• Holistic progressive writing.

    2.57
  • Easier & better writing: start small, then expand.

    7/7.716
  • To write easily & coherently, start with a micro-version, and progressively expand it. Forces focus on what to say, then how to say it.

    23/23.148
  • To write easily & coherently, start with a 25 word version of your piece. Make sure it feels right & complete. Then write a 75 word version. Keep tripling till you reach your target size.

    This may seem like more work, but even if it were slower, you’re more likely to finish because it’s a staircase to your story.

    This is not unique to writing, and is tied to a beautiful theory.

    69/69.44
  • The problem

    Writing is hard, because of limited mental RAM. If you just write you quickly get lost. If you plan or outline, it’s still a huge leap to a full novel.


    15% - 30/31.25
  • The solution

    Create stairs.

    Divide target word count by three repeatedly till you get to ~5-10 words. Write that.

    Make sure it feels right and complete. Then triple, and write the next pass. Break it up as needed.

    Keep within limits, continue till done.


    20% - 42/41.67
  • The objections

    You may object:

    • More writing! You are only writing 50% more words than your target. Since first drafts run long, you’re writing the same number of words.
    • Slow! You write much faster when you know what to say. Your story has more coherence, and will need less editing.
    • Hard! Not with Gingko, because you can always see your previous version.

    The benefits:

    • Constraints promote creativity. You are constantly thinking “What’s the most important thing I need to say right now”.
    • You’ll actually finish. By building these stairs, it’s much easier to write.
    • You can always stop sooner, and be done.
    • You’ll always have summary versions for reference.

    50% - 103/104.17
  • The theory

    This is nothing new. Painters sketch before painting, sculptors start rough, then refine. If it’s possible, it’s done this way.

    This principle is deep, and has ties to Fourier transforms.


    10% - 30/??

  • Total: 208.33
  • The problem

    I visited the Louvre when I was 16, and the thing I remember most (besides the Mona Lisa mosh pit), was this quiet, dimly-lit room on the second floor, where the sketches and studies were kept.

    It was fascinating to see how the masters would plan out their ouvres. You could see them playing with the composition. Every person was studied, different poses were explored.

    And all with graphite and chalk, on sheets of paper about 1/20th the size of the final grand canvas. Only when they were happy with this stage, would they proceed to sketching directly on the canvas.

    No painter who strives for a complete and detailed whole, would start painting without a plan, starting at the top left corner, and raster along till he gets to the bottom left. It might work for a time, but eventually some angle wouldn’t line up. Perspective would be nearly impossible. The overall composition would poor (or cliched).

    This seems like an obviously bad way of painting, but we do it all the time, when writing.


    20 % - 125 ([X] Too long)
  • The solution

    No one would consider using a ladder to rock climb, and it might be that same feeling that prevents people from using outlines. It feels like cheating.

    But writing is a creative endeavor. To be fulfilled, you must create something complete, and something beautiful to you. This is a phenomenally difficult task, and any tools and help you can get, you should take.

    So how do you climb from 0 words, to 50000?
    Simple: Use stairs. (problem with the anaolgy: says nothing of the completeness at each step).

    If you take your target word count
    [Algorithm]

    [Core principles]

    [Extensions]


    20% - 125
  • Objections

    25%

  • Benefits

    25%

  • 10%

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Keep tripling till you reach your target size.\n\nThis may seem like more work, but *even if* it were slower, you're **more likely to finish** because it's a staircase to your story.\n\nThis is not unique to writing, and is tied to a beautiful theory.\n\n###### 69/69.44"},{"_id":"32579cf978f261541e000112","treeId":"31eeab79a37bf4e41f0000e1","seq":2873498,"position":0.5,"parentId":"3257700178f261541e00010f","content":"## The problem\nWriting is hard, because of limited mental RAM. If you just write you quickly get lost. If you plan or outline, it's still a huge leap to a full novel.\n\n---\n###### 15% - 30/31.25"},{"_id":"3259beda61843bf241000059","treeId":"31eeab79a37bf4e41f0000e1","seq":2873499,"position":1,"parentId":"32579cf978f261541e000112","content":"## The problem\nI visited the Louvre when I was 16, and the thing I remember most (besides the Mona Lisa mosh pit), was this quiet, dimly-lit room on the second floor, where the sketches and studies were kept.\n\nIt was fascinating to see how the masters would plan out their ouvres. You could see them playing with the composition. Every person was studied, different poses were explored.\n\nAnd all with graphite and chalk, on sheets of paper about 1/20th the size of the final grand canvas. Only when they were happy with this stage, would they proceed to sketching directly on the canvas.\n\nNo painter who strives for a complete and detailed whole, would start painting without a plan, starting at the top left corner, and raster along till he gets to the bottom left. It might work for a time, but eventually some angle wouldn't line up. Perspective would be nearly impossible. The overall composition would poor (or cliched).\n\nThis seems like an obviously bad way of painting, but we do it all the time, when writing.\n\n---\n###### 20 % - 125 ([X] Too long)"},{"_id":"3257bc7b78f261541e000117","treeId":"31eeab79a37bf4e41f0000e1","seq":2873497,"position":0.625,"parentId":"3257700178f261541e00010f","content":"## The solution\nCreate stairs.\n\nDivide target word count by three repeatedly till you get to ~5-10 words. Write that.\n\nMake sure it feels right and complete. Then triple, and write the next pass. Break it up as needed.\n\nKeep within limits, continue till done.\n\n---\n###### 20% - 42/41.67"},{"_id":"3259c40061843bf24100005b","treeId":"31eeab79a37bf4e41f0000e1","seq":2873501,"position":1,"parentId":"3257bc7b78f261541e000117","content":"## The solution\nNo one would consider using a ladder to rock climb, and it might be that same feeling that prevents people from using outlines. It feels like cheating.\n\nBut writing is a creative endeavor. To be fulfilled, you must create something complete, and something beautiful to you. This is a phenomenally difficult task, and any tools and help you can get, you should take.\n\nSo how do you climb from 0 words, to 50000?\nSimple: Use stairs. (problem with the anaolgy: says nothing of the completeness at each step).\n\nIf you take your target word count\n[Algorithm]\n\n[Core principles]\n\n[Extensions]\n\n---\n###### 20% - 125"},{"_id":"32579d8178f261541e000114","treeId":"31eeab79a37bf4e41f0000e1","seq":1,"position":0.78125,"parentId":"3257700178f261541e00010f","content":"## The objections\nYou may object:\n\n- More writing! You are only writing 50% more words than your target. Since first drafts run long, you're writing the same number of words.\n- Slow! You write much faster when you know what to say. Your story has more coherence, and will need less editing.\n- Hard! Not with Gingko, because you can always see your previous version.\n\nThe benefits:\n\n- Constraints promote creativity. You are constantly thinking \"What's the most important thing I need to say right now\".\n- You'll actually finish. By building these stairs, it's much easier to write.\n- You can always stop sooner, and be done.\n- You'll always have summary versions for reference.\n\n---\n###### 50% - 103/104.17"},{"_id":"32664260821b067a3500006e","treeId":"31eeab79a37bf4e41f0000e1","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":"32579d8178f261541e000114","content":"Objections\n\n25%"},{"_id":"326642e5821b067a3500006f","treeId":"31eeab79a37bf4e41f0000e1","seq":1,"position":2,"parentId":"32579d8178f261541e000114","content":"Benefits\n\n25%"},{"_id":"32579dc178f261541e000115","treeId":"31eeab79a37bf4e41f0000e1","seq":2873503,"position":0.9375,"parentId":"3257700178f261541e00010f","content":"## The theory\nThis is nothing new. Painters sketch before painting, sculptors start rough, then refine. If it's possible, it's done this way.\n\nThis principle is deep, and has ties to Fourier transforms.\n\n---\n###### 10% - 30/??"},{"_id":"32583c4678f261541e00012e","treeId":"31eeab79a37bf4e41f0000e1","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":"32579dc178f261541e000115","content":"\n\n10%"},{"_id":"32579a0f78f261541e000111","treeId":"31eeab79a37bf4e41f0000e1","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":"3257700178f261541e00010f","content":"----\n###### Total: 208.33"}],"tree":{"_id":"31eeab79a37bf4e41f0000e1","name":"Snowflake Method","publicUrl":"snowflake-method-old"}}