be broken. A prime example can be found in the second and third pairs of lines, reading “…And the/explosion/itself- an…” By breaking up the sentence in so many places - across three lines, across two line pairs, that dash breaking up the sentence yet again and the conjunction “and” implying that the sentence should be joined to the previous one - Carson cleverly mimics the destruction encompassing the victim, as when surrounded by such broken language, we cannot help but imagine a broken scene before out eyes.
    #`Expand This Analysis?`

  • #Language Techniques
    Carson uses other techniques in his poem alongside these, which all help him display the conflict surrounding the victim in his poem. One of these is the simple idea of word choice, and there are a few notable examples of this.

    • The first example of this is found in the title, Belfast Confetti. Belfast, at the time this was written, was a place of deep confusion and fear, the centre of problems in the Troubles. Confetti, on the other hand, is generally used in celebration and happiness, creating juxtaposition between the two words. Combining this with the main event of the poem (the bomb/explosion), an ironic tone is set for the title, as we realise the confetti refers to the fragments of the explosion, contrasting with the happiness and joy it should mean.
    • Besides this, there are naturally many punctuation references, such as the “asterisk on the map” perfectly capturing the blotting-out and outward-flying idea of the explosion, as well as forming part of Carson’s cluster image.
    • There is also the list on the third line, of “nuts, bolts, nails, car-keys” from the explosion. This simultaneously shows the destruction caused by the explosion (nuts, bolts and nails are tools used to join creations together; seeing them on their own means such things have been broken apart), yet by adding car-keys into the list, Carson adds a personal touch to it - the bomb is a national disaster, but it also impresses upon the lives of hundreds of individuals, who may have lost homes, possessions, or even friends or family in such an attack – this personal touch of human life makes the poem instantly more emotive.
    • Finally, we are told at the beginning of the second stanza that the victim “knows this labyrinth so well.” The word labyrinth suggests that prior to the bomb, the streets were a maze that took some getting used to, and that once he had mastered the labyrinth, the victim had a sense of power – he was on his home turf, and the area was his area. Now the bomb has been set off, however, all that has been taken away from him: the map has changed, his home could be gone, and his sense of power has evaporated, leaving him to blunder on blindly, forced to try to think straight in a scene of chaos, and use all his strength to merely survive.
      All of these clever touches subtly alter the mood of the poem, allowing Carson to allow the reader to even more vividly visualise the conflict and destruction surrounding the victim.
  • #Difference between opponents
    A final way in which Carson shows the conflict is in the difference between the two opposing groups. Carson amplifies the lack of communication between the two groups by showing that the riot squad, who are attempting to control everything, has numerous advantages over the rioters. Carson lists “A Saracen” (tank), “Kremlin-2 mesh” (armour), “Makrolon face-shields” and “Walkie-talkies” as items the riot squad posses, whereas the rioters have nothing but themselves, anything they may have brought with them, and their rage. This is just the sort of thing that is likely to have angered the rebels: seeing their enemies with official uniforms, using more advanced technology, and generally considering themselves “better people”, yet hypocritically restraining the rebels of their freedom to act upon what they believe in. A particularly noteworthy example of this is the walkie-talkies; as has been discussed, communication between both sides has broken down, and seeing their opposition communicating with each other to strengthen themselves, yet refusing to reason with them, will make the rebels’ boil.

  • #Questions
    2) Choose a play in which there is an important relationship between two of the main characters.
    Describe the nature of the relationship, and explain how it is developed throughout the play.

    • afjna

      6) Choose a play which has developed your understanding of an important human emotion such as love, hatred, jealousy or any other emotion.
      Show how this understanding has been developed through the playwright’s use of dramatic techniques.

    • dalnf

    8) Choose a play which deals with an important human issue.
    State what the issue is and explain how one or more of the characters in the play deal with it. ???

    • lkfdd
  • #Plan
    Intro: - Techiques
    PCQE 1 – Hate
    PCQE 2 – Infatuation }
    PCQE 3 – Family love } false
    PCQE 4 – True Love

  • #Into
    The brilliant play Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare is an incredibly emotive drama, which, through the use of powerful contrasts, develops Shakespeare’s view & my understanding of the human emotion of love.

  • #Hatred
    From the offset of the play, Shakespeare makes it clear that hate and conflict are major presences with massive influences on the action. In the very first scene, a burning hatred between the two families – the Montagues and Capulets – is made painfully clear, through a fight breaking out, not even between the families to start with, but between their servants, before other members of the family join in too. However, the very embodiment and personification of hatred is Tybalt Capulet, whose hatred for the Montagues knows no bounds, as we see when he tells Benvolio:
    “Peace? I hate the word,
    As I hate Hell, all Montagues and thee”
    Shakespeare uses climax for effect here, and we see that Hell, the most feared and hated place in existence, is a mere third in Tybalt’s list of hatreds. With this being the climate that Romeo and Juliet have grown up in, it is a miracle they are able to love at all, let alone the people they are supposed to hate the most.

  • #Superficial Family Love
    If any love would be assumed to be a bond unbreakable, the parent-and-child love or family love should certainly be a contender – yet Shakespeare elects to show us that this love is, here, in fact false. We see that when everything is fine and simple, Juliet’s parents’ love for their only child comes easy; she is “the hopeful lady of [her father’s] Earth”, after all. But the moment she opposes them, by refusing to marry Paris, this illusion shatters completely, and her parents suddenly consider “this one [Juliet] too much, and that we have a curse in having her.” Through this, Shakespeare shows us that true love is not something that comes easily, and reinforces the hostile environment the lovers are growing up in.

  • #False Infatuation
    Shakespeare also look at false love through Romeo; this time, by his infatuation with Rosaline. As opposed to the joy, peace and happiness true love brings, we see that Romeo’s “love” is a dark one, causing him pain and suffering. Confusing images swamp Romeo’s feelings for her, as Shakespeare riddles Romeo’s speech about her with oxymorons and dark imagery, as he talks of “heavy lightness, serious vanity, misshapen chaos of well-seeming forms!” Through heavy oxymoron and antithesis use, Shakespeare shows us that infatuation and false love bring only confusion and sadness. This only makes the great turnaround, where Romeo meets and falls for Juliet, even more spectacular, and their love even more perfect and beautiful.

  • #Comparative Difference - True Love
    Finally, having shown us many antitheses to true love – hate, superficial family love and false, painful infatuation – Shakespeare reveals true love to us, and amplifies it his beliefs about it by making it the antithesis to the above emotions. Its opposition to hatred is clear, and backed up by Juliet’s unhesitant willingness to “no longer be a Capulet,” forgoing her hatred for the other Montagues in order to be able to love Romeo; in the same line, she shows that she knows this love is worth more than her family’s and is willing to give even that up for Romeo. We also see the turnaround for Romeo; his lover no longer causes him to endure “feather[s] of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health” but rather she “doth teach torches to burn bright”, being “like a jewel in an Ethiop’s ear” – a remarkable turnaround from the dark to light imagery, and also showing his willingness to love his “jewel” even when she belongs to a family which he hates (the “Ethiop[ian]’s ear”). Throughout this wonderful revelation, we see Shakespeare developing our understanding of love, of its trueness, ability to calm hatred, power, and the joy and happiness it brings.

  • #Conclusion
    Overall, Shakespeare has used fantastically the technique of contrast –specifically, through oxymoron and antithesis – to show to us the power that true love has, in his most famous romantic tragedy Romeo and Juliet.

  • #Necessary Quotations

  • #Questions
    5) Choose a play in which a main character’s actions have a significant effect on the rest of the play.
    Show how this character’s actions have affected the other characters and/or the outcome of the play.

    • fnakfj

    9) Choose a play in which there is a scene which could be described as a turning point in the fate of one or more of the characters.
    Show how this scene could be described as a turning point and explain how it increased your understanding of the character or the characters in the rest of the play.

    • alfn

    4) Choose a play in which there is conflict between two characters in a family or a group.
    Show how the conflict occurs and explain how it affects the characters and the events of the play

    • Conflict is between Tybalt and the Monts; kills M, TP happens

    1) Choose a play in which there is a character who suffers from a human weakness such as ambition, selfishness, lack of self-knowledge, jealousy, pride, lust . . .
    Show how the weakness is revealed, then explain how this weakness affects both the characters and the events of the play.

    • Romeo succumbs to his reckless passion when M is killed; TP happens
  • #Plan:

    1. TP – M and T, change in R, foreshadow
    2. Lead-up – covers hate w/R&J’s love
    3. Result - seperation
    4. Effect on Fate etc
  • #Intro
    The emotive play Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare is one of his most famous works, in which he successfully employs use of a turning point both in the action and in Romeo’s character to more emotively convey the tragedy surrounding the lovers’ deaths.

  • #T.P.
    The turning point of the play comes around directly as a result of a change in Romeo’s character, when his emotions of love are overturned. The previous acts of the play have laid out the hatred between the two families painfully clearly, before building up Romeo and Juliet’s love over this conflict, making it appear all the more pure and perfect through comparative difference – indeed, Juliet’s “love hath made [Romeo] effeminate,” as Romeo himself concedes. However, in Act 3:1, yet another conflict arises, and in the midst of protecting Romeo, Mercutio (his best friend) is murdered by Tybalt, Juliet’s cousin. In the heat of the moment, the thin ice of love Romeo has been dancing on shatters, and he plunges back into his old ways of hatred, “fire-ey’d fury [being his] conduct now!” In one evil act of conflict by Tybalt, Romeo’s love is overpowered with hatred, and Romeo reacts to that hatred, in his fury avenging Mercutio by murdering Tybalt. With such a blemish upon both his love and his name, we see the tide of the story turn: the lovers’ love is questioned; Romeo must flee Verona, lest he be executed; and the story turns towards the fatal path predicted in the Prologue, heralded by Mercutio’s final cry of “a plague o’both your houses,” foreshadowing the curse that will indeed fall upon both families when the lovers take their own lives.

  • #Build-Up
    A turning point must have a path to turn away from: in this case, Romeo turns away from the love he has for Juliet, which Shakespeare has carefully built up over the conflict between their two families. The hatred between them has been made clear from the very first scene of the play, where not even the families, but the servants, of the opposing houses start a quarrel, in which the families soon join and the upheaval quickly descends into a brawl. That even their servants meeting should bring disquiet shows how deeply ingrained the conflict is: however, it is Tybalt, the personification of hate, that marks clearest the hatred between them, as he tells Benvolio:
    “…peace? I hate the word,
    As I hate Hell, all Montagues and thee.”
    Shakespeare uses climax for effect here, and we see that Hell, the most feared and hated place in existence, comes a mere third in the things Tybalt hates, behind his all-consuming hatred for the Montagues and, at that moment, Benvolio.
    However, even against this backdrop, Shakespeare shows that true love can still blossom, through the love of Romeo and Juliet. Shakespeare shows us that though her family is like “an Ethiop’s ear” in their darkness and the hatred they have for him, Romeo can still find it in his heart to love his “rich jewel” in Juliet, as her beauty and preciousness (as shown by the image of a jewel) is more than worth giving up his hate However, even against this backdrop, Shakespeare shows that true love can still blossom, through the love of Romeo and Juliet. Shakespeare shows us that though her family is like “an Ethiop’s ear” in their darkness and the hatred they have for him, Romeo can still find it in his heart to love his “rich jewel” in Juliet, as her beauty and preciousness (as shown by the image of a jewel) is more than worth giving up his hate for her family. Similarly, Juliet is willing to “no longer be a Capulet,” renouncing her name – in those days, a great proportion of what defined you – in return for love, if that is what is how much she must sacrifice. Through comparative difference, Shakespeare displays their love in the most pure and perfect way, showing that true love can triumph over hatred – but also making it that much more tragic when Romeo lets hatred overpower him, dramatising the turning point even further.

  • #Effects of TP
    The effects of the turning point devastate the lovers: now a murderer, Romeo is forced to flee from Verona for his life; but to keep his physical life, he must lose his life with Juliet. The torment and confusion this causes her is displayed through heavy oxymoron use; she fears she has married a “serpent heart, hid with flowering face” or “dragon [that] keep[s] so fair a cave” in Romeo; terrified she has fallen in love with someone who does not love her back, and seeks only to bring chaos and destruction. Meanwhile, Romeo laments that:
    “…every cat and dog
    And little mouse, every unworthy thing,
    Live here in heaven, and may look on [Juliet],
    But Romeo may not”
    The separation the turning point brings shows the turn things have taken for the worst, and gives a glimpse of the heart-wrenching pain of loss that will eventually lead them both to take their own lives.

  • #Wrap-Up: Effects on Fate/Free Will
    The turning point of the play gives insight into the powers working throughout it: specifically, that of fate working against free will. It is interesting to note that, while each character exercises their will freely, and victories in battles for love or hate suggest a breaking away from the predestined, at no point are they ever put off course for their final fate set out for them in the Prologue, where:
    “A pair of star-cross’d lovers take their life,
    … Doth with their death bury their parent’s strife.”
    Romeo meets the love of his life, and they choose to marry each other, apparently a victory for love; but to reach Juliet, he must break into the Capulet’s party, sparking Tybalt’s fury and paving the path for the turning point scene. Tybalt is killed, destroying hate’s personification; yet this results in Romeo’s banishment. Yet, even this is not a clear-cut victory: Romeo’s banishment, eventually leading to his and Juliet’s death, evidently a victory for hate, in fact results in the union for the two previously opposing families, and hate has destroyed itself. The turning point is a clear exemplar that the characters, no matter what they do, are resigned to the fate written out for them in the Prologue, and fate will always bend every character’s actions towards its own goal.

  • #Conclusion
    Overall, Shakespeare has used a turning point very effectively in his emotive play Romeo and Juliet, in order to better convey the tragedy surrounding the couple and explore the themes of love, hate and fate.

  • #Necessary Quotations

  • #Questions
    3) Choose a play which you feel has a dramatic final scene.
    Describe briefly what happens and explain how effective the ending is in bringing to a conclusion the central concerns of the text characterisation, key scene(s), structure, climax, theme, plot, conflict, setting . . .

    • f n

    8) Choose a play which has tragic ending - Show how the ending of the play results from the strengths and/or weaknesses of the main character(s)

    • aj
  • #Beta Plan - Similar to TP

    • Intro
    • What the tragic ending is
    • What lead up to the tragic ending
    • The effect of the tragic ending + it’s wrapping up of the plot/concerns
    • The reference to fate/free will paragraph (TP)
  • #The Ending

  • #The lead-up (eg TP)

  • #Effect of Ending

  • #Wrap-Up: Effects on Fate/Free Will
    The turning point of the play gives insight into the powers working throughout it: specifically, that of fate working against free will. It is interesting to note that, while each character exercises their will freely, and victories in battles for love or hate suggest a breaking away from the predestined, at no point are they ever put off course for their final fate set out for them in the Prologue, where:
    “A pair of star-cross’d lovers take their life,
    … Doth with their death bury their parent’s strife.”
    Romeo meets the love of his life, and they choose to marry each other, apparently a victory for love; but to reach Juliet, he must break into the Capulet’s party, sparking Tybalt’s fury and paving the path for the turning point scene. Tybalt is killed, destroying hate’s personification; yet this results in Romeo’s banishment. Yet, even this is not a clear-cut victory: Romeo’s banishment, eventually leading to his and Juliet’s death, evidently a victory for hate, in fact results in the union for the two previously opposing families, and hate has destroyed itself. The turning point is a clear exemplar that the characters, no matter what they do, are resigned to the fate written out for them in the Prologue, and fate will always bend every character’s actions towards its own goal.
    #`Releventify`

  • #Necessary Quotations

    {"cards":[{"_id":"40ac168735833d481e00001b","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":null,"content":"#School Stuffs"},{"_id":"40ac17b135833d481e00001c","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":"40ac168735833d481e00001b","content":"#English"},{"_id":"41064bdeb7307fb64e000120","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":"40ac17b135833d481e00001c","content":"#Set Text - Cone Gatherers"},{"_id":"41064c48b7307fb64e000121","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":"41064bdeb7307fb64e000120","content":"#Sacrifice"},{"_id":"410699fdb7307fb64e000129","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":"41064c48b7307fb64e000121","content":"#Deer Hunt Scene\n - Idea of Calum sacrificing his safety for the dear's life\n - Shows that Calum (who represents innocent, pre-fall man) is one with nature\n - Willing to sacrifice himself for it.\n - Also, he did not wish to participate in the deer hunt in the first place"},{"_id":"41069aa2b7307fb64e00012a","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":2,"parentId":"41064c48b7307fb64e000121","content":"#Beach Hut Scene"},{"_id":"41069b7ab7307fb64e00012b","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":3,"parentId":"41064c48b7307fb64e000121","content":"#Calum's Death Scene"},{"_id":"41069bf3b7307fb64e00012c","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":4,"parentId":"41064c48b7307fb64e000121","content":"#Dear Drive Scene\n - Aristocracy sacrifice nature for their own intents and purposes\n - Calum contrasts with the aristocracy, who sacrifice nature for their own purposes.\n - They see it as below them, so"},{"_id":"418d53c83da07ff503000074","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":5,"parentId":"41064c48b7307fb64e000121","content":"#`She spoke with a sense of sacrifice (Calum's death)`"},{"_id":"410693aeb7307fb64e000124","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":2,"parentId":"41064bdeb7307fb64e000120","content":"#Nature"},{"_id":"410779b1b7307fb64e00013c","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":"410693aeb7307fb64e000124","content":"#Deer Drive Scene\n - Idea of the aristocracy controlling nature\n - Calum, out of love for nature and the deer, tries to stop everyone from killing it; Duror ensures this fails\n - LRC blames Calum entirely for the Drive becoming a fiasco, despite him being forced to come against his will, *due to* LRC herself\n - An example that the aristocracy not only see nature as theirs to do what they like with, but also that they can simply dismiss the opinions of those lower than them, taking control regardless of morals\n - They see themselves as ruling over nature, and do not think of the consequences of harming it"},{"_id":"410779dfb7307fb64e00013d","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":2,"parentId":"410693aeb7307fb64e000124","content":"#Beach Hut\n - Idea of the aristocracy controlling nature"},{"_id":"41077a33b7307fb64e00013e","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":3,"parentId":"410693aeb7307fb64e000124","content":"#Calum's Death\n - Idea of aristocracy losing control over nature (?)"},{"_id":"4107a032b7307fb64e000143","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":4,"parentId":"410693aeb7307fb64e000124","content":"#Other Relevant Scene"},{"_id":"41069404b7307fb64e000125","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":3,"parentId":"41064bdeb7307fb64e000120","content":"#War"},{"_id":"41077baeb7307fb64e000140","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":2,"parentId":"41069404b7307fb64e000125","content":"#Deer Drive Scene (UNFINISHED)\n - Idea of war between Calum and Duror\n - Duror has the chance to send the Cone-Gatherers away, but does not take it\n - He cannot allow them to go and be happy; that it not the revenge he needs\n - Even his death alone is not enough, for \"his going must be a destruction, an agony, a crucifixion\"\n - Idea that death is not a big deal to the lower classes, and in order to truly wreak revenge on him, a worse punishment must be empolyed "},{"_id":"4107a132b7307fb64e000144","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":3,"parentId":"41069404b7307fb64e000125","content":"#Beach Hut Scene"},{"_id":"4107a1a7b7307fb64e000146","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":3.5,"parentId":"41069404b7307fb64e000125","content":"#Calum's Death Scene"},{"_id":"4107a1a7b7307fb64e000145","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":4,"parentId":"41069404b7307fb64e000125","content":"#Other Relevant Scene"},{"_id":"41069436b7307fb64e000126","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":4,"parentId":"41064bdeb7307fb64e000120","content":"#Death"},{"_id":"4106fbf2b7307fb64e000135","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":0.5,"parentId":"41069436b7307fb64e000126","content":"#Post-Deer Hut Scene\n - One's death being another's gain / Peggy's life is a burden/inconvenience\n - Previous to the death scene, Duror has a dream where Peggy dies\n - He suddenly wonders if the dream is true (\"was Peggy really dead?\"; he becomes lighthearted and happy (\"Suddenly it was as if the burden of misery had been lifted from him\")\n - This shows again that for Duror, it would be better for Peggy to die; rather than see her as a living being, her life is a burden to him, and her death a relief, rather than a tragedy of the loss of a human life\n - Shows that Duror hates his life so much, due to his ties to Peggy, that her death is a willing price to pay for his freedom - she is reduced to a burden, and her life an exchangeable property"},{"_id":"4106a2aab7307fb64e00012d","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":"41069436b7307fb64e000126","content":"#Deer Hunt Scene\n - Idea of death not being pain enough\n - Duror has the chance to send the Cone-Gatherers away, but does not take it\n - He cannot allow them to go and be happy; that it not the revenge he needs\n - Even his death alone is not enough, for \"his going must be a destruction, an agony, a crucifixion\"\n - Idea that death is not a big deal to the lower classes, and in order to truly wreak revenge on him, a worse punishment must be empolyed "},{"_id":"4106b101b7307fb64e000134","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":2,"parentId":"41069436b7307fb64e000126","content":"#Beach Hut Scene\n - Idea of the risk of death is little compared to that of Lady Runcie-Campbell's comfort\n - Brothers break into the hut, in order to save themselves from the storm, especially considering that Neil has \"rheumatics, and [Calum's] chest is weak\"\n - However, upon discovering them, Lady Runcie-Campbell demands they leave - only to then take advantage of the fire they lit\n - Shows that the aristocracy considers the lower classes as servants for their bidding, and they should not have to worry about their wellbeing - the former's comfort is more important than the latter's life\n - \"Risking death is but a forfeit for being in a lower class, and risk of death is a inconvenience for others, rather than a terrible tragedy/loss of life\""},{"_id":"41075307b7307fb64e000137","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":3,"parentId":"41069436b7307fb64e000126","content":"#Calum's Death Scene\n - Idea of Calum's death being an inconvenience for LRC\n - LRC \"prayed that Duror... had not hurt the cone-gatherers, not for their sakes... but for her son's\"\n - Again, the death of a lower-class member is not seen from their point of view, with the loss of a life, but rather as the loss of a utility, to rescue her son.\n - Calum's death is a problem for her, not them\n - Humans are degraded to their uses, the lower class to what they can do for the upper, and death to an inconveniance"},{"_id":"4106945eb7307fb64e000127","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":5,"parentId":"41064bdeb7307fb64e000120","content":"#Good & Evil"},{"_id":"4107a2c9b7307fb64e000147","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":"4106945eb7307fb64e000127","content":"#Deer Hunt Scene `COPYPASTED, MUST RELEVENTIFY)`\n - Idea of death not being pain enough\n - Duror has the chance to send the Cone-Gatherers away, but does not take it\n - He cannot allow them to go and be happy; that it not the revenge he needs\n - Even his death alone is not enough, for \"his going must be a destruction, an agony, a crucifixion\"\n - Idea that death is not a big deal to the lower classes, and in order to truly wreak revenge on him, a worse punishment must be empolyed "},{"_id":"4107a323b7307fb64e000148","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":2,"parentId":"4106945eb7307fb64e000127","content":"#Beach Hut Scene `COPYPASTED, MUST RELEVENTIFY`\n - Idea of the risk of death is little compared to that of Lady Runcie-Campbell's comfort\n - Brothers break into the hut, in order to save themselves from the storm, especially considering that Neil has \"rheumatics, and [Calum's] chest is weak\"\n - However, upon discovering them, Lady Runcie-Campbell demands they leave - only to then take advantage of the fire they lit\n - Shows that the aristocracy considers the lower classes as servants for their bidding, and they should not \nhave to worry about their wellbeing - the former's comfort is more important than the latter's life\n` - \"Risking death is but a forfeit for being in a lower class, and risk of death is a inconvenience for others, rather than a terrible tragedy/loss of life\"`"},{"_id":"4107a375b7307fb64e000149","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":3,"parentId":"4106945eb7307fb64e000127","content":"#Calum's Death Scene"},{"_id":"4107a600b7307fb64e00014a","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":4,"parentId":"4106945eb7307fb64e000127","content":"#Other Relevant Scene"},{"_id":"4106978eb7307fb64e000128","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":6,"parentId":"41064bdeb7307fb64e000120","content":"#Social Class"},{"_id":"41077118b7307fb64e00013b","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":0.25,"parentId":"4106978eb7307fb64e000128","content":"#Deer Drive Scene\n - Idea of Calum's human rights (to his views) being disregarded\n - Calum, out of love for nature and the deer, tries to stop everyone from killing it; Duror ensures this fails\n - LRC blames Calum entirely for the Drive becoming a fiasco, despite him being forced to come against his will, *due to* LRC herself\n - An example that the aristocracy not only see nature as theirs to do what they like with, but also that they can simply dismiss the opinions of those lower than them, taking control regardless of morals"},{"_id":"4107710db7307fb64e00013a","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":0.5,"parentId":"4106978eb7307fb64e000128","content":"`#Deer Drive Scene`\n `- Idea of the aristocracy controlling nature`"},{"_id":"41076fd0b7307fb64e000138","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":"4106978eb7307fb64e000128","content":"#Beach Hut Scene\n - Idea of the risk of death is little compared to that of Lady Runcie-Campbell's comfort\n - Brothers break into the hut, in order to save themselves from the storm, especially considering that Neil has \"rheumatics, and [Calum's] chest is weak\"\n - However, upon discovering them, Lady Runcie-Campbell demands they leave - only to then take advantage of the fire they lit\n - Shows that the aristocracy considers the lower classes as servants for their bidding, and they should not have to worry about their wellbeing - the former's comfort is more important than the latter's life\n` - \"Risking death is but a forfeit for being in a lower class, and risk of death is a inconvenience for others, rather than a terrible tragedy/loss of life\"`"},{"_id":"41077035b7307fb64e000139","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":2,"parentId":"4106978eb7307fb64e000128","content":"#Calum's Death Scene\n - Idea of Calum's death being an inconvenience for LRC\n - LRC \"prayed that Duror... had not hurt the cone-gatherers, not for their sakes... but for her son's\"\n - Again, the death of a lower-class member is not seen from their point of view, with the loss of a life, but rather as the loss of a utility, to rescue her son.\n - Calum's death is a problem for her, not them\n - Humans are degraded to their uses, the lower class to what they can do for the upper, and death to an inconveniance"},{"_id":"41064ce9b7307fb64e000122","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":2,"parentId":"40ac17b135833d481e00001c","content":"#Critical Essays - Belfast Confetti"},{"_id":"417e17673da07ff503000039","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":2,"parentId":"41064ce9b7307fb64e000122","content":"#Paragraphs"},{"_id":"417e337b3da07ff50300003b","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":"417e17673da07ff503000039","content":"With but a glance, the reader sees the poem is broken: broken into two stanzas, each stanza broken into pairs or lines, and the lines in each pair being of longer then shorter length. One could disregard this as mere layout, but Carson goes one step further; he breaks his sentences where they are not supposed to be broken. A prime example can be found in the second and third pairs of lines, reading:\n \"…And the\n explosion\n itself- an…”\nBy breaking up the sentence in so many places - across three lines, two line pairs, the dash breaking the sentence yet again and the conjunction “and” indicating that it should be joined to the previous sentence – Carson makes clear the point he is trying to make; this exploding bomb is a result of language and communication exploding, leaving it as unusable fragments, as when communication cannot be used to resolve a situation, violence is all that remains, as clearly was the case during the Troubles"},{"_id":"417e42903da07ff50300003c","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":2,"parentId":"417e17673da07ff503000039","content":"Carson goes on to describe the scene around him, using his language as a cluster metaphor.\n - He tells us that the scene around him s \"a fount of broken type\" - just as broken words and jumbled letters are the useless and meaningless remains of once-powerful/authoritative words, so too have the once powerful buildings been reduced to pathetic, helpless rubble.\n - \"An asterisk on the map\" also perfectly captures the blotting-out and outward-moving effects of the bomb; it also notes it as a key incident, as asterisks are used for notes and references.\n - The title uses juxtaposition; \"Belfast\", a word with negative connotations due to implications of political unrest and upheaval, is put beside \"confetti\", an item used most commonly at joyous occasions, such as weddings. This juxtaposition again displays the confusion of what is happening, as no-one knows who is right or wrong, or even what right and wrong even are.\n\nThis shows how XYZ"},{"_id":"417ee0f13da07ff50300003d","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":3,"parentId":"417e17673da07ff503000039","content":"However, Carson also reverses this, and uses the scene around him to mimic what is happening to communication.\n - Referring again to \"a fount of broken type\", we see that just as the buildings have been reduced to useless, helpless rubble, with every violent act that occurs during the Troubles, communication and the use and meaning of words is also, slowly but surely, bit by bit, being blown apart.\n - Just as \"Nuts, bolts, nails\" are small things that hold massive structures together, so too do small words hold together the infrastructure of a community - yet, both of these are lying about uselessly, having been destroyed by violence such as this bomb.\n - Carson's escape is \"blocked with stops and colons\" - the stopping (\"stops\") and delaying (\"colons\") of communication is preventing anyone's escape from the trap of violence, even though discussing a way out of the problem will very quickly resolve it."},{"_id":"418c95e63da07ff503000056","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":3,"parentId":"41064ce9b7307fb64e000122","content":"#Important Issue Essay"},{"_id":"418c9f373da07ff503000057","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":"418c95e63da07ff503000056","content":"#Questions\n1) Choose a poem which deals with an important issue such as war, crime, poverty or racism.\nExplain how the poet deepens your understanding of the issue by the choice of content and the skillful use of poetic techniques.\n - Simply right the bog-standard WXYZ structure conflict etc etc essay\n\n5) Choose a poem which arouses strong emotion in you.\nDescribe how you feel about the poem, and explain how the poet leads you to feel this way. \n - Write above essay, but from angle of \"the breakdown of language obviously enrages and hurts Carson, and he conveys this hurt and anger well to us, so that I also feel the emotion\"\n\n6) Choose a poem in which the poet creates a particular mood or atmosphere. \nShow how the poet creates this mood or atmosphere by his or her choice of subject matter and use of poetic techniques.\n - Above essay, but emphasis on the emotions Carson feels - anger, fear, and the scene makes him and us feel all that\n - Can also be combined w/Description Q"},{"_id":"418ce5943da07ff503000063","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":2,"parentId":"418c95e63da07ff503000056","content":"#Plan\nPCQE 1 - Structure/Layout mimics language breakdown\nPCQE 2 - Cluster Metaphor - Scene (description) mimics language breakdown\nPCQE 3 - Unfairness of fight - Authorities have communication\nPCQE 4 - General - Juxtaposition, backwards poem, etc etc all mimics language breakdown"},{"_id":"418ce5cf3da07ff503000064","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":3,"parentId":"418c95e63da07ff503000056","content":"#Intro\n*Belfast Confetti* by Ciaron Carson is an emotive poem about a terrorist bombing dureing the Troubles, with effectively uses many techniques - in particular, a *cluster metaphor* of *language* - to convey important issues in his poem, including his most important message: that the source of all this violence is the *breakdown of language and communication*."},{"_id":"418ce6093da07ff503000065","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":4,"parentId":"418c95e63da07ff503000056","content":"#Structure/Layout\nWith but a glance at the poem, the reader can immediately tell that it is *broken*: broken into two stanzas, each stanza broken into four or five line pairs, and the lines in each pair having a line of longer then shorter length. One could disregard this as mere layout, but Carson goes one further; he breaks his sentences where they are not supposed to be broken. A prime example can be found in the second and third pairs of lines, reading “…And the/explosion/itself- an…” By breaking up the sentence in so many places - across three lines, across two line pairs, that dash breaking up the sentence yet again and the conjunction “and” implying that the sentence should be joined to the previous one - Carson cleverly mimics both the physical destruction and the destruction of language encompassing the victim, as when surrounded by such a broken poem, we cannot help but visualise the brokenness of communication that is going on, and it is no surprise to us that such violence should break out."},{"_id":"418ce6693da07ff503000066","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":5,"parentId":"418c95e63da07ff503000056","content":"#Scene mimics what is happening to language\nHowever, Carson uses another tactic to make his mark about the Troubles in another, deeper way: the use of a *language cluster metaphor*. In any argument, there will always be opposing views, and violence is always the worst way to work out which of these views are correct. If this is so, then why is Britain in the middle of so much fighting? Carson can only conclude that the best way to solve a discussion - through reasoned argument and debate - has been lost in the carnage. Once mankind has lost its ability to communicate, it loses its humanity alongside it; we have been reduced to animals, with no option but to use force to get what we want. This also locks us in a Catch-22 situation; without communication, we fall into the trap of war, but in the middle of a war, who has time or want to talk to the opposition? Carson takes this breaking of language literally; for example, his final line, \"A fusillade of question-marks,\" lacks a verb; he talks of \"alleyways and sidestreets [being] blocked with stops and colons,\" again showing that is the stopping of language that results in everyone being unable to escape the conflict between the opposing sides; and he notes also that the victim was \"trying to complete a sentence in [his] head,\" but it \"kept stuttering.\" In this last example, he also makes reference to a medical speech impediment, making it as though we are now biologically unable to talk, because the urge to resolve matters through violence has run so deep, it is now part of our DNA.\nBesides this, there are naturally many punctuation references, such as the “asterisk on the map” perfectly capturing the blotting-out and outward-flying idea of the explosion, as well as forming part of Carson’s cluster image. Carson also lists \"nuts, bolts, nails, car-keys\" in what is lying around the scene of destruction - just as these three items are small, yet hold together large, powerful structures and buildings, so too are words small things, yet they hold together a community - the fact that no-one is using them is clear, as here, the community of the British Isles is tearing itself apart.\n"},{"_id":"418ce7323da07ff503000067","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":6,"parentId":"418c95e63da07ff503000056","content":"#Differences between rebels and authorities `Releventify This`\nA final way in which Carson shows the conflict is in the difference between the two opposing groups. Carson amplifies the lack of communication between the two groups by showing that the riot squad, who are attempting to control everything, has numerous advantages over the rioters. Carson lists “A Saracen” (tank), “Kremlin-2 mesh” (armour), “Makrolon face-shields” and “Walkie-talkies” as items the riot squad posses, whereas the rioters have nothing but themselves, anything they may have brought with them, and their rage. This is just the sort of thing that is likely to have angered the rebels: seeing their enemies with official uniforms, using more advanced technology, and generally considering themselves “better people”, yet hypocritically restraining the rebels of their freedom to act upon what they believe in. A particularly noteworthy example of this is the walkie-talkies; as has been discussed, communication between both sides has broken down, and seeing their opposition communicating with each other to strengthen themselves, yet refusing to reason with them, will make the rebels’ boil. Through this, Carson again examplifies how language is being forgotten and destroyed in some places, and abused in other places, making it clear that such misuse is at the root of the fighting in the Troubles"},{"_id":"4194eac9430a54a13b000070","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":7,"parentId":"418c95e63da07ff503000056","content":"#Other language techniques conveying the scene/message\nCarson also uses the simple idea of word choice in his poem alongside the main cluster metaphor, which help him display the conflict surrounding the victim in his poem using other images. There are a few notable examples of this.\n - The first example of this is found in the title, Belfast Confetti. Belfast, at the time this was written, was a place of deep confusion and fear, the centre of problems in the Troubles. Confetti, on the other hand, is generally used in celebration and happiness, creating juxtaposition between the two words. Combining this with the main event of the poem (the bomb/explosion), an ironic tone is set for the title, as we realise the confetti refers to the fragments of the explosion, contrasting with the happiness and joy it should bring.\n - `Asterisk?`\n - There is also the list on the third line, of “nuts, bolts, nails, car-keys” from the explosion. This simultaneously shows the destruction caused by the explosion (nuts, bolts and nails are tools used to join creations together; seeing them on their own means such things have been broken apart), yet by adding car-keys into the list, Carson adds a personal touch to it - the bomb is a national disaster, but it also impresses upon the lives of hundreds of individuals, who may have lost homes, possessions, or even friends or family in such an attack – this personal touch of human life makes the poem instantly more emotive.\n - Finally, we are told at the beginning of the second stanza that the victim “knows this labyrinth so well.” The word labyrinth suggests that prior to the bomb, the streets were a maze that took some getting used to, and that once he had mastered the labyrinth, the victim had a sense of power – he was on his home turf, and the area was *his* area. Now the bomb has been set off, however, all that has been taken away from him: the map has changed, his home could be gone, and his sense of power has evaporated, leaving him to blunder on blindly, forced to try to think straight in a scene of chaos, and use all his strength to merely survive.\nAll of these clever touches subtly alter the mood of the poem, allowing Carson to allow the reader to even more vividly visualise the conflict and destruction surrounding the victim."},{"_id":"4194ebd6430a54a13b000071","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":8,"parentId":"418c95e63da07ff503000056","content":"#Conclusion"},{"_id":"4194ec16430a54a13b000072","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":9,"parentId":"418c95e63da07ff503000056","content":"#Quotations"},{"_id":"418ca0a83da07ff503000058","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":4,"parentId":"41064ce9b7307fb64e000122","content":"#Description Essay\n#`relevent-ify this to Descriptiv PoV`"},{"_id":"418ca1623da07ff503000059","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":"418ca0a83da07ff503000058","content":"#Questions\n2) Choose a poem which describes an animal or a place or an event in an effective way.\nBriefly state what is being described and go on to show how the techniques used in the poem make the description effective.\n - What is being described, why it's relevant, and techniques: word choice, cluster metaphor, structure, reverse-ness etc\n\n4) Choose a poem which describes a person’s experience.\nExplain how the poetic techniques used to describe the experience make the poem more interesting. \n - See above\n\n7) Choose a poem which describes a place or an incident.\n Briefly state where or what is being described, and go on to explain how the techniques used in the poem make the description memorable. \n - Same as Q 2)\n\n6) Choose a poem in which the poet creates a particular mood or atmosphere. \nShow how the poet creates this mood or atmosphere by his or her choice of subject matter and use of poetic techniques.\n - See above, but from angle of Carson's emotions; fear, rage, confusion etc, and he makes us feel this as well.\n - Can also be combined w/Important Issue Q"},{"_id":"418cd4d63da07ff503000060","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":1.5,"parentId":"418ca0a83da07ff503000058","content":"#Intro\nBelfast Confetti is an emotive poem by Ciaran Carson that deals with the issue of conflict by looking at a bombing during the Troubles, a time of great fear and unrest for the people of Britain and Ireland. Through clever poetic techniques – particularly a powerfully relevant cluster image – Carson achieves his goal admirably."},{"_id":"418cd5793da07ff503000061","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":1.75,"parentId":"418ca0a83da07ff503000058","content":"#ReBOoT\nBelfast Confetti is set around someone who finds himself in a bombing in Ireland. The poem focuses on his attempt to escape, but his failing due to the chaos, confusion and violence around him. As he tries to escape, he takes in his surroundings, and Carson shows his thoughts in a way that reflects the chaos, as well as the issues around it. The poem is not resolved: the reader is left with unanswered questions surrounding them, and the bomb victim still trapped in the conflict."},{"_id":"418cd7ba3da07ff503000062","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":1.875,"parentId":"418ca0a83da07ff503000058","content":"#Structure\nWith but a glance at the poem, the reader can tell that it is broken: broken into two stanzas, each stanza broken into four or five line pairs, and the lines in each pair being of longer then shorter length. One could disregard this as mere layout, but Carson goes one step further; he breaks his sentences where they are not supposed to be broken. A prime example can be found in the second and third pairs of lines, reading “…And the/explosion/itself- an…” By breaking up the sentence in so many places - across three lines, across two line pairs, that dash breaking up the sentence yet again and the conjunction “and” implying that the sentence should be joined to the previous one - Carson cleverly mimics the destruction encompassing the victim, as when surrounded by such broken language, we cannot help but imagine a broken scene before out eyes.\n#`Expand This Analysis?`"},{"_id":"418cc8f43da07ff50300005e","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":2,"parentId":"418ca0a83da07ff503000058","content":"#Language Techniques\nCarson uses other techniques in his poem alongside these, which all help him display the conflict surrounding the victim in his poem. One of these is the simple idea of word choice, and there are a few notable examples of this.\n - The first example of this is found in the title, Belfast Confetti. Belfast, at the time this was written, was a place of deep confusion and fear, the centre of problems in the Troubles. Confetti, on the other hand, is generally used in celebration and happiness, creating juxtaposition between the two words. Combining this with the main event of the poem (the bomb/explosion), an ironic tone is set for the title, as we realise the confetti refers to the fragments of the explosion, contrasting with the happiness and joy it should mean.\n - Besides this, there are naturally many punctuation references, such as the “asterisk on the map” perfectly capturing the blotting-out and outward-flying idea of the explosion, as well as forming part of Carson’s cluster image.\n - There is also the list on the third line, of “nuts, bolts, nails, car-keys” from the explosion. This simultaneously shows the destruction caused by the explosion (nuts, bolts and nails are tools used to join creations together; seeing them on their own means such things have been broken apart), yet by adding car-keys into the list, Carson adds a personal touch to it - the bomb is a national disaster, but it also impresses upon the lives of hundreds of individuals, who may have lost homes, possessions, or even friends or family in such an attack – this personal touch of human life makes the poem instantly more emotive.\n - Finally, we are told at the beginning of the second stanza that the victim “knows this labyrinth so well.” The word labyrinth suggests that prior to the bomb, the streets were a maze that took some getting used to, and that once he had mastered the labyrinth, the victim had a sense of power – he was on his home turf, and the area was his area. Now the bomb has been set off, however, all that has been taken away from him: the map has changed, his home could be gone, and his sense of power has evaporated, leaving him to blunder on blindly, forced to try to think straight in a scene of chaos, and use all his strength to merely survive.\nAll of these clever touches subtly alter the mood of the poem, allowing Carson to allow the reader to even more vividly visualise the conflict and destruction surrounding the victim."},{"_id":"418ccdbc3da07ff50300005f","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":3,"parentId":"418ca0a83da07ff503000058","content":"#Difference between opponents\nA final way in which Carson shows the conflict is in the difference between the two opposing groups. Carson amplifies the lack of communication between the two groups by showing that the riot squad, who are attempting to control everything, has numerous advantages over the rioters. Carson lists “A Saracen” (tank), “Kremlin-2 mesh” (armour), “Makrolon face-shields” and “Walkie-talkies” as items the riot squad posses, whereas the rioters have nothing but themselves, anything they may have brought with them, and their rage. This is just the sort of thing that is likely to have angered the rebels: seeing their enemies with official uniforms, using more advanced technology, and generally considering themselves “better people”, yet hypocritically restraining the rebels of their freedom to act upon what they believe in. A particularly noteworthy example of this is the walkie-talkies; as has been discussed, communication between both sides has broken down, and seeing their opposition communicating with each other to strengthen themselves, yet refusing to reason with them, will make the rebels’ boil."},{"_id":"418c7e103da07ff503000048","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":3,"parentId":"40ac17b135833d481e00001c","content":"#Critical Essays - Romeo and Juliet"},{"_id":"418c6cd93da07ff50300003f","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":0.5,"parentId":"418c7e103da07ff503000048","content":"#Love Essay"},{"_id":"418c6fb23da07ff503000041","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":0.5,"parentId":"418c6cd93da07ff50300003f","content":"#Questions\n2) Choose a play in which there is an important relationship between two of the main characters.\nDescribe the nature of the relationship, and explain how it is developed throughout the play.\n - afjna\n\n 6) Choose a play which has developed your understanding of an important human emotion such as love, hatred, jealousy or any other emotion. \nShow how this understanding has been developed through the playwright’s use of dramatic techniques.\n - dalnf\n\n8) Choose a play which deals with an important human issue. \nState what the issue is and explain how one or more of the characters in the play deal with it. ???\n - lkfdd"},{"_id":"418c76153da07ff503000042","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":0.75,"parentId":"418c6cd93da07ff50300003f","content":"#Plan \nIntro: - Techiques\nPCQE 1 – Hate\nPCQE 2 – Infatuation }\nPCQE 3 – Family love } false\nPCQE 4 – True Love"},{"_id":"418c787f3da07ff503000043","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":0.875,"parentId":"418c6cd93da07ff50300003f","content":"#Into\nThe brilliant play Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare is an incredibly emotive drama, which, through the use of powerful contrasts, develops Shakespeare’s view & my understanding of the human emotion of love."},{"_id":"418c78d83da07ff503000044","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":0.9375,"parentId":"418c6cd93da07ff50300003f","content":"#Hatred\nFrom the offset of the play, Shakespeare makes it clear that hate and conflict are major presences with massive influences on the action. In the very first scene, a burning hatred between the two families – the Montagues and Capulets – is made painfully clear, through a fight breaking out, not even between the families to start with, but between their servants, before other members of the family join in too. However, the very embodiment and personification of hatred is Tybalt Capulet, whose hatred for the Montagues knows no bounds, as we see when he tells Benvolio:\n“Peace? I hate the word,\nAs I hate Hell, all Montagues and thee”\nShakespeare uses climax for effect here, and we see that Hell, the most feared and hated place in existence, is a mere third in Tybalt’s list of hatreds. With this being the climate that Romeo and Juliet have grown up in, it is a miracle they are able to love at all, let alone the people they are supposed to hate the most."},{"_id":"418c79343da07ff503000045","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":0.96875,"parentId":"418c6cd93da07ff50300003f","content":"#Superficial Family Love\nIf any love would be assumed to be a bond unbreakable, the parent-and-child love or family love should certainly be a contender – yet Shakespeare elects to show us that this love is, here, in fact false. We see that when everything is fine and simple, Juliet’s parents’ love for their only child comes easy; she is “the hopeful lady of [her father’s] Earth”, after all. But the moment she opposes them, by refusing to marry Paris, this illusion shatters completely, and her parents suddenly consider “this one [Juliet] too much, and that we have a curse in having her.” Through this, Shakespeare shows us that true love is not something that comes easily, and reinforces the hostile environment the lovers are growing up in."},{"_id":"418c79863da07ff503000046","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":0.984375,"parentId":"418c6cd93da07ff50300003f","content":"#False Infatuation\nShakespeare also look at false love through Romeo; this time, by his infatuation with Rosaline. As opposed to the joy, peace and happiness true love brings, we see that Romeo’s “love” is a dark one, causing him pain and suffering. Confusing images swamp Romeo’s feelings for her, as Shakespeare riddles Romeo’s speech about her with oxymorons and dark imagery, as he talks of “heavy lightness, serious vanity, misshapen chaos of well-seeming forms!” Through heavy oxymoron and antithesis use, Shakespeare shows us that infatuation and false love bring only confusion and sadness. This only makes the great turnaround, where Romeo meets and falls for Juliet, even more spectacular, and their love even more perfect and beautiful."},{"_id":"418c79e93da07ff503000047","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":0.9921875,"parentId":"418c6cd93da07ff50300003f","content":"#Comparative Difference - True Love\nFinally, having shown us many antitheses to true love – hate, superficial family love and false, painful infatuation – Shakespeare reveals true love to us, and amplifies it his beliefs about it by making it the antithesis to the above emotions. Its opposition to hatred is clear, and backed up by Juliet’s unhesitant willingness to “no longer be a Capulet,” forgoing her hatred for the other Montagues in order to be able to love Romeo; in the same line, she shows that she knows this love is worth more than her family’s and is willing to give even that up for Romeo. We also see the turnaround for Romeo; his lover no longer causes him to endure “feather[s] of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health” but rather she “doth teach torches to burn bright”, being “like a jewel in an Ethiop’s ear” – a remarkable turnaround from the dark to light imagery, and also showing his willingness to love his “jewel” even when she belongs to a family which he hates (the “Ethiop[ian]’s ear”). Throughout this wonderful revelation, we see Shakespeare developing our understanding of love, of its trueness, ability to calm hatred, power, and the joy and happiness it brings."},{"_id":"418c6d733da07ff503000040","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":"418c6cd93da07ff50300003f","content":"#Conclusion\nOverall, Shakespeare has used fantastically the technique of contrast –specifically, through oxymoron and antithesis – to show to us the power that true love has, in his most famous romantic tragedy Romeo and Juliet.\n"},{"_id":"418cf90d3da07ff503000068","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":2,"parentId":"418c6cd93da07ff50300003f","content":"#Necessary Quotations\n - \n - \n - "},{"_id":"418c7e933da07ff503000049","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":"418c7e103da07ff503000048","content":"#Turning Point"},{"_id":"418c81b13da07ff50300004b","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":0.5,"parentId":"418c7e933da07ff503000049","content":"#Questions\n5) Choose a play in which a main character’s actions have a significant effect on the rest of the play. \n Show how this character’s actions have affected the other characters and/or the outcome of the play.\n - fnakfj\n\n9) Choose a play in which there is a scene which could be described as a turning point in the fate of one or more of the characters. \nShow how this scene could be described as a turning point and explain how it increased your understanding of the character or the characters in the rest of the play.\n - alfn\n\n4) Choose a play in which there is conflict between two characters in a family or a group. \nShow how the conflict occurs and explain how it affects the characters and the events of the play\n - Conflict is between Tybalt and the Monts; kills M, TP happens\n\n1) Choose a play in which there is a character who suffers from a human weakness such as ambition, selfishness, lack of self-knowledge, jealousy, pride, lust . . .\nShow how the weakness is revealed, then explain how this weakness affects both the characters and the events of the play.\n - Romeo succumbs to his *reckless passion* when M is killed; TP happens"},{"_id":"418c81833da07ff50300004a","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":"418c7e933da07ff503000049","content":"#Plan:\n1. TP – M and T, change in R, foreshadow\n2. Lead-up – covers hate w/R&J’s love\n3. Result - seperation\n4. Effect on Fate etc"},{"_id":"418c84073da07ff50300004c","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":2,"parentId":"418c7e933da07ff503000049","content":"#Intro\nThe emotive play Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare is one of his most famous works, in which he successfully employs use of a turning point both in the action and in Romeo’s character to more emotively convey the tragedy surrounding the lovers’ deaths."},{"_id":"418c84953da07ff50300004d","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":3,"parentId":"418c7e933da07ff503000049","content":"#T.P.\nThe turning point of the play comes around directly as a result of a change in Romeo’s character, when his emotions of love are overturned. The previous acts of the play have laid out the hatred between the two families painfully clearly, before building up Romeo and Juliet’s love over this conflict, making it appear all the more pure and perfect through comparative difference – indeed, Juliet’s “love hath made [Romeo] effeminate,” as Romeo himself concedes. However, in Act 3:1, yet another conflict arises, and in the midst of protecting Romeo, Mercutio (his best friend) is murdered by Tybalt, Juliet’s cousin. In the heat of the moment, the thin ice of love Romeo has been dancing on shatters, and he plunges back into his old ways of hatred, “fire-ey’d fury [being his] conduct now!” In one evil act of conflict by Tybalt, Romeo’s love is overpowered with hatred, and Romeo reacts to that hatred, in his fury avenging Mercutio by murdering Tybalt. With such a blemish upon both his love and his name, we see the tide of the story turn: the lovers’ love is questioned; Romeo must flee Verona, lest he be executed; and the story turns towards the fatal path predicted in the Prologue, heralded by Mercutio’s final cry of “a plague o’both your houses,” foreshadowing the curse that will indeed fall upon both families when the lovers take their own lives."},{"_id":"418c85803da07ff50300004e","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":4,"parentId":"418c7e933da07ff503000049","content":"#Build-Up\nA turning point must have a path to turn away from: in this case, Romeo turns away from the love he has for Juliet, which Shakespeare has carefully built up over the conflict between their two families. The hatred between them has been made clear from the very first scene of the play, where not even the families, but the servants, of the opposing houses start a quarrel, in which the families soon join and the upheaval quickly descends into a brawl. That even their servants meeting should bring disquiet shows how deeply ingrained the conflict is: however, it is Tybalt, the personification of hate, that marks clearest the hatred between them, as he tells Benvolio:\n“…peace? I hate the word,\n\t As I hate Hell, all Montagues and thee.”\nShakespeare uses climax for effect here, and we see that Hell, the most feared and hated place in existence, comes a mere third in the things Tybalt hates, behind his all-consuming hatred for the Montagues and, at that moment, Benvolio.\nHowever, even against this backdrop, Shakespeare shows that true love can still blossom, through the love of Romeo and Juliet. Shakespeare shows us that though her family is like “an Ethiop’s ear” in their darkness and the hatred they have for him, Romeo can still find it in his heart to love his “rich jewel” in Juliet, as her beauty and preciousness (as shown by the image of a jewel) is more than worth giving up his hate However, even against this backdrop, Shakespeare shows that true love can still blossom, through the love of Romeo and Juliet. Shakespeare shows us that though her family is like “an Ethiop’s ear” in their darkness and the hatred they have for him, Romeo can still find it in his heart to love his “rich jewel” in Juliet, as her beauty and preciousness (as shown by the image of a jewel) is more than worth giving up his hate for her family. Similarly, Juliet is willing to “no longer be a Capulet,” renouncing her name – in those days, a great proportion of what defined you – in return for love, if that is what is how much she must sacrifice. Through comparative difference, Shakespeare displays their love in the most pure and perfect way, showing that true love can triumph over hatred – but also making it that much more tragic when Romeo lets hatred overpower him, dramatising the turning point even further."},{"_id":"418c86973da07ff503000050","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":4.5,"parentId":"418c7e933da07ff503000049","content":"#Effects of TP\nThe effects of the turning point devastate the lovers: now a murderer, Romeo is forced to flee from Verona for his life; but to keep his physical life, he must lose his life with Juliet. The torment and confusion this causes her is displayed through heavy oxymoron use; she fears she has married a “serpent heart, hid with flowering face” or “dragon [that] keep[s] so fair a cave” in Romeo; terrified she has fallen in love with someone who does not love her back, and seeks only to bring chaos and destruction. Meanwhile, Romeo laments that:\n “…every cat and dog\n\t And little mouse, every unworthy thing,\n\tLive here in heaven, and may look on [Juliet],\n\t\tBut Romeo may not”\nThe separation the turning point brings shows the turn things have taken for the worst, and gives a glimpse of the heart-wrenching pain of loss that will eventually lead them both to take their own lives."},{"_id":"418c85ec3da07ff50300004f","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":5,"parentId":"418c7e933da07ff503000049","content":"#Wrap-Up: Effects on Fate/Free Will\nThe turning point of the play gives insight into the powers working throughout it: specifically, that of fate working against free will. It is interesting to note that, while each character exercises their will freely, and victories in battles for love or hate suggest a breaking away from the predestined, at no point are they ever put off course for their final fate set out for them in the Prologue, where:\n\t“A pair of star-cross’d lovers take their life,\n\t … Doth with their death bury their parent’s strife.”\nRomeo meets the love of his life, and they choose to marry each other, apparently a victory for love; but to reach Juliet, he must break into the Capulet’s party, sparking Tybalt’s fury and paving the path for the turning point scene. Tybalt is killed, destroying hate’s personification; yet this results in Romeo’s banishment. Yet, even this is not a clear-cut victory: Romeo’s banishment, eventually leading to his and Juliet’s death, evidently a victory for hate, in fact results in the union for the two previously opposing families, and hate has destroyed itself. The turning point is a clear exemplar that the characters, no matter what they do, are resigned to the fate written out for them in the Prologue, and fate will always bend every character’s actions towards its own goal.\n"},{"_id":"418c8aa23da07ff503000051","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":6,"parentId":"418c7e933da07ff503000049","content":"#Conclusion\nOverall, Shakespeare has used a turning point very effectively in his emotive play Romeo and Juliet, in order to better convey the tragedy surrounding the couple and explore the themes of love, hate and fate."},{"_id":"418cfa013da07ff503000069","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":7,"parentId":"418c7e933da07ff503000049","content":"#Necessary Quotations\n - \n - \n - "},{"_id":"418c8b783da07ff503000052","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":2,"parentId":"418c7e103da07ff503000048","content":"#Tragic Ending"},{"_id":"418c8bc03da07ff503000053","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":"418c8b783da07ff503000052","content":"#Questions\n3) Choose a play which you feel has a dramatic final scene.\nDescribe briefly what happens and explain how effective the ending is in bringing to a conclusion the central concerns of the text characterisation, key scene(s), structure, climax, theme, plot, conflict, setting . . .\n - f n\n\n8) Choose a play which has tragic ending - Show how the ending of the play results from the strengths and/or weaknesses of the main character(s)\n - aj"},{"_id":"418d35ea3da07ff50300006c","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":1.5,"parentId":"418c8b783da07ff503000052","content":"#Beta Plan - Similar to TP\n - Intro\n - What the tragic ending is\n - What lead up to the tragic ending\n - The effect of the tragic ending + it's wrapping up of the plot/concerns\n - The reference to fate/free will paragraph (TP)"},{"_id":"418d3e993da07ff50300006d","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":1.75,"parentId":"418c8b783da07ff503000052","content":"#Intro"},{"_id":"418d3eda3da07ff50300006e","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":1.875,"parentId":"418c8b783da07ff503000052","content":"#The Ending"},{"_id":"418d3f213da07ff50300006f","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":1.9375,"parentId":"418c8b783da07ff503000052","content":"#The lead-up (eg TP)"},{"_id":"418d40093da07ff503000070","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":1.96875,"parentId":"418c8b783da07ff503000052","content":"#Effect of Ending"},{"_id":"418d40963da07ff503000071","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":1.984375,"parentId":"418c8b783da07ff503000052","content":"#Wrap-Up: Effects on Fate/Free Will\nThe turning point of the play gives insight into the powers working throughout it: specifically, that of fate working against free will. It is interesting to note that, while each character exercises their will freely, and victories in battles for love or hate suggest a breaking away from the predestined, at no point are they ever put off course for their final fate set out for them in the Prologue, where:\n\t“A pair of star-cross’d lovers take their life,\n\t … Doth with their death bury their parent’s strife.”\nRomeo meets the love of his life, and they choose to marry each other, apparently a victory for love; but to reach Juliet, he must break into the Capulet’s party, sparking Tybalt’s fury and paving the path for the turning point scene. Tybalt is killed, destroying hate’s personification; yet this results in Romeo’s banishment. Yet, even this is not a clear-cut victory: Romeo’s banishment, eventually leading to his and Juliet’s death, evidently a victory for hate, in fact results in the union for the two previously opposing families, and hate has destroyed itself. The turning point is a clear exemplar that the characters, no matter what they do, are resigned to the fate written out for them in the Prologue, and fate will always bend every character’s actions towards its own goal.\n#`Releventify`"},{"_id":"418d42673da07ff503000072","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":1.9921875,"parentId":"418c8b783da07ff503000052","content":"#Conclusion"},{"_id":"418cfa6a3da07ff50300006b","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":2,"parentId":"418c8b783da07ff503000052","content":"#Necessary Quotations\n - \n - \n - "},{"_id":"40ac182235833d481e00001d","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":2,"parentId":"40ac168735833d481e00001b","content":"#Maths"},{"_id":"40ac22b335833d481e000023","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":"40ac182235833d481e00001d","content":"#Quadratics"},{"_id":"40ac232e35833d481e000024","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":2,"parentId":"40ac182235833d481e00001d","content":"#Algebra"},{"_id":"40ac23b335833d481e000025","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":3,"parentId":"40ac182235833d481e00001d","content":"#Geometry"},{"_id":"40ac185e35833d481e00001e","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":3,"parentId":"40ac168735833d481e00001b","content":"#Geography"},{"_id":"40ac18d035833d481e00001f","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":"40ac185e35833d481e00001e","content":"#Rivers"},{"_id":"40ac200235833d481e000022","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":1.5,"parentId":"40ac185e35833d481e00001e","content":"#Urban"},{"_id":"40ac193135833d481e000020","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":2,"parentId":"40ac185e35833d481e00001e","content":"#Rural"},{"_id":"40ac255735833d481e000027","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":2,"parentId":null,"content":"#Fun Stuffs"},{"_id":"40ac25db35833d481e000028","treeId":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":"40ac255735833d481e000027","content":"#Pokémon"}],"tree":{"_id":"40ac141435833d481e00000d","name":"English Critical Analysis Writing","publicUrl":"english-critical-analysis-writing"}}