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Student Engagement
Working Title: : “Will this be on the test?” replaced by “Can I earn money from this?” according to recent study.

A recent study from Maine’s Quaglia Institute for Student Aspirations emphasizes the link between student engagement and their perception of future vocational success. Researchers Michael Corso, Matthew Bundick, Russell Quaglia, and Dawn Haywood acknowledged Fredricks, Blumenfeld, & Paris research specifying student engagement in class based on connections between thought, feeling, and action.

The research team also described the importance of student engagement with content and students’ perception of the relevance to present and future career goals. “Factors that influence a student’s sense of the importance of one class relative to another include a student’s sense of competence in a subject area (e.g., “I am a good writer”) and the present or future relevance of the material (e.g., “I write for the school paper and plan on having a career as a journalist”).

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Abstracts.) Author Affiliations: 1Chief Academic Officer, Quaglia Institute for Student Aspirations, Portland, Maine
2Assistant Professor, Department of Counseling, Psychology, and Special Education, Duquesne University, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania 3President and Founder, Quaglia Institute for Student Aspirations, Portland, Maine 4Chief Executive and Founder, Student Engagement Trust, London, England Full Text Word Count: 4694
ISSN: 0003-1003 Accession Number: 89935759

Background: Not Used
Background: “Seeing oneself as competent in a particular subject is likely to lead to greater confidence, interest, and engagement in that subject; this, in turn, is likely to lead to higher levels of achievement in that subject, which further promotes a sense of competence. Thus, a virtuous circle of competence → confidence → interest → engagement → achievement → competence is established. Relevance of class content is of three types: (a) the content as connected to one’s current interests, (b) the content as contributing to one’s future goals, (c) the content as considered central to one’s identity.” ~Corso, et al

Researchers Michael Corso, Matthew Bundick, Russell Quaglia, and Dawn Haywood acknowledged Fredricks, Blumenfeld, & Paris research and specified that student engagement in class based on connections between thought, feeling, and action.