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GEO Location & GEO Fencing

Hyper Contextual Targeting:

Uses location as well as other contexts to target customers with meaningful ads. Marketers use geographic location in combination with past locations visited, intent based on search history, geography specific events, or weather, etc. to serve them relevant ads. For example, marketers target users with ads for indoor activities on a rainy or cold day and outdoor events on a warm sunny day.

Geo Exclusion: It is a feature where many ad service providers, like Google Ads, allow you to exclude specific locations where you can prevent the ad from showing. You could omit poorly performing locations or locations where your ads do not have a target audience. For example, if you are promoting your business in a locality, you could exclude a school in the vicinity, where it could cause a distraction.

Keyword Targeting: Use of keywords to limit targeting around a location is another geo-advertising technique. Instead of relying only on location, you focus on specific keywords that fit your campaign or are better suited for that location. These keywords lead searchers to the results about local businesses. The customer need not be in the location; it is her intent that matters.

For example, a search query for ‘Gyms in Irwin’ provides location intent. You can include ZIP or area code, neighborhood, landmarks, community name, street names, popular clubs, etc. to power up your keyword-based geo-ads.

source: https://www.martechadvisor.com/articles/geolocation/geolocation-for-social-targeting-and-advertising/

Effect on Customer Experience

The use of these strategies enhances the customer’s experience by connecting with them where and where it matters most. By using mobile geographical information, Thinknear was able to target Whole Foods consumers either when they were in the same area as a Whole Foods store, or when they were visiting a competitor grocery store. This means that consumers were served the ad when buying groceries was fresh in their minds. Instead of serving an ad at any given time when the call to action could be forgotten, Whole Foods communicated their message when it was most relevant to the customer and therefore resulted in greater conversion rates. In terms of timing, customers were served most ads on the weekends. Most consumers buy their food for the upcoming week between Friday and Sunday, which served as the rationale for the timing that the ads were served (Kaplan). Again, by serving the mobile ads when it was most relevant to the customer, the post click-through conversion rates were increased.

source: https://mallorysugita.wordpress.com/2017/11/24/whole-foods-thinknear-the-incredible-location-based-mobile-campaign/?zd_source=mta&zd_campaign=10917&zd_term=vanditagrover

The EPOC Method: How to Make Your * Product Uniquely Valuable

In other words, if the question is “how strongly is my course differentiated from the competition”, EPOC can provide a quick answer.

  • Your course is unique and different from competing products along these 4 main aspects:
    Expertise
    Problem
    Outcome
    Character

Expertise

Your background and how you acquired your expertise and knowledge makes your course different from others on the same topic. By itself, this is a weak differentiating factor, but it’s one that you have a lot of control over.

Problem

As a course creator, you identify a problem or a set of problems that you aim to help people solve. The problems you choose will be different from those chosen by your competitors and your angle of attack on those problems can also be a differentiating factor.

Patients Take Their Complaints Online

  • Although medical expertise and quality of care may be central to the patient experience, they take a back seat when it comes to online reviews of physicians.
  • Patients posting negative reviews on rating sites, such as Vitals, RateMDs, and Yelp, are often more vocal about the “softer” side of medicine than they are about clinical matters.
  • Their complaints can sully even the most polished reputation.

source: https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/820809

Online Complaints? Blame Customer Service, Not Doctors’ Care

By Vanguard Communications

Home » Online Complaints? Blame Customer Service, Not Doctors’ Care

A nationwide study has uncovered what drives patients to write glowing, or scathing, reviews on the Internet. For a study of online doctor reviews coast to coast, Vanguard Communications developed special software to analyze Google+ reviews of doctors, group medical practices, clinics and hospitals.

The software analyzed 34,748 patients’ reviews of their physicians throughout the United States and determined that customer service is the leading distinction between highly rated and poorly rated doctors.

After compiling data containing the words patients used in describing their experiences with medical practices, the software determined the most common phrases associated with each review star level. An analysis of these most common phrases revealed that an incredible 96 percent of patient complaints are customer-service related, while a mere 4 percent complain about quality of care or misdiagnosis.

source: https://vanguardcommunications.net/patient-complaints/

Summary of findings

96 percent of patient complaints are customer service related

4 percent are healthcare related

Of the customer service complaints:

53 percent of complaints are related to communication

35 percent of complaints are related to long wait times/waiting rooms

12 percent of complaints are related to practice staff

2 percent of complaints are related to billing

Of the compliments:

40 percent of five-star compliments are related to bedside manner

28 percent of five-star compliments are related to practice staff

24 percent of five-star compliments are related to communication

The reviewers:

61 percent gave five stars, producing 69 percent of content

5 percent gave four stars, producing 5 percent of content

3 percent gave three stars, producing 4 percent of content

9 percent gave two stars, producing 11 percent of content

23 percent gave one star, producing 12 percent of content

source: https://vanguardcommunications.net/patient-complaints/

Actions doctors can take

While some patients may incorrectly blame doctors for a misdiagnosis, this appears to a very small minority. The large majority of patients are eager to compliment their doctors. Complaints could largely be eliminated by medical practices if they implemented the following measures.

Better communication: Practices must keep their patients informed. Patients can tolerate surprising medical results, but they do not tolerate surprises elsewhere (long wait times, difficulty booking appointments, difficulty obtaining test results). Keep your patients informed! If wait times are going to be above 15 minutes, let the patient know. Doctors should ask the patient if all questions have been answered or if there is anything more they can do for them. Staff should do the same.

Better organization: Find the most organized individual you can and hire them. You need to have someone on your team who can ensure things are kept in order so that when patients ask questions, you can spend your time answering them rather than hunting for the answer. While long wait times may be unavoidable at times, better communication and organization can minimize this complaint. Automatic appointment reminders and online scheduling may help reduce large variations in daily patient load.

Better disposition: Cheerful and empathetic staff can help ensure patients feel as comfortable as possible. While a great team can’t solve all problems, it can help a good practice become great.

source: https://vanguardcommunications.net/patient-complaints/

Outcome

You identify an outcome you want to help your customer reach and you build an Outcome Oriented Course around that. This alone is a differentiating factor, since so many courses are knowledge downloads and just aren’t well focused on a desirable outcome.

AIDET: Five Steps to Achieving SatisfactionUnderstanding AIDET

AIDET is a framework for Sharp’s staff to communicate with patients and their families as well as with each other. It is a simple acronym that represents a very powerful way to communicate with people who are often nervous, anxious and feeling vulnerable. It can also be used as we communicate with other staff and colleagues, especially when we are providing an internal service.

source: https://www.sharp.com/about/the-sharp-experience/aidet.cfm

Maximizing revenue through relationships

  • Patient Engagement Billing & Collections

  • Maintaining financial stability is a challenge for any healthcare provider’s office, especially in the age of patient consumerism. The increases in regulation and the transparency of medical care processes have given rise to healthcare consumerism, wherein newly empowered patients have control over their healthcare experience. Along with shifting reimbursement strategies and the increased demand on patient financial responsibility, improving your bottom line has become even trickier.

  • Every station in the revenue cycle has room for improvement, and it’s difficult to keep those processes efficient and optimized for maximum recoveries in conditions of continuous change. Whether you’re trying to appeal to the healthcare consumer, collect more data from patients, process insurance claims more efficiently or collect patient revenue, healthcare providers face many challenges, but there are several solutions to maximize revenue collection with the healthcare consumer in mind.

source: https://www.mgma.com/resources/revenue-cycle/maximizing-revenue-through-relationships

Improving patient engagement in rural America

  • Like all health organizations, rural practices are increasingly called upon to improve patient engagement. This isn’t surprising, considering patient engagement is linked directly to better health outcomes and lower costs of care.1 It is also credited with minimizing care disparities among patients with challenging social determinants, improving medication compliance and more.

  • However, guidance on how to “engage” patients properly — to achieve high metrics such as the ones cited in medical studies — is sometimes a little vague. Improving the frequency with which a patient connects to his or her provider and takes ownership of health outcomes raises many questions: Can a provider reap the benefits of engagement by simply buying a portal to send secure messages to a patient (per the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services [CMS] Promoting Interoperability guidelines)? Or must a provider connect with patients daily, in and out of the office, to ensure that patients’ health scores improve?

source: https://www.mgma.com/resources/quality-patient-experience/improving-patient-engagement-in-rural-america

The humanizing effect: Changing public perception of clinicians through social media

  • Marketing/Social Media Patient Engagement

  • Within the constant stream of posts, tweets and comments on social media, individuality is often lost, particularly when one’s voice does not rise above the rest. This lack of originality and expertise makes it more difficult to forge a deep connection with an audience or individual. Such is the challenge for many clinicians, as social media can devolve into a platform for perpetuating unflattering stereotypes of doctors.

  • But it doesn’t have to be this way. By telling their story and going the extra mile for patients, clinicians can use social media to develop and nurture meaningful connections. Considering clinicians only spend a quarter of their time meeting with patients face to face, social media can be an invaluable outlet for promoting their clinical knowledge and humanizing them.

  • As Kevin Pho, MD, founder and editor of KevinMD.com, Nashua, N.H., noted during his session at MGMA18 | The Annual Conference, time spent on other tasks has contributed to a disconnect between clinicians and their patients: “… for every hour we spend with patients, we spend

source: https://www.mgma.com/resources/operations-management/the-humanizing-effect-changing-public-perception

Survey says: Achieving and sustaining outstanding patient satisfaction

  • Patient satisfaction surveys can be a valuable tool to measure the patient’s perspective of providers and staff of medical facilities. Using these tools wisely is the key to raising the bar on service excellence, which should be the goal of everyone in the healthcare industry.

  • The perception of patients is what drives patient satisfaction; therefore, it is extremely important to explore the factors that the patient values and implement changes if necessary based on those

source: https://www.mgma.com/resources/quality-patient-experience/survey-says-achieving-and-sustaining-outstanding

Your patient has something to say: Taking customer service insights from the patient’s perspective

  • The increasing importance of the patient experience necessitates benchmarking and reporting for patient satisfaction goals. Insurance companies, compliance efforts and other initiatives have made customer service and satisfaction a central consideration of patient retention. How we administer the increased demand for patient advocacy is reflected with every patient interaction.

  • Accountable care organization (ACO) success is measured in part by patient engagement, which includes physician communication, access to specialists, health promotion and education and shared decision-making. Quality measurements and performance standards can have substantial impact on your revenue.

source: https://www.mgma.com/resources/quality-patient-experience/your-patient-has-something-to-say

Character

Your personal character, presentation style and world view play into the value of your course. In fact, character is more important than most people realize.

Find Your Strengths

Although I was skeptical at first, after someone recommended I take a test to create a strengths profile of myself, I found the results surprisingly useful. So I’ll recommend the same.

  • There are two strengths assessment surveys I can recommend. The first is the Clifton Strengths Test by Gallup. This one costs around $45 to take and if you can comfortably afford that, I recommend it.
    https://www.gallupstrengthscenter.com/

  • As a free alternative, there’s the VIA Survey. This is also a thorough and scientifically based test to determine your top strengths and weaknesses. I found the results of this one useful as well.
    http://viasurvey.org/

3 Ways to Differentiate Your Product

From a high level perspective, there are 3 ways in which you can differentiate your course in a highly competitive niche:

1) “It’s a [topic] course, but for [specific kind of person]”

  • this is the first and most important way in which you can ensure that your course isn’t generic. A generic “fitness program” becomes a “booty workout for busy moms”. A generic “productivity course” becomes a “productivity course for digital nomads”. Instead of a generic book about meditation, we get Meditation for Fidgety Skeptics (probably my all time favorite book title).

“It’s a Patient Engagment course, but for Practice Managers

“It’s an Engagment course, but for Practice Managers and their Clients

“It’s an Patient Education course, but for Practice Managers and their Clients

2) “It’s a [topic] course, but new/better in [specific way]”

  • we live in a fast paced world. Things are constantly changing. And that means there’s constant opportunity to present an old topic in a new way. As long as you can clearly define what is new and better about your approach and it’s new and better in a way that appeals to a certain sub-group of the market, you’ve got a good method of differentiation on your hands.

“It’s a Patient Engagement course, but new in Social Media

“It’s a Patient Education course, but new in Social Media Engagement

“It’s a Patient Satisfaction course, but new in Social Media Engagement

3) “It’s a [topic] course, but NOT like the others in [specific way]”

  • this is one of my favorite ways to differentiate a product. I look at the competition and look for flaws. I look for a way to differentiate my product against what I see as shortcomings in the competition. So, a generic meditation course becomes “meditation without the spiritual nonsense” or a personal development course becomes “pragmatic personal development without the motivational BS”. Or perhaps “business coaching by someone who’s main job isn’t being a business coach”.

“It’s a Patient Engagment course, but NOT like the others in personal communication skills

“It’s a Patient Gateway course, but NOT like the others in portals, websites and CRM

“It’s a Patient Portal course, but NOT like the others in web design, applications and costs

What are our competitors selling

Course Platforms

Course platforms aren’t great for selling your course, for many reasons, but they are fantastic as a research source.

Udemy

  • highly popular course platform where courses on every imaginable topic are sold for bottom-of-the-barrel prices. That means there’s a lot of volume and a lot of very low quality stuff. You can see public reviews and ratings for courses. You can also see exactly how many students each course has, letting you estimate how much (how little, in most cases) the course creator earned.

Skillshare

  • more polished, higher end course platform than Udemy, with a more limited range of topics. Shows you how many students signed up for each course.

Lynda

  • a more business focused course platform, now owned by Linkedin. Shows “views” for each course, which is still an interesting indicator of popularity or sales potential.

Marketplaces

Marketplaces that show public reviews are a goldmine of competitive information and you can often gleam some further insights by looking at things like related products.

Best EHR Software System Comparison

SelectHub is real people helping you find the best EHR Software for your unique business needs while recognizing the true solution leaders who help make your decisions possible.

source: https://selecthub.com/ehr-software/

Amazon

  • no matter what you sell, check what’s being sold on Amazon for your main topic keywords. First of all, because books are information products and a highly sellable book could be a highly sellable course in a different life. But also because Amazon reviews and related products can give you rich insights into what people in your market care about, what they love, what they hate and what they spend money on.

Kickstarter

  • very interesting source of insights because people actually pay up front for ideas and prototypes. What you learn on Kickstarter usually doesn’t directly translate to a course idea (most Kickstarter projects are physical products), but you should still be aware of what products are popular and unpopular on Kickstarter, in your niche.

Patreon

  • on Patreon, people can pay creators and artists directly for their work. Many podcasters, YouTubers and creative artists have Patreon supporters. This is an interesting source because it mostly comes down to personal branding. Generally, people give direct support to someone they like or relate to on Patreon, rather than strictly paying for the creator’s work. Get an idea of who is popular and unpopular to see what “plays well” in your niche.

Gurus, Blogs & Brands

  • Whatever market you are in, you need to be aware of and following the top gurus, brands and blogs in your space.
  • What are the must-read blogs in your space? Who are the social media superstars? What are everybody’s-darling brands?
  • And more specifically: who’s selling courses in your market? Who has already built an information product empire?

Who’s selling Courses

  • look into the big EMR

Social Nedia Following

  • LinkedIn
  • Docimity

Top Blogs/brands

  • LinkedIn Groups - Patient Edu

How to Create a Kick-Ass Sales Page, Part 1

Okay, you now know why you should start with your sales page. But how do you go about creating a sales page, exactly?

Pain points:

what are significant pain points people in your audience suffer? What do they worry about and what keeps them up at night?

5. Communicates time-efficiently

  • Healthcare providers today have the responsibility to not only provide care to their patients, but also educate, engage, and motivate them to be proactive in their care.
  • This is a lot to accomplish in a typical encounter. Video patient decision aids can help overcome the challenges associated with the barrier of time.

source: https://acpdecisions.org/12-reasons-why-video-is-a-crucial-element-of-shared-decision-making/

Your patient has something to say:

  • Taking customer service insights from the patient’s perspective

The increasing importance of the patient experience

  • necessitates benchmarking and reporting for patient satisfaction goals. Insurance companies, compliance efforts and other initiatives have made customer service and satisfaction a central consideration of patient retention. How we administer the increased demand for patient advocacy is reflected with every patient interaction.

  • Accountable care organization (ACO) success is measured in part by patient engagement, which includes physician communication, access to specialists, health promotion and education and shared decision-making. Quality measurements and performance standards can have substantial impact on your revenue.

source: https://www.mgma.com/resources/quality-patient-experience/your-patient-has-something-to-say

Conclusions Examination

  • of the current literature shows there are considerable gaps in knowledge regarding patient engagement in the hospital setting and inconsistent use of terminology regarding patient engagement overall.
  • Research on inpatient engagement technologies has been limited, especially concerning the impact on health outcomes and cost-effectiveness.

source: https://academic.oup.com/jamia/article/21/4/742/763163

Achieving and sustaining outstanding patient satisfaction

  • Patient satisfaction surveys can be a valuable tool to measure the patient’s perspective of providers and staff of medical facilities. Using these tools wisely is the key to raising the bar on service excellence, which should be the goal of everyone in the healthcare industry.

  • The perception of patients is what drives patient satisfaction; therefore, it is extremely important to explore the factors that the patient values and implement changes if necessary based on those

source: https://www.mgma.com/resources/quality-patient-experience/survey-says-achieving-and-sustaining-outstanding

The humanizing effect: Changing public perception of clinicians through social media

Marketing/Social Media Patient Engagement

  • Within the constant stream of posts, tweets and comments on social media, individuality is often lost, particularly when one’s voice does not rise above the rest.
  • This lack of originality and expertise makes it more difficult to forge a deep connection with an audience or individual. Such is the challenge for many clinicians, as social media can devolve into a platform for perpetuating unflattering stereotypes of doctors.
  • But it doesn’t have to be this way. By telling their story and going the extra mile for patients, clinicians can use social media to develop and nurture meaningful connections.
  • Considering clinicians only spend a quarter of their time meeting with patients face to face, social media can be an invaluable outlet for promoting their clinical knowledge and humanizing them.

  • As Kevin Pho, MD, founder and editor of KevinMD.com, Nashua, N.H., noted during his session at MGMA18 | The Annual Conference, time spent on other tasks has contributed to a disconnect between clinicians and their patients: “… for every hour we spend with patients, we spend

source: https://www.mgma.com/resources/operations-management/the-humanizing-effect-changing-public-perception

Benefits:

what are major benefits you deliver in your course? What are important A-to-B transformations someone will experience by implementing what you teach?

Shared Decision Making

  • Other articles describe challenges and opportunities in shared decision making—or, as detailed by Jaime King and Benjamin Moulton, the process of presenting treatment options to patients, providing a full picture of benefits and risks, encouraging deliberation, and eliciting patients’ care preferences.
  • Demonstrations at Seattle-based Group Health and elsewhere have already shown that fully informed patients often choose less invasive and lower-cost treatment than their doctors recommend—and that variation in practice patterns among different physicians also narrows as a result.
  • But while many physicians have bought into shared decision making, others haven’t. Grace Lin and coauthors describe a largely unsuccessful attempt to spread the use of decision aids—typically, brochures or videos that spell out pros and cons of various treatment options and can lay the groundwork for discussions between patients and physicians.
  • In their case study of five primary care practices in California, the effort ran into a number of obstacles—including some physicians’ reluctance to give up their traditional decision-making roles, their lack of training in communication, and their complaint that they simply lacked the time.

source: https://www.healthaffairs.org/doi/full/10.1377/hlthaff.2013.0037

Achieving The Potential

  • Wherever engagement takes place, the emerging evidence is that patients who are actively involved in their health and health care achieve better health outcomes, and have lower health costs, than those who aren’t.
  • Thus, patient engagement and activation are increasingly understood to be distinguishable factors in achieving the Triple Aim (hence, the “blockbuster drug” designation by Leonard Kish, a health information technology consultant).
  • The challenge is encouraging patients and providers alike to embrace engagement and achieve its full potential to improve health and care.A number of articles place the onus on care providers to “meet patients where they are” and build on their often limited initial capacity to engage.
  • Noting that many patients struggle to understand even basic health information, US Assistant Secretary for Health Howard Koh and colleagues call for a “health literate care” approach that would combine strategies to improve health literacy with the famed Chronic Care Model.
  • The model would take as a given that every patient is at risk of “not understanding their health conditions or how to deal with them,” and that the complexity of the health care system “challenges virtually everyone,” the authors write.

source: https://www.healthaffairs.org/doi/full/10.1377/hlthaff.2013.0037

Even in an age of hype, calling something “the blockbuster drug of the century” grabs our attention.

  • In this case, the “drug” is actually a concept—patient activation and engagement—that should have formed the heart of health care all along. The topic of this thematic issue of Health Affairs, patient engagement is variously defined; the Institute for Healthcare Improvement describes it as “actions that people take for their health and to benefit from care.”
  • Engagement’s close cousin is patient activation—“understanding one’s own role in the care process and having the knowledge, skills, and confidence to take on that role,” as Judith Hibbard and coauthors explain. * More holistic definitions broaden these concepts further, describing patients and families working with providers all across health care, in such areas as patient-centered outcomes research. Two articles in this issue, including Entry Point, examine engagement in the “ultimate conversation” about the end of life.

source: https://www.healthaffairs.org/doi/full/10.1377/hlthaff.2013.0037

Personalized decision support

  • In addition to improving the provision of information within healthcare, there are efforts to help patients and parents of patients make tough, personalized decisions.
  • Weyand et al90 designed a computerized decision support tool for parents with children in a neonatal ICU (NICU). The tool assisted parents in making informed decisions, allowed for greater communication with the physicians, and provided information on ethically challenging situations.
  • Initial studies, of eight parents, showed this tool offered potential benefits to both future parents and physicians working in the NICU.

source: https://academic.oup.com/jamia/article/21/4/742/763163

Patient-specific information delivery

  • In addition to simply providing the same information to all patients, several studies have focused on the provision of patient-specific information to increase patient engagement.
  • Bickmore et al14 developed an ‘animated, empathetic virtual nurse interface for educating and counseling hospital patients with inadequate health literacy’ at Boston Medical Center. This study of 49 patients found the system was easy to use, resulted in high levels of patient satisfaction, and most participants preferred receiving information from the virtual nurse over their actual doctor or nurse. They believed the system provided authoritative information and appreciated the time the virtual nurse spent with them. Some patients felt the system helped them become more involved in their care.
  • With the proliferation of mobile phones and tablet computers, new approaches of presenting health information and engaging patients in their healthcare are being introduced. Vardoulakis et al84 developed a mobile phone application that provided patients with ‘a dynamic, interactive report on their progress, care plan, and care team throughout their emergency department stay’.84 Patients found the information helped reduce anxiety and ‘regain some semblance of participation in their own care’.
  • Patients valued the educational component, reported greater awareness of their care teams, and appreciated the system’s ability to maintain privacy. The study found the system helped in ‘improving awareness, promoting patient empowerment, and enhancing ownership of medical information in hospitals’.84Similar to the work of Vardoulakis et al, Vawdrey et al85 developed a patient-facing tablet computer application that linked their institution’s EHR and PHR systems.
  • This application enabled five test patients to access information such as their care team profiles and hospital medication records. Through semi-structured interviews, patients reported that the application was useful as a memory aid, improved medication tracking ability, and fostered personal connections through care team member photographs. The tablet application was perceived to be a ‘useful tool for providing information and increasing patients’ engagement in their care’.85Dykes et al86 conducted another study that used a tablet device to provide patient-specific information. The authors led focus groups and used a participatory process to design an electronic bedside communication center.
  • The tool allowed patients to access tailored patient information and educational content. Usability testing results showed high satisfaction and high perceived value.A study by Wilcox et al87 assessed the usefulness of large in-room information displays in an emergency department. The displays included personalized information such as medications, vital signs, allergies, and care team details.
  • Results of the 18-patient study showed a positive response, and patients found having the information calming. The displays facilitated information sharing and promoted discussion with care providers. Patients also reported ‘the benefits of an in-room information display outweighed any privacy concerns’.87

source: https://academic.oup.com/jamia/article/21/4/742/763163

12 Reasons Why Video is a Crucial Element of Shared Decision Making

12. Improves patient access to information

  • On-demand videos can be viewed when a patient is ready and willing to learn. This gives patients the opportunity to re-view a video to enhance understanding and to develop questions. Patients are also able to easily share information with family or other caregivers.

  • There really is no downside to incorporating high-quality videos into the SDM process. If your facility or healthcare system is looking for high-quality video patient decision aids, educational videos and caregiver videos to engage your patients in shared decision making and advance care planning, consider ACP Decisions. Contact us today to learn more!

source: https://acpdecisions.org/12-reasons-why-video-is-a-crucial-element-of-shared-decision-making/

1. Meets today’s communication needs

  • Communication has become more digital and visual, with many people showing a preference for video content.
  • In 2016, an estimated 213 million people in the U.S. watched digital (online) videos, with 236 million viewers predicted by 2020.

source: https://acpdecisions.org/12-reasons-why-video-is-a-crucial-element-of-shared-decision-making/

2. Addresses different learning styles

  • At least 65 percent of the population are considered visual learners. These are people who retain information better by seeing pictures and videos rather than reading text or hearing information.

source: https://acpdecisions.org/12-reasons-why-video-is-a-crucial-element-of-shared-decision-making/

3. Videos don’t just tell, they show

  • Video combines sight, sound and motion, which together, capture attention like no other medium.
  • These features combined play a significant role in communicating effectively and offer the ability to present complex issues in a simpler way.

source: https://acpdecisions.org/12-reasons-why-video-is-a-crucial-element-of-shared-decision-making/

4. Improves information retention

  • The National Teacher Training Institute reports that instructional videos help students retain more information.
  • In fact, people retain 95 percent of a message when they watch it in a video, compared to 10% when reading it in text.
  • Based on these statistics alone, video is a great format to use to demonstrate and inform patients and caregivers.

source: https://acpdecisions.org/12-reasons-why-video-is-a-crucial-element-of-shared-decision-making/

5. Communicates time-efficiently

  • Healthcare providers today have the responsibility to not only provide care to their patients, but also educate, engage, and motivate them to be proactive in their care.
  • This is a lot to accomplish in a typical encounter. Video patient decision aids can help overcome the challenges associated with the barrier of time.

source: https://acpdecisions.org/12-reasons-why-video-is-a-crucial-element-of-shared-decision-making/

6. Drives patient engagement

  • According to Health Affairs, patients who are engaged become more actively involved in their care, leading to better outcomes and lower costs.
  • In many situations, particularly in the inpatient setting, it is a challenge to convey key health information in a short window of time that also happens to be a physically and emotionally stressful time.
  • Videos can play a substantial role in engaging patients in the hospital environment or in the ambulatory setting.

source: https://acpdecisions.org/12-reasons-why-video-is-a-crucial-element-of-shared-decision-making/

7. Drives patient activation and modifies behavior

  • Patient activation is defined as “understanding one’s own role in the care process and having the knowledge, skills, and confidence to take on that role.” When patients watch a video to learn about their condition, treatment or self-care, they are more likely to act on what they have seen.
  • A systematic review analyzed studies of video-assisted patient education to modify behavior. It found that video can be a highly effective form of patient education, particularly when presented in a narrative format.

source: https://acpdecisions.org/12-reasons-why-video-is-a-crucial-element-of-shared-decision-making/

8. Improves understanding of health concepts

  • Videos make information more digestible and easier to understand. Just watching a step-by-step video of what happens during a procedure helps patients gain a clearer understanding of what to expect.
  • Studies have shown that not only can visual aids improve understanding of health risks, but integrating them with information technology may further increase understanding and support more informed decision

source: https://acpdecisions.org/12-reasons-why-video-is-a-crucial-element-of-shared-decision-making/

9. Bridges literacy barriers

  • Limited health literacy is a problem in the U.S. In a world of increasingly complex healthcare choices, this puts many people at a disadvantage.
  • Research shows that patient knowledge and comprehension improves with the use of video-based education tools.

source: https://acpdecisions.org/12-reasons-why-video-is-a-crucial-element-of-shared-decision-making/

10. Helps overcome language barriers

  • Approximately 9 out of 100 people have limited English proficiency. Video presented in the preferred language of the patient can help them accurately understand healthcare information.

source: https://acpdecisions.org/12-reasons-why-video-is-a-crucial-element-of-shared-decision-making/

11. Enhances other forms of communication

  • Video, when used in conjunction with other forms of health education communication, such as discussion and written materials, ensures learning is incremental and may increase overall understanding.

source: https://acpdecisions.org/12-reasons-why-video-is-a-crucial-element-of-shared-decision-making/

12. Improves patient access to information

  • On-demand videos can be viewed when a patient is ready and willing to learn. This gives patients the opportunity to re-view a video to enhance understanding and to develop questions. Patients are also able to easily share information with family or other caregivers.

  • There really is no downside to incorporating high-quality videos into the SDM process. If your facility or healthcare system is looking for high-quality video patient decision aids, educational videos and caregiver videos to engage your patients in shared decision making and advance care planning, consider ACP Decisions. Contact us today to learn more!

source: https://acpdecisions.org/12-reasons-why-video-is-a-crucial-element-of-shared-decision-making/

Differentiation:

in what ways is your course different from competing products? In what ways is it different from what people in your audience are currently trying, to solve their problems?

Video content increases engagement with target audiences

  • A Facebook video receives, on average, 135% more organic reach than a Facebook photo (Socialbakers , 2015).

  • People spend, on average, more than 3x more time watching a Facebook Live video than a video that’s no longer live (Facebook , 2016); and Facebook users comment 10X more on live videos than they do on regular videos (Facebook , 2016).

  • Videos are 6X more likely to be retweeted than photos and 3X more likely than GIFs (Twitter , 2016).

  • People spend on average 2.6x more time on pages with video than without (Wistia )

  • Including video in a landing page can increase conversion by 80% (EyeView )

  • Using the word ‘video’ in an email subject line boosts the open rates by 19% (Syndacast)

  • 52% of marketing professionals worldwide name video as the type of content with the best ROI (Syndacast) .

source: https://digital.gov/2017/08/07/by-the-numbers-why-video-is-effective/

Meets today’s communication needs

  • Communication has become more digital and visual, with many people showing a preference for video content.
  • In 2016, an estimated 213 million people in the U.S. watched digital (online) videos, with 236 million viewers predicted by 2020.

source: https://acpdecisions.org/12-reasons-why-video-is-a-crucial-element-of-shared-decision-making/

Using video as part of a

  • comprehensive communication strategy can increase the engagement and effectiveness of the health messages. Recent data report:

  • Video is an extremely popular format for content delivery

  • 45% of people watch more than an hour of Facebook or YouTube videos a week. (HubSpot, 2016 )

  • 82% of Twitter users watch video content on Twitter (Bloomberg )

  • 59% of executives agree that if both text and video are available on the same topic, they are more likely to choose video (MWP) .

  • Among millennials, YouTube accounts for two-thirds of the premium online video watched across devices. (Google , 2016)

  • By 2017, video content will represent 74% of all internet traffic. (KPCB/Meeker, 2017 )

source: https://digital.gov/2017/08/07/by-the-numbers-why-video-is-effective/

Secrets:

what are the proprietary, brand-named recipes in your course? What are things only you teach?

Don’t just engage patients at your door—engage them online

In an increasingly consumer-driven health care market, it has become important for imaging programs to provide more direct patient education. One of the best vehicles for educating patients is through online materials.

Don’t just engage patients at your door—engage them online

  • In an increasingly consumer-driven health care market, it has become important for imaging programs to provide more direct patient education. One of the best vehicles for educating patients is through online materials.

  • Our 2015 Imaging Consumer Preferences Survey revealed that an increasing number of patients are using the internet to research imaging providers and facilities. One in four patients reported looking for patient reviews about an imaging facility or radiologist online, and one in five looked for quality information for the facility online.

  • However, imaging can be a difficult concept for patients to understand, so it is critical that online material is presented in a way that patients can understand. Recognizing the importance of having patient-friendly online material, one of our members, the University of San Francisco Medical Center, has invested a lot of time into bolstering their online presence. One of the key components of this online strategy is their UCSF Radiology Blog.

source: https://www.advisory.com/research/imaging-performance-partnership/the-reading-room/2016/02/patient-education-for-todays-consumer

Tips for optimizing your imaging blog

  • Whether you already have a well-developed online presence or are just starting a blog of your own, below are some of our best strategies for enhancing your blog presence:

  • Ask patients for their preferences for online education

  • Equip patients with information to discuss with their referring providers

  • Present data in a patient-friendly manner

  • Explain medical terms

  • Select topics that resonate with patients

  • Keep a regular blog schedule

  • Leverage full imaging staff as guest bloggers, especially when you have access to experts on trending topics

  • Highlight recent and upcoming imaging events

  • Showcase imaging’s achievements, such as awards or research

  • Track user statistics to understand which topics are the most popular

source: https://www.advisory.com/research/imaging-performance-partnership/the-reading-room/2016/02/patient-education-for-todays-consumer

Proof:

what stats, quotes, testimonials and social proof can you add, to back up your sales message?

Half the public now owns a tablet computer.

Though less widespread than smartphones, tablet computers have also become highly common in a very short period of time. When the Center first began tracking tablet ownership in 2010, just 3% of Americans owned a tablet of some kind. That figure has risen to 51% as of November 2016.

source: http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/01/12/evolution-of-technology/

Nearly seven-in-ten Americans now use social media.

When the Center started tracking social media adoption in 2005, just 5% of Americans said they used these platforms. Today, 69% of U.S. adults are social media users. Social media is especially popular among younger adults, as 86% of 18- to 29-year-olds are social media users. But a substantial majority of those ages 30-49 (80%) and 50-64 (64%) use social media as well. Only about one-third (34%) of Americans 65 and older currently use social media, but that figure has grown dramatically in recent years: As recently as 2010, only around one-in-ten Americans age 65 and older used social media.

source: http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/01/12/evolution-of-technology/

Roughly three-quarters of Americans (77%) now own a smartphone,

  • with lower-income Americans and those ages 50 and older exhibiting a sharp uptick in ownership over the past year, according a Pew Research Center survey conducted in November 2016.
  • Smartphone adoption has more than doubled since the Center began surveying on this topic in 2011: That year, 35% of Americans reported that they owned a smartphone of some kind.

  • Smartphones are nearly ubiquitous among younger adults, with 92% of 18- to 29-year-olds owning one.

  • But growth in smartphone ownership over the past year has been especially pronounced among Americans 50 and older.
  • Nearly three-quarters (74%) of Americans ages 50-64 are now smartphone owners (a 16-percentage-point increase compared with 2015), as are 42% of those 65 and older (up 12 points from 2015).
  • There has also been a 12-point increase in smartphone ownership among households earning less than $30,000 per year: 64% of these lower-income Americans now own a smartphone.

source: http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/01/12/evolution-of-technology/

Record shares of Americans now own smartphones, have home broadband

Patient engagement is an increasingly important component of strategies to reform health care.

  • In this article we review the available evidence of the contribution that patient activation—the skills and confidence that equip patients to become actively engaged in their health care—makes to health outcomes, costs, and patient experience.
  • There is a growing body of evidence showing that patients who are more activated have better health outcomes and care experiences, but there is limited evidence to date about the impact on costs.
  • Emerging evidence indicates that interventions that tailor support to the individual’s level of activation, and that build skills and confidence, are effective in increasing patient activation. Furthermore, patients who start at the lowest activation levels tend to increase the most.
  • We conclude that policies and interventions aimed at strengthening patients’ role in managing their health care can contribute to improved outcomes and that patient activation can—and should—be measured as an intermediate outcome of care that is linked to improved outcomes.

source: https://www.healthaffairs.org/doi/full/10.1377/hlthaff.2012.1061

Objections:

what objections and excuses are people in your audience likely to have? What are sticking points that would keep them from making a purchase?

Obstacles And Barriers

  • If clinicians’ attitudes sometimes stand in the way of patient engagement, so, too, can patients’ tendencies.
  • Roseanna Sommers and coauthors explore the willingness of focus groups of patients to engage in discussions with clinicians about the costs of nearly comparable care options.
  • Focus-group members’ reactions ranged from delusion to denial. Patients revealed a widespread belief that more expensive care is always better, and even a sense that getting costly care was “payback” for being gouged by health insurers.
  • Most of all, they abhorred the thought that doctors should ever talk about costs. Shifting public attitudes to having reasonable discussions about health costs clearly has a considerable way to go.
  • We are grateful to the organizations whose support made this issue possible: the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, and the California HealthCare Foundation.

source: https://www.healthaffairs.org/doi/full/10.1377/hlthaff.2013.0037

Conclusion

  • The results of this review demonstrate that knowledge gaps exist regarding patient engagement in the inpatient setting. Much work remains to be done in this area. As Henwood et al33 noted, ‘the informed patient will not emerge naturally or easily within existing structures and relationships’.
  • Future studies should focus on identifying optimal methods for engaging patients and rigorously examining the impact of these methods on the healthcare delivery process. Specifically, there is a clear need for both methodological and practical research on inpatient engagement that addresses health outcomes and cost-effectiveness.

source: https://academic.oup.com/jamia/article/21/4/742/763163

Actions doctors can take

  • While some patients may incorrectly blame doctors for a misdiagnosis, this appears to a very small minority. The large majority of patients are eager to compliment their doctors.
  • Complaints could largely be eliminated by medical practices if they implemented the following measures.

source: https://vanguardcommunications.net/patient-complaints/

Better communication:

  • Practices must keep their patients informed. Patients can tolerate surprising medical results, but they do not tolerate surprises elsewhere (long wait times, difficulty booking appointments, difficulty obtaining test results).
  • Keep your patients informed! If wait times are going to be above 15 minutes, let the patient know. Doctors should ask the patient if all questions have been answered or if there is anything more they can do for them. Staff should do the same.

Better organization:

  • Find the most organized individual you can and hire them. You need to have someone on your team who can ensure things are kept in order so that when patients ask questions, you can spend your time answering them rather than hunting for the answer.
  • While long wait times may be unavoidable at times, better communication and organization can minimize this complaint. Automatic appointment reminders and online scheduling may help reduce large variations in daily patient load.

  • Better disposition: Cheerful and empathetic staff can help ensure patients feel as comfortable as possible. While a great team can’t solve all problems, it can help a good practice become great.

source: https://vanguardcommunications.net/patient-complaints/

Online Complaints? Blame Customer Service, Not Doctors’ Care

  • A nationwide study has uncovered what drives patients to write glowing, or scathing, reviews on the Internet. For a study of online doctor reviews coast to coast, Vanguard Communications developed special software to analyze Google+ reviews of doctors, group medical practices, clinics and hospitals.

  • The software analyzed 34,748 patients’ reviews of their physicians throughout the United States and determined that customer service is the leading distinction between highly rated and poorly rated doctors.

  • After compiling data containing the words patients used in describing their experiences with medical practices, the software determined the most common phrases associated with each review star level. An analysis of these most common phrases revealed that an incredible 96 percent of patient complaints are customer-service related, while a mere 4 percent complain about quality of care or misdiagnosis.

source: https://vanguardcommunications.net/patient-complaints/

Best Headlines from FaceBook P.M.

After several campaigns for Practice Managers, these 12 headlines did the best.

01 Improve Patient Engagement to Drive Strategic Priorities
02 Manage Improvement Across the Care Continuum
03 Medical Admin. Must Devote Time and Resources to Strategic Planning Process
04 Medical Office Practice Manager
05 Medical Practice Consulting
06 Medical Marketing Consulting
07 Patient Engagement Leads to Better Outcomes
08 Patient Engagement Technology
09 Physician Quality = Medicare Reimbursements = Patient Satisfaction Scores
010 Revenue Cycle Health Through Increased Patient Engagement
011 We Are Talking About Engaging You Clients With Video
012 Practice Manager Jobs

Locating Practice Managers (PM) online

to listen and watch them for Q&A, problems and thoughts

LinkedIn

  • Seach for “Practice Manager” “Medical Practice”

Locations

  • Greater New York City Area

Obstacles And BarriersIf clinicians’ attitudes sometimes stand in the way of patient engagement, so, too, can patients’ tendencies. Roseanna Sommers and coauthors explore the willingness of focus groups of patients to engage in discussions with clinicians about the costs of nearly comparable care options. Focus-group members’ reactions ranged from delusion to denial. Patients revealed a widespread belief that more expensive care is always better, and even a sense that getting costly care was “payback” for being gouged by health insurers. Most of all, they abhorred the thought that doctors should ever talk about costs. Shifting public attitudes to having reasonable discussions about health costs clearly has a considerable way to go.We are grateful to the organizations whose support made this issue possible: the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, and the California HealthCare Foundation.

Practice Manager’s Pain Points

The business of the physician practice is changing dramatically because of IT. Internal software for business management, the integration to EMR, and the social network dynamic of the patient experience.

Not our Problem

We are not going to discuss the business of the facility, nor the EMR transition of the facility. Nor the massive issue of the personnel turnover.

Employee Turnover

In 2015, employee turnover in healthcare reached 19.2 percent, and 37 percent of clinical and non-clinical healthcare workers plan to leave their current jobs over the next two years. A staggering 69 percent plan to leave their current job within five years!

Independence vs. Employment

Some doctors will choose independence and running their own practice over employment for as long as they possibly can. Some even go into direct primary care, where they forego payer contracts, in order to remain independent.

Payer Control (and the Importance of Documenting Everything)

The increasing influence of third-party payers over physician and patient choices in medical care is a serious pain point for many medical practices.

Healthcare Affordability

In order for the medical profession to maintain its key role in healthcare reform (reform that will happen whether physicians are onboard or not), medical providers will have no choice but to address the huge issue of healthcare affordability.

Coping with Liability

The good news is that between 2009 and 2014, median annual premiums for family practice physicians have fallen by 5.8 percent, and premiums for physicians specializing in internal medicine have fallen by 11.7 percent.

Patient Compliance

As if Medicare rules weren’t enough to cause physician practices to take cost into greater consideration, there’s the plain fact that affordability is a huge factor in whether or not patients comply with doctor recommendations.

Increasing Patient Demands

The physician-patient relationship has changed significantly over the past generation. No longer is the physician the sole receptacle of medical knowledge. Today, information is a commodity that is available to everyone, physician and patient alike.

The Patient Experience

A leading indicator of the patient’s satisfaction is HCAHPS scores

Patients react online

  • Social Networks - personal posts
  • Social Networks - facility posts
  • Website rating

Patient Engagement

What experiences build on the patient’s engagement both in and out of the facility

Patient Search Online

  • A majority of patients research online. Google and YouTube are the first searches. Does it not pay to have real estate on those platforms?
  • Patients reach out to their families and friends on Social Networks. Does it not make sense that the facility control the narrative via their pages?

The Upside for the Practice

What Pain Points are reduced by the Patient engaged with their physician/practice?

Relief comes as

  • Less missed appointments
  • Better patient compliance
  • Payments on time
  • Lower malpractice libility
  • Patient satisfaction Scores
  1. Patient Satisfaction
    Naturally, physicians want their patients to be satisfied. Satisfied patients come back, and they’re likelier to comply with care recommendations. At the same time, Medicare, Medicaid and private insurers are placing increased emphasis on patient satisfaction scores, with real financial consequences for providers when those scores drop.
    source:

Medical Practice Story

Searching some angles to get a handle on Practice Managers “Patient-centric” nightmares

Improving Office Practice: Working Smarter, Not Harder

Christine A. Sinsky, MD
Fam Pract Manag. 2006 Nov-Dec;13(10):28-34.

Copyright © 2019 American Academy of Family Physicians.

https://www.aafp.org/fpm/2006/1100/p28.html

Pre-appointment patient questionnaires.

  • Patients complete a pre-appointment questionnaire with each visit. This helps me understand the breadth of the patient’s concerns and cues me to the patient’s primary agenda so I can plan the visit.
  • It also provides a mechanism for updating the family and social history and completing the review of systems.
  • Finally, it helps me focus on my patients. Because the patients have often written down their story, I don’t have to break eye contact to take lengthy notes.

Copyright © 2019 American Academy of Family Physicians.
Improving Office Practice: Working Smarter, Not Harder
https://www.aafp.org/fpm/2006/1100/p28.html

Empowered nurses.

  • My nurses and I are partners. They play an active role in our practice. * The more informed and engaged they are, the smoother the practice operates
  • Our practice uses standing orders that allow the nurses to update immunizations, take independent initiative for patient education and perform symptom-appropriate office procedure

Physician preparation.

  • I find it useful to know the purpose of the visit and the scope of the patient’s concerns and to review the data before the appointment.
  • This allows me to formulate a tentative plan before I enter the exam room and makes it less likely that some aspect of care will fall through the cracks.
  • Spending a few minutes reviewing the chart and patient questionnaire and discussing the patient with the nurse pays off with a more efficient, focused visit.

Improved interactions.

  • Some basic interpersonal skills can go a long way toward improving the doctor-patient interaction.
  • To begin, I try to make eye contact with the patient as I enter the room.
  • I shake hands on entry and again at the conclusion of the encounter. I stand shoulder to shoulder

This is perfect intro to an OMG does this work for engagement, why not have the patient enagaed before they meet the doc.

OMG
I often find it helpful to ask patients, “What else do I need to know?” This has not been the open-ended nightmare I thought it might be. Instead, it is often a rich source of pertinent information. I also ask, “What else is going on in your life?” to develop context. I learn about the patient as a person. I’ll often follow up with, “Could you bring a picture of __ to your next appointment?” This gives patients a chance to share the pleasure of their grandchildren, their travel adventures and other unique interests, and it enriches my life as well.

The annual exam as an organizing structure.

  • I structure much of my practice around the annual exam.
  • This is when I address prevention, coach patients on healthy lifestyles and perform the annual review of each chronic medical condition. Invariably, patients bring new symptoms for evaluation as well.
  • The annual exam is a complex visit, focused on integrated, longitudinal care.

Adding it all up

  • Improving office practice is a worthwhile endeavor. Even in the face of complex coding rules, practice guidelines and performance demands, physicians who develop an organized system of information management and workflow and who foster an empowered nursing staff can achieve a productive and satisfying model of practice for patients, staff and themselves.
  • Implementing any of the strategies described here can improve efficiency, but together they can transform your practice.

9 Considerations for Medical

Practice Success

How successful is your medical practice?
By Joy Hicks
Updated June 22, 2017

Ⓒ 2019 About, Inc. (Dotdash) — All rights reserved

https://www.verywellhealth.com/measuring-your-medical-practice-success-4121199

Customer Service & Patient Satisfaction

  • Standards of practice for patient satisfaction addresses every aspect of patient interaction and impact, including such issues as telephone etiquette, patient greetings, and check out procedures as well as notifications and scheduling.
  • When an office has clear standards and expectations the likelihood of error or misunderstanding is greatly decreased and patient satisfaction is largely increased.

Providing high-quality care and excellent customer service

  • will prevent loss of revenue for the medical office due to a high level of patient satisfaction.
  • Patients will very likely continue to come back as long as they are satisfied with the entire process.

  • So how do you find out how patients perceive the process of your medical office?

    • Develop and distribute Patient Satisfaction Surveys
    • Sit in the waiting area and observe what goes on from that point of view
    • Put yourself through the entire process
    • Talk to your staff and find out what problems they may be aware of

Key Performance

Accounts receivables:

The accounts receivable, or AR, report is designed to analyze the financial health of the medical office. Using the discharge date of the patient account, the AR report calculates the length of time it takes for medical claims to get paid.

Denials:

Denial resolution is necessary in achieving financial goals. One important way to improve cash flow in the medical office is to track denials by calculating denial rates.

Collections:

Collection rates help the medical office determine how successful the office is in collecting receivables. This rate tells a lot about the financial performance of the medical office. If you want to know how effective at collecting receivables then calculating collection rate is important.

Safety

  • Patient Safety and QualityPatient safety refers to methods to prevent harm to patients. Patient safety practices in the areas of medical errors, fall prevention, infection control, and medication management are essential to reducing the risk of adverse events and preventable injuries.
  • Quality and safety are linked together in terms of standards of care. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) identifies quality of care as “safe, effective, patient-centered, timely, efficient, and equitable”.

Financial Goals

  • Rising Operating Costs: Decreasing physician payments, fewer patients, and high technology costs can be financially crippling. The best way to handle rising operating costs is to monitor them and then develop a plan to cut costs. Three areas that can add up to thousands of dollars in savings per year include office supplies, medical supplies, and office equipment.
  • Collecting Patient Payments: In recent years, the entire health care industry has become more aggressive in their collection practices. With the ever-rising costs associated with health care, it is extremely important to the livelihood of any facility to get the maximum reimbursement which largely relies on patient payments.

Medical Staff Performance

  • The performance of the medical office is highly based on the individual performance of the medical office staff. This makes measuring medical staff performance by way of individual evaluations critical for achieving higher levels of excellence.
  • Motivation: Encouraging employees to achieve satisfactory performance or perform at a higher standard. A motivated employee is one that feels a sense of pride in what they do every day. Knowing and understanding how an individual contributes to the success of the medical office is a great motivator for improving performance.

Marketing Strategies for the Medical Office

By Joy Hicks
Updated July 21, 2017

Marketing your medical practice requires someone that can be realistic about market expectations, setting and accomplishing goals, and assessing the competition. Marketing identifies the types of services that should be offered based on the demands of the community, analyze the performance potential, and develops strategies and goals necessary to maintain a competitive edge.​

Ⓒ 2019 About, Inc. (Dotdash) — All rights reserved - Vertwell Health
https://www.verywellhealth.com/medical-office-marketing-strategies-2317559

Online Marketing

  • Online marketing is one of the most important applications for developing and maintaining a growing customer base. Having a positive online presence is one of the most productive measures in marketing, second only to word of mouth. When implementing your online marketing strategy, it is more effective to focus your time and energy on building a successful website and a dynamic social media presence.

Website

A medical office website should be more than just a single page listing the practice’s office hours and contact information. The website should be full of information that patients can read informative articles and find information on treatment options, new technology, or other information related to health care. Since first impressions have the greatest impact make sure your website is:

  • Professional
  • Appealing
  • User-Friendly
  • Informative
  • Memorable

Social Media

The use of social media for the purpose of online communications is recognized as an effective way to promote community relations, recruitment activities, and marketing events.

  • Of course, medical office staff must fully understand the appropriate use of social media. Creating a social media policy for medical office staff establishes guidelines to protect patient privacy and prevents the violation of HIPAA Privacy Rules.
  • Here are some simple social media guidelines for the entire medical office staff to follow:

Do
…be professional especially if you have identified yourself as an employee
…include a statement stating your views are your own and not your employers
…remove tags on pictures that a patient posts to keep the picture off of your page

Don’t
…participate in any online communication with patients of the medical office
…post pictures of patients under any circumstance even if it is unidentifiable
…discuss any details of your job or activities that occurred during the work day

Offline Marketing

  • Offline marketing, or traditional marketing, should always be included in the medical office marketing plan. Although many patients are using the internet to find a new practice or reconnect with an old one, traditional marketing is still an effective approach to reaching out to patients.

Advertising

  • The right mix of various tools is necessary for a successful advertising campaign. Depending on a number of factors, such as the demographics of the target market, your marketing plan, and your advertising budget, your advertising strategy could include:

  • Brochures

  • Direct Mail
  • Newsletters
  • Television
  • Radio
  • Billboards
  • Signage

Special Events

  • Creating special events is a great way to engage the community and encourage people to become new patients. Special events can draw large crowds, media coverage and attention from leaders within the community. Consider offering free cholesterol or diabetic screenings, celebrating milestone events, or introducing new physicians to the community.

Referral Marketing

  • Although online and traditional marketing can generate a substantial amount of business, referrals are important for the medical office to have long-term financial success. Referrals can come from several places but it is necessary to build, develop and maintain great relationships with other providers for this to be successful.
  • This is especially true for specialized medical practices. Most patients don’t seek out specialists but are referred by other physicians and hospitals. When providers develop relationships that drive patients to each other, these relationships are for the mutual benefit of one another.

How to improve the patient experience, part 1: pre-visit

  • To build patient retention, you need to pay careful attention to the entire patient experience. Check out how you can improve patients’ pre-visit impressions of your practice.
  • Most providers today recognize the patient experience extends beyond the exam room. In fact, the patient experience begins before a person is even a patient — it begins the moment they start their search for a doctor like you.

  • The information your practice puts forth online effects patient experience. So does how your practice communicates with people once they’ve booked — if your practice communicates at all, that is. In fact, there are a million little things that contribute to how patients view your practice before they ever step foot through your doors.

  • Here, we examine two ways you can make a great first impression to convince prospective patients to book appointments. We also discuss two ways you can positively affect patient experience before their scheduled arrival, ultimately helping you persuade them to come again.

PatientPop
May 29, 2018

© Copyright 2019 PatientPop, Inc.
https://www.patientpop.com/blog/running-a-practice/patient-experience/improve-patient-experience-part-1-pre-visit/

Create a Helpful Online Presence

  • More than 72 percent of Americans begin their search for healthcare providers online.
  • Understanding where and how you appear online, especially in comparison to other providers in your area, is essential for successful patient marketing.

  • If you search for your specialty and location using Google, does your practice website appear at the top of results?

  • Do any of your healthcare and business directories show up? If they do, does each listing contain information about your background and services?
  • Can you be found on social media sites? Do you share information patients want to see?
  • A helpful online presence is one that provides clear and consistent information. Any site where patients can find you should include your phone number, address, photos, and services.

  • Digitally savvy patients are also turning to social media for more information, similar to how they use a search engine.

  • They use social media profiles to assure themselves that your practice is legitimate and offers their needed services. Being active on sites like Facebook and Twitter gives you greater control over sharing your practice’s information while connecting with your patient base.

Design Your Website With Patients in Mind

  • Patients are in search of resources that will give them a sense of what their experience at your practice might be like. Making important information about your practice easily accessible will build trust with prospective patients and increase the chance they refer back to your website again and again.

  • This can be done with a thoughtful biography, by providing answers to frequently asked questions, and by clearly listing hours of operation, accepted insurance, and services — and sometimes even including prices.

  • A website is even better if patients can conveniently schedule appointments at any time, instead of having to call during business hours. (PatientPop research shows 42 percent of patients prefer to use online scheduling, rather than the telephone.)

4 Ways to Empower Patients at Your Healthcare Practice

  • How providers can help guide their patients toward a more active role in their care.

It’s no secret that healthcare is changing rapidly. New technology, payment models, and shifting government regulations can be hard to keep straight. At the center of all this change remains the relationship between a doctor and a patient — but even that is changing.

A 2016 study of nearly 1,800 people that examined what patients want most from their healthcare experience found that 75% of patients want a more personalized relationship with their providers, and 60% of patients want more affordable and transparent pricing. The study also revealed that convenience and digital tools were major patient priorities.

These desires can’t just be chalked up to those darn Millennials, either, as the study was a representation of the U.S. demographics as a whole. The need, therefore, to understand and react to these changing priorities is crucial for any healthcare practice looking for continued patient acquisition and success.

Here are four strategies healthcare practices can use to meet changing patient desires, empower them to take a more active role in their own care (a crucial capability for succeeding under value-based contracts), and increase their patient retention.

https://www.patientpop.com/blog/running-a-practice/patient-experience/4-ways-empower-patients-healthcare-practice/

Embrace the Benefits of the Web

  • A website that is easy to find through search is the foundation for any practice to constantly engage and empower patients. At this point it’s basically table stakes for any practice looking to take things to the next level. It’s a place to build trust with patients outside the exam room through a patient portal, resource libraries, and more.

  • The web is the place where you can constantly engage your patients to take their health more seriously. Do that, and you can be assured that your patients will begin to feel that sense of a more personalized relationship develop, which can lead to higher patient retention.

Outcome - Inherent Value

Security

Humans want to feel safe and secure, both in the moment and in the longer term.

  • Safety
  • Strength
  • A Loyal Tribe

Status

Human beings are highly concerned with their status and with hierarchies in social groups. Status is an interesting desire because so many different things can convey so many different forms of status,
in different cultures, sub-cultures and contexts.

  • Validation
  • Success

Purpose

Humans thirst for a sense of purpose. Once our basic needs are met, we quickly look to be part of
something greater than ourselves.

  • Contribution
  • Legacy
  • Honor

Power

Humans strive for power, in many ways and in many different forms. The more power we have, the more easily we can take care of most of our other desires.

  • Influence
  • Knowledge
  • Control

Novelty

When a human’s needs are met and everything is going well, that human will quickly get bored…

  • Curiosity
  • Adventure
  • Creative Expression

Outcome - Building Content Engagments™

a course that leads the customer to a clear and highly desirable outcome is more valuable.

PreOp® Credibility

Read our 26k comments
a course that is more credible is more valuable. Making a big promise only makes a course more valuable and more sellable if your customers also believe that you can deliver the outcome you promise.

Over 20 thousand comments

https://info.preop.com/Proof

1 million online views per month*

*On average 2018/19

23 years, serviced +1200 hospitals, and a leader in bedside Tv patient education

Specificity - Built for Marketing associates

a course with a more specific premise, made for a more narrowly targeted group of people is more valuable.

Product Type - Beyond course receive consultation

certain kinds of products are more valuable than others. An online course is generally seen as more valuable than a book, for example.

Uniqueness - You get Videos

only a unique product can command a high price. A course that has a clearer and stronger differentiation from other courses and products in the market is more valuable.

Order your Videos

The whole process works by offering 3 videos (2 standard and 1 client choice)

Order Form

Use the PreOp® Order form (less PostCare™) this way we can start them off at the $9.99 per month

Urology Order From

Let’s begin promoting to Urology Practices - https://mkt.preop.com/urology-order-form/

Offer of Free Videos

The two videos that come along with the Course

Handwashing

Offer the short description of the video

Wound Care

Offer the short description of the video

Send your logo or branding

It’s important that we brand each video for the client protecting their investment;as well as MSE assets

Branding Dimensions

Try to maintain a square 1:1 format ratio. Other options are lower 1/3 titles (facility name, Physician’s name, address and phone number, website and email

Sign off on Video Bug Placement

Most import to get a positive relationship is to offer:

  • Client directorial control of the process.
  • Client ownership of the videos
  • Process of Licensing the videos

Send 1 Video with Branding

Using email, document agreement of placement.

Send 3 Video titles JWPlayer

Using JWPlayer, create a client playlist with videos of choice. Use this means for adding more licensed videos. As well as, an Upsell to a Custom JWPlayer Account

YouTube

We begin to introduce the client to the Module of YouTube

How to add a Manager

If the client has a YouTube Channel, we want them to add CMTv as a Manager

Cmtv Uploads branded video

This includes:

  • Title, Description, Tags
  • Poster frame
  • VSEO
  • GEOIP of Client

How to create a YouTube Channel

If the client has not a Youtube Channel, we want to direct them to the “Create a YouTube Channel”

VSEO Video Search Engine Optimization

Facebook

Ad Campaigns, from audience building, ad creation to managing buy and analytics

Ad Campaigns features and benefits

Low cost ad campaigns since the video ads are near free as part of your PreOp® Videos. Video ads are the lowest cost and offer the highest return.
*On average a 3-second video watch will cost 3-5 cents. Remarketing to those views is available up to 300 days.

Instagram