• #**Dimensions of Growth**

  • 1. Project Design

    Aligned to the concept of “Content with Legitimacy,” within Barab, Gresalfi, and Ingram-Goble’s (2010) framework of Transformational Play, this dimension of growth reflects the participant’s demonstrated ability to design Project-Based learning experiences reflective of the following components:

    • Purposeful Framing
    • Practical Utility
    • Process-Guidance
    • Learning Trajectory, and
    • Technology-Leveraging

    A major part of the participant’s progress in PBA understanding would be tied into this dimension, which would require recursive revisitation and refinement as other dimensions of competencies are expanded and improved.

  • 2. Student Agency

    Tied to the Transformational Play concept of “Choice with Agency,” this dimension of growth reflects the participant’s demonstrated ability to design Project-Based learning experiences that maximize the agency of students not just as passive participants, but legitimate agents of change that can, through meaningful choices, make an impact not only the end-product, presentation, or final evaluation, but also in the directions of inquiry that the student or team might explore. This dimension includes the participant’s demonstrated ability to design cycles of feedback that foster this sense of agency within students, including, but not limited to, points of assessment of individual or team growth as the project progresses.

  • 3. Instructional Engagement

    Linked to the concept of “Context with Consequentiality,” this dimension of growth reflects the participant’s role in creating an instructional context that shapes, and in turn is shaped by, the identities of its participants. Traditionally discussed as “instructional strategies,” this dimension expands as participants improve their ability to modify and adjust teaching to match ever-evolving student understandings and leverage knowledge to maximize the impact of Project-Based learning experience on student growth.

  • 4. Collaborative Facilitation

    Drawing from the concept of “Community with Reciprocity,” this dimension of reflects the participant’s demonstrated ability to foster genuine collaboration between students and the ever-expanding community of others around them: the immediate members of their project team, their class- and school-mates, and individuals or groups outside of their immediate community. As participants grow in this dimension, they improve in their ability to plan opportunities for student small-group collaboration, model crucial collaboration practices, and connect students with external audiences and collaborators.

  • 5. Assessment Integration

    Rooted in the concept of “Person with Intent,” this dimension of reflects the participant’s demonstrated ability to design and implement instances of assessment that shape students’ attention to (1) the Project-Based learning experience, (2) the conceptual tools required to successfully participate in that experience, (3) their own competencies as engaged and purposeful learners moving in a trajectory toward their own aspirational identities. This dimension expands with the participants’ leveraging of instances of formal and informal assessment, quality of feedback, alignment to standards, and inclusion of students in co-creation or co-negotiation of assessments and evaluations.

  • Potential Indicators

  • 1. Purposeful Framing

    To what degree is the purpose of the project framed for students such that they understand their role as legitimate participants in addressing an authentic, driving, or impactful issue that has real-world relevance and is tied to students’ backgrounds, interests, or lived experiences?

    Considerations:

    • Authenticity of problem
    • Legitimacy (Crucial Change-Agent vs. Passive Bystander)
    • Pressing / driving / impactful issue
    • Tied to student interests/backgrounds
    • Real-World Relevance

    2. Practical Utility

    To what degree students be acquiring knowledge, skills, and dispositions through this experience that will have?

    3. Process-Guidance

    How well-designed is the process for guiding students through the various phases of the project?

    Considerations:

    • Conceptualizing/Framing
    • Question-Generation
    • Inquiry/Exploration
    • Product/Artifact Creation
    • Presentation

    4. Learning Trajectory

    How well does the project fit into the larger design of the student’s learning journey, whether dictated by a formal curriculum or independently co-constructed with the student?

    5. Technology-Leveraging

    To what degree does the project design make use of existing and emerging technologies to maximize opportunities for student learning, collaboration, and growth?

  • 1. Opportunities to Develop Student Self-Management Skills

    2. Meaningful Choice in Project Components

    3. Assessment of Individual Growth

    4. Investigative Decision-Making

    5. Encouragement of Divergent Thinking

  • 1. Formally-Planned Lessons

    2. Informal Opportunities for Instruction

    3. Anticipation of Misconceptions

    4. Instructional Questioning Strategies

    5. Responsiveness to Student Experience

  • 1. Planned opportunities for small-group collaboration

    To what degree does the participant include planned and formal opportunities for small-group collaboration?

    2. Skill and Habit Development

    To what degree does the participant foster collaborative skills and behaviors in students through lessons, demonstrations, and activities?

    3. Classroom Accountability

    4. External Collaborations

    5. Community Interdependence

  • 1. Planned Instances of Formal Assessment

    2. Identified opportunities for Informal Assessment

    3. Constructive, Quality of Feedback / Leverage/Usability by Students

    (How much info is given, about what, actionable steps, etc.)

    4. Student participation in co-creation of assessments

    5. Curricular/Standards Alignment

    To what degree are project assessments tied to helping students meet students to meet established standards, critical competencies, or personal learning aspirations?

    Considerations:

    • Established (State,National, International) Standards
    • 21st Century Skills
    • Career- and College-Readiness
    • Student Growth Objectives
    • Aspirational Identities of Students
  • In your classroom how often do you anticipate you will…

    …design learning experiences that reflect contemporary societal concerns?
    …provide a set procedure for working through a problem?
    …develop skills that students can readily see as having an impact on their current and future endeavors?
    …address issues tied to their interests, backgrounds, or current experiences?
    …work through textbook-provided problems to get all students reach a similar conclusion?

  • In your classroom how often do you anticipate students will…

    …assess their own progress through a particular learning experience?
    …design and implement their own investigations?
    …develop their own processes for managing their time and productivity?
    …approach a single problem from multiple perspectives?
    …work through textbook provided problems to reach a similar conclusion?

  • In your classroom how often do you anticipate you will…

    …introduce content through formal presentations
    …ask questions that have a definitively ‘correct’ answer
    …encourage students to consider alternative explanations
    …privately confer with students to address misconceptions or misunderstandings
    …change the current course of your instruction to more directly address student concerns?

  • In your classroom how often do you anticipate students will…

    …be asked to explain concepts to one another
    …engage in active “team-building” style activities
    …read and comment on one another’s work
    …present their work to an audience outside the classroom?
    …create community standards to hold one another accountable within a class?

  • In your classroom how often do you anticipate you will…

    …schedule instances of formal assessment?
    …take notes about informal observations of student learning?
    …provide written comments on student work?
    …allow students choice in how they will be assessed?
    …design assessments that are tied to national standards?

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Project Design\nAligned to the concept of \"Content with Legitimacy,\" within Barab, Gresalfi, and Ingram-Goble's (2010) framework of Transformational Play, this dimension of growth reflects the participant's demonstrated ability to design Project-Based learning experiences reflective of the following components:\n* Purposeful Framing\n* Practical Utility\n* Process-Guidance\n* Learning Trajectory, and\n* Technology-Leveraging\n\nA major part of the participant's progress in PBA understanding would be tied into this dimension, which would require recursive revisitation and refinement as other dimensions of competencies are expanded and improved."},{"_id":"48073ddc7490a22d6f000042","treeId":"53f264c5500b17af1e3fe6d1","seq":581137,"position":1,"parentId":"53f264c5500b17af1e3fe6da","content":"###1. Purposeful Framing\n####To what degree is the purpose of the project framed for students such that they understand their role as legitimate participants in addressing an authentic, driving, or impactful issue that has real-world relevance and is tied to students' backgrounds, interests, or lived experiences?\n####Considerations:\n- Authenticity of problem\n- Legitimacy (Crucial Change-Agent vs. Passive Bystander)\n- Pressing / driving / impactful issue\n- Tied to student interests/backgrounds\n- Real-World Relevance\n\n\n###2. Practical Utility \n####To what degree students be acquiring knowledge, skills, and dispositions through this experience that will have?\n\n\n###3. Process-Guidance \n####How well-designed is the process for guiding students through the various phases of the project?\n####Considerations:\n* Conceptualizing/Framing\n* Question-Generation\n* Inquiry/Exploration\n* Product/Artifact Creation\n* Presentation\n\n\n###4. Learning Trajectory\n####How well does the project fit into the larger design of the student's learning journey, whether dictated by a formal curriculum or independently co-constructed with the student?\n\n \n\n\n\n###5. Technology-Leveraging\n####To what degree does the project design make use of existing and emerging technologies to maximize opportunities for student learning, collaboration, and growth?"},{"_id":"48285dc0f64bf2d4cc00005e","treeId":"53f264c5500b17af1e3fe6d1","seq":555529,"position":1,"parentId":"48073ddc7490a22d6f000042","content":"####In your classroom how often do you anticipate you will...\n...design learning experiences that reflect contemporary societal concerns?\n...provide a set procedure for working through a problem?\n...develop skills that students can readily see as having an impact on their current and future endeavors?\n...address issues tied to their interests, backgrounds, or current experiences?\n...work through textbook-provided problems to get all students reach a similar conclusion?"},{"_id":"48073d597490a22d6f000041","treeId":"53f264c5500b17af1e3fe6d1","seq":555711,"position":3,"parentId":null,"content":"##2. Student Agency\nTied to the Transformational Play concept of “Choice with Agency,” this dimension of growth reflects the participant’s demonstrated ability to design Project-Based learning experiences that maximize the agency of students not just as passive participants, but legitimate agents of change that can, through meaningful choices, make an impact not only the end-product, presentation, or final evaluation, but also in the directions of inquiry that the student or team might explore. This dimension includes the participant's demonstrated ability to design cycles of feedback that foster this sense of agency within students, including, but not limited to, points of assessment of individual or team growth as the project progresses."},{"_id":"480764957490a22d6f00004d","treeId":"53f264c5500b17af1e3fe6d1","seq":555708,"position":1,"parentId":"48073d597490a22d6f000041","content":"###1. Opportunities to Develop Student Self-Management Skills\n###2. Meaningful Choice in Project Components\n###3. Assessment of Individual Growth\n###4. Investigative Decision-Making\n###5. Encouragement of Divergent Thinking\n\n"},{"_id":"4828792ef64bf2d4cc00005f","treeId":"53f264c5500b17af1e3fe6d1","seq":555709,"position":1,"parentId":"480764957490a22d6f00004d","content":"####In your classroom how often do you anticipate students will...\n...assess their own progress through a particular learning experience?\n...design and implement their own investigations?\n...develop their own processes for managing their time and productivity?\n...approach a single problem from multiple perspectives?\n...work through textbook provided problems to reach a similar conclusion?"},{"_id":"48074bd57490a22d6f000047","treeId":"53f264c5500b17af1e3fe6d1","seq":555713,"position":4,"parentId":null,"content":"##3. Instructional Engagement \nLinked to the concept of \"Context with Consequentiality,\" this dimension of growth reflects the participant's role in creating an instructional context that shapes, and in turn is shaped by, the identities of its participants. Traditionally discussed as \"instructional strategies,\" this dimension expands as participants improve their ability to modify and adjust teaching to match ever-evolving student understandings and leverage knowledge to maximize the impact of Project-Based learning experience on student growth."},{"_id":"480756d17490a22d6f00004b","treeId":"53f264c5500b17af1e3fe6d1","seq":555666,"position":1,"parentId":"48074bd57490a22d6f000047","content":"###1. Formally-Planned Lessons\n###2. Informal Opportunities for Instruction \n###3. Anticipation of Misconceptions\n###4. Instructional Questioning Strategies\n###5. Responsiveness to Student Experience\n"},{"_id":"4828b3ebf64bf2d4cc000060","treeId":"53f264c5500b17af1e3fe6d1","seq":555636,"position":1,"parentId":"480756d17490a22d6f00004b","content":"####In your classroom how often do you anticipate you will...\n...introduce content through formal presentations\n...ask questions that have a definitively 'correct' answer\n...encourage students to consider alternative explanations\n...privately confer with students to address misconceptions or misunderstandings\n...change the current course of your instruction to more directly address student concerns?"},{"_id":"48074cac7490a22d6f000049","treeId":"53f264c5500b17af1e3fe6d1","seq":555714,"position":6,"parentId":null,"content":"##4. Collaborative Facilitation\nDrawing from the concept of \"Community with Reciprocity,\" this dimension of reflects the participant's demonstrated ability to foster genuine collaboration between students and the ever-expanding community of others around them: the immediate members of their project team, their class- and school-mates, and individuals or groups outside of their immediate community. As participants grow in this dimension, they improve in their ability to plan opportunities for student small-group collaboration, model crucial collaboration practices, and connect students with external audiences and collaborators.\n"},{"_id":"480768cc7490a22d6f000052","treeId":"53f264c5500b17af1e3fe6d1","seq":555702,"position":1,"parentId":"48074cac7490a22d6f000049","content":"\n\n###1. Planned opportunities for small-group collaboration\n####To what degree does the participant include planned and formal opportunities for small-group collaboration?\n### 2. Skill and Habit Development\n#### To what degree does the participant foster collaborative skills and behaviors in students through lessons, demonstrations, and activities?\n###3. Classroom Accountability\n###4. External Collaborations\n###5. Community Interdependence\n \n"},{"_id":"4828bb2af64bf2d4cc000061","treeId":"53f264c5500b17af1e3fe6d1","seq":555727,"position":1,"parentId":"480768cc7490a22d6f000052","content":"####In your classroom how often do you anticipate students will...\n...be asked to explain concepts to one another\n...engage in active \"team-building\" style activities\n...read and comment on one another's work\n...present their work to an audience outside the classroom?\n...create community standards to hold one another accountable within a class?"},{"_id":"480769007490a22d6f000053","treeId":"53f264c5500b17af1e3fe6d1","seq":555535,"position":2,"parentId":"48074cac7490a22d6f000049","content":""},{"_id":"48074d4f7490a22d6f00004a","treeId":"53f264c5500b17af1e3fe6d1","seq":555737,"position":7,"parentId":null,"content":"##5. Assessment Integration\nRooted in the concept of \"Person with Intent,\" this dimension of reflects the participant's demonstrated ability to design and implement instances of assessment that shape students' attention to (1) the Project-Based learning experience, (2) the conceptual tools required to successfully participate in that experience, (3) their own competencies as engaged and purposeful learners moving in a trajectory toward their own aspirational identities. This dimension expands with the participants' leveraging of instances of formal and informal assessment, quality of feedback, alignment to standards, and inclusion of students in co-creation or co-negotiation of assessments and evaluations."},{"_id":"480775397490a22d6f000055","treeId":"53f264c5500b17af1e3fe6d1","seq":555725,"position":1,"parentId":"48074d4f7490a22d6f00004a","content":"\n###1. Planned Instances of Formal Assessment\n###2. Identified opportunities for Informal Assessment\n###3. Constructive, Quality of Feedback / Leverage/Usability by Students \n(How much info is given, about what, actionable steps, etc.)\n###4. Student participation in co-creation of assessments\n\n###5. Curricular/Standards Alignment\n####To what degree are project assessments tied to helping students meet students to meet established standards, critical competencies, or personal learning aspirations?\n####Considerations:\n* Established (State,National, International) Standards\n* 21st Century Skills\n* Career- and College-Readiness\n* Student Growth Objectives\n* Aspirational Identities of Students\n"},{"_id":"48284b93f64bf2d4cc00005c","treeId":"53f264c5500b17af1e3fe6d1","seq":555729,"position":1,"parentId":"480775397490a22d6f000055","content":"####In your classroom how often do you anticipate you will...\n...schedule instances of formal assessment?\n...take notes about informal observations of student learning?\n...provide written comments on student work?\n...allow students choice in how they will be assessed?\n...design assessments that are tied to national standards?"},{"_id":"48285771f64bf2d4cc00005d","treeId":"53f264c5500b17af1e3fe6d1","seq":555609,"position":1.5,"parentId":"48074d4f7490a22d6f00004a","content":""}],"tree":{"_id":"53f264c5500b17af1e3fe6d1","name":"Professional Growth Indicator (Intel PBA Journey","publicUrl":"professional-growth-indicator-intel-pba-journey"}}