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  • Mnemonic: CLASSr

  • Consistency: Consistency You’ve contributed before, so clearly you value….why not contribute again?

  • Liking: you’ll contribute because you like me

  • Authority: andrea bocelli says,

  • Scarcity: only x amount of time to go!

  • Social Proof: mention how many people have contributed, hear the phones ringing in the background

  • Reciprocity: Wikipedia, Robin Good, street fair: do a show (reciprocity), make it easy to contribute via credit card (impulsivity). “Let Frank sing for your supper”. “okay, he sang I guess I better contribute”

  • Set high but achievable goals

    Set specific goals

    Get feedback on how you’re doing toward your goal

  • Subgoals: we’ve almost reached the $3,000 mark of our $10,000 goal! Send us $10!

  • Foot in the Door: Thanks so much for contributing $5! Clearly you share our values about…we're almost closing in on X$, since you’ve contributed 5 would you consider contributing $10? (connections to Cialdini’s idea of consistency as well)

  • Door in the Face: will you contribute $100? No? Okay, how about $20?

  • Ask Yourself:

    • What’s your intent?
    • Will what you’re doing make that person feel good about their interaction with you? Or will they feel bad about it?
  • Bystander Problem http://www.stayclassy.org/blog/the-art-of-social-fundraising/ “The problem is that the people passing by tend to think, “It’s not a big deal if I don’t help, there are so many other people here that someone inevitably will.” With everyone thinking this way, no one winds up helping. That’s the bystander effect. If you put an appeal for donations out to your 500 friends on Facebook, it’s easy for each individual friend to ignore the request because they assume that one of the other 499 people will help you out.”

  • “prime” the tip jar (social proof - $20 bill - anchoring) norms? Lots of people are doing it so I guess I better contribute as well. Put a twenty dollar bill in the jar. http://www.thepsychfiles.com/2008/11/episode-78-the-psychology-of-tipping/

  • Wikimedia email response after you contribute: “It’s easy to ignore our fundraising banners, and I’m really glad you didn’t. This is how Wikipedia pays its bills —- people like you giving us money, so we can keep the site freely available for everyone around the world….Please consider sharing this e-mail with a few of your friends to encourage them to donate too.

  • Wikimedia email response after you contribute: “It’s easy to ignore our fundraising banners, and I’m really glad you didn’t. This is how Wikipedia pays its bills —- people like you giving us money, so we can keep the site freely available for everyone around the world….Please consider sharing this e-mail with a few of your friends to encourage them to donate too.

  • Indiegogo takes 4% of the amount you raised. If you fail to reach your goal, then they take 9% of whatever you raised.

    Why? To get you to set a realistic goal. If you say you’re going to raise $10,000 even though you know you won't get that much, Indiegogo will take more of your money than if you set a more realistic goal like, say $10,000.

    Example: goal is too high: $10,000. You raise $5,000. Indiegogo takes 9% = $450

    Goal is realistic: $5,000. You raise $5,000. Indiegogo takes 4% = $250

    “If I put in a lot of effort to raise money I’ll be rewarded (by the money of course), but I’ll also avoid a punishment (the 9% I’ll have to pay Indiegogo)”

{"cards":[{"_id":"36de9487ab6dd08d9e000023","treeId":"369c7e4a83074c691a000026","seq":1,"position":0.5,"parentId":null,"content":"The notes shown here were gathered and used during the recording of episode 104 of The Psych Files podcast, \"The Psychology of Fundraising: http://www.thepsychfiles.com/2013/09/ep-204-the-psychology-of-fundraising/"},{"_id":"369c7f3a83074c691a000029","treeId":"369c7e4a83074c691a000026","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":null,"content":"Research on Happiness"},{"_id":"369c808e83074c691a00002b","treeId":"369c7e4a83074c691a000026","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":"369c7f3a83074c691a000029","content":"Summarized here on The Psych Files podcast:\n\nhttp://www.thepsychfiles.com/2008/04/episode-55-is-it-really-better-to-give-than-to-receive/\n\n\n\nhttp://www.thepsychfiles.com/2013/02/ep-189-the-psych-files-brief-6-facebook-untagging-money-and-happiness-and-memory-and-aging/\n\n\nhttp://www.thepsychfiles.com/2011/09/ep-160-how-to-spend-your-money-and-truly-make-yourself-happy/"},{"_id":"369c7fa683074c691a00002a","treeId":"369c7e4a83074c691a000026","seq":1,"position":2,"parentId":null,"content":"Cialdini's Work on Persuasion"},{"_id":"369c871783074c691a00002c","treeId":"369c7e4a83074c691a000026","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":"369c7fa683074c691a00002a","content":"Mnemonic: CLASSr\n"},{"_id":"369c87af83074c691a00002d","treeId":"369c7e4a83074c691a000026","seq":1,"position":2,"parentId":"369c7fa683074c691a00002a","content":"**Consistency**: Consistency You've contributed before, so clearly you value….why not contribute again? "},{"_id":"369c88d183074c691a00002e","treeId":"369c7e4a83074c691a000026","seq":1,"position":3,"parentId":"369c7fa683074c691a00002a","content":"**Liking**: you'll contribute because you like me"},{"_id":"369c8aa783074c691a000030","treeId":"369c7e4a83074c691a000026","seq":1,"position":3.5,"parentId":"369c7fa683074c691a00002a","content":"**Authority**: andrea bocelli says, "},{"_id":"369c89d383074c691a00002f","treeId":"369c7e4a83074c691a000026","seq":1,"position":4,"parentId":"369c7fa683074c691a00002a","content":"**Scarcity**: only x amount of time to go! "},{"_id":"369c8b7883074c691a000031","treeId":"369c7e4a83074c691a000026","seq":1,"position":6,"parentId":"369c7fa683074c691a00002a","content":"**Social Proof**: mention how many people have contributed, hear the phones ringing in the background"},{"_id":"369c8d0583074c691a000032","treeId":"369c7e4a83074c691a000026","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":"369c8b7883074c691a000031","content":"Bystander Problem http://www.stayclassy.org/blog/the-art-of-social-fundraising/ \"The problem is that the people passing by tend to think, “It’s not a big deal if I don’t help, there are so many other people here that someone inevitably will.” With everyone thinking this way, no one winds up helping. That’s the bystander effect. If you put an appeal for donations out to your 500 friends on Facebook, it’s easy for each individual friend to ignore the request because they assume that one of the other 499 people will help you out.\""},{"_id":"369c914e83074c691a000036","treeId":"369c7e4a83074c691a000026","seq":1,"position":1.75,"parentId":"369c8b7883074c691a000031","content":"\"prime\" the tip jar (social proof - $20 bill - anchoring) norms? Lots of people are doing it so I guess I better contribute as well. Put a twenty dollar bill in the jar. http://www.thepsychfiles.com/2008/11/episode-78-the-psychology-of-tipping/"},{"_id":"369c8d5b83074c691a000033","treeId":"369c7e4a83074c691a000026","seq":1,"position":2,"parentId":"369c8b7883074c691a000031","content":"http://crowdsondemand.com"},{"_id":"369cbae883074c691a000044","treeId":"369c7e4a83074c691a000026","seq":1,"position":4,"parentId":"369c8b7883074c691a000031","content":"Wikimedia email response after you contribute: \"It's easy to ignore our fundraising banners, and I'm really glad you didn't. This is how Wikipedia pays its bills --- people like you giving us money, so we can keep the site freely available for everyone around the world....**Please consider sharing this e-mail with a few of your friends to encourage them to donate too. **"},{"_id":"369c92f583074c691a000038","treeId":"369c7e4a83074c691a000026","seq":1,"position":7,"parentId":"369c7fa683074c691a00002a","content":"**Reciprocity**: Wikipedia, Robin Good, street fair: do a show (reciprocity), make it easy to contribute via credit card (impulsivity). \"Let Frank sing for your supper\". \"okay, he sang I guess I better contribute\""},{"_id":"369cb9cd83074c691a000043","treeId":"369c7e4a83074c691a000026","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":"369c92f583074c691a000038","content":"Wikimedia email response after you contribute: \"It's easy to ignore our fundraising banners, and I'm really glad you didn't. **This is how Wikipedia pays its bills --- people like you giving us money, so we can keep the site freely available for everyone around the world**....Please consider sharing this e-mail with a few of your friends to encourage them to donate too. "},{"_id":"369c947b83074c691a000039","treeId":"369c7e4a83074c691a000026","seq":1,"position":3,"parentId":null,"content":"Goal Setting Theory"},{"_id":"369c95ce83074c691a00003a","treeId":"369c7e4a83074c691a000026","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":"369c947b83074c691a000039","content":"Set **high but achievable** goals\n\nSet **specific** goals\n\nGet **feedback** on how you're doing toward your goal"},{"_id":"369c987283074c691a00003b","treeId":"369c7e4a83074c691a000026","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":"369c95ce83074c691a00003a","content":"Indiegogo takes 4% of the amount you raised.  If you fail to reach your goal, then they take 9% of whatever you raised.\n\nWhy? To get you to set a realistic goal.  If you say you're going to raise $10,000 even though you know you won't get that much, Indiegogo will take more of your money than if you set a more realistic goal like, say $10,000. \n\nExample: goal is too high: $10,000. You raise $5,000. Indiegogo takes 9% = $450\n\nGoal is realistic: $5,000. You raise $5,000. Indiegogo takes 4% = $250\n\n\"If I put in a lot of effort to raise money I'll be rewarded (by the money of course), but I'll also avoid a punishment (the 9% I'll have to pay Indiegogo)\""},{"_id":"369ca5c683074c691a000041","treeId":"369c7e4a83074c691a000026","seq":1,"position":2,"parentId":"369c947b83074c691a000039","content":"Subgoals: we've almost reached the $3,000 mark of our $10,000 goal! Send us $10!"},{"_id":"369c9f3083074c691a00003c","treeId":"369c7e4a83074c691a000026","seq":1,"position":4,"parentId":null,"content":"Social Psychology"},{"_id":"369c9f6983074c691a00003d","treeId":"369c7e4a83074c691a000026","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":"369c9f3083074c691a00003c","content":"**Foot in the Door**: Thanks so much for contributing $5! Clearly you share our values about…we're almost closing in on X$, since you've contributed 5 would you consider contributing $10? (connections to Cialdini's idea of consistency as well) "},{"_id":"369ca17c83074c691a00003e","treeId":"369c7e4a83074c691a000026","seq":1,"position":2,"parentId":"369c9f3083074c691a00003c","content":"**Door in the Face**: will you contribute $100? No? Okay, how about $20?"},{"_id":"369ca28483074c691a00003f","treeId":"369c7e4a83074c691a000026","seq":1,"position":5,"parentId":null,"content":"Emotions"},{"_id":"369ca2d583074c691a000040","treeId":"369c7e4a83074c691a000026","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":"369ca28483074c691a00003f","content":"Emotional Contagion (Hatfield, Cacioppo, and Rapson): plan a big event with lots of people and get them excited.\n\nhttp://www.amazon.com/Emotional-Contagion-Studies-Emotion-Interaction/dp/0521449480/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1380114023&sr=8-1&keywords=emotional+contagion\n\nWhen they get caught up in the frenzy, see if you can get them to contribute (preferably by credit card or check). \n\nhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emotional_contagion"},{"_id":"369cc0fc83074c691a000045","treeId":"369c7e4a83074c691a000026","seq":1,"position":6,"parentId":null,"content":"Ethical Concerns: when have you crossed the line?"},{"_id":"369cc1f883074c691a000047","treeId":"369c7e4a83074c691a000026","seq":1,"position":1,"parentId":"369cc0fc83074c691a000045","content":"Ask Yourself:\n\n* What's your intent?\n* Will what you're doing make that person feel good about their interaction with you? Or will they feel bad about it?"}],"tree":{"_id":"369c7e4a83074c691a000026","name":"The Psychology of Fundraising","publicUrl":"the-psychology-of-fundraising"}}