• Benchmark - Trinitarian Theology

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    Pages: 4

  • Introduction

    • Why the doctrine of Trinity so important?
    • Where in the Bible does it speak about Trinity?
  • Body

    • What are the two major arguments of the existence of God?
    • Where in the Old Testament theology are creation and forgiveness of sin activities exclusively reserved for God?
    • Explain key New Testament texts that associate Jesus with creation and forgiveness, thereby identifying him with the Father.
    • Using a proper theological methodology, explain the Nicene Creed’s identification of the Son with the Father as “homoousios,” of the same being, also, showing that the Spirit is “homoousios” with the Father as well.
  • Conclusion

  • the doctrine of the Trinity is important because it helps describe the nature of God.
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    First, what does the doctrine mean? The doctrine of the Trinity can be summarized in seven statements. (1) There is only one God. (2) The Father is God. (3) The Son is God. (4) The Holy Spirit is God. (5) The Father is not the Son. (6) The Son is the not the Holy Spirit. (7) The Holy Spirit is not the Father. All of the creedal formulations and theological jargon and philosophical apologetics have to do with safeguarding each one of these statements and doing so without denying any of the other six. When the ancient creeds employ extra-biblical terminology and demand careful theological nuance they do so not to clear up what the Bible leaves cloudy, but to defend, define, and delimit essential biblical propositions. The Athanasian Creed puts it this way: “Now this is the catholic faith: That we worship one God in trinity and the trinity in unity, neither blending their persons, nor dividing their essence. For the person of the Father is a distinct person, the person of the Son is another, and that of the Holy Spirit, still another. But the divinity of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit is one, their glory equal, their majesty coeternal.”

    The two key words here are essence and persons. When you read “essence”, think “Godness.” All three Persons of the Trinity share the same “Godness.” One is not more God than another. None is more essentially divine than the rest. When you read “persons”, think “a particular individual distinct from the others.” Theologians use these terms because they are trying to find a way to express the relationship of three beings that are equally and uniquely God, but not three Gods. That’s why we get the tricky (but learnable) language of essence and persons. We want to be true to the biblical witness that there is an indivisibility and unity of God, even though Father, Son, and Holy Spirit can all be rightly called God. The Persons are not three gods; rather, they dwell in communion with each other as they subsist in the divine nature without being compounded or confused.

    Trinity is not an esoteric doctrine forged in an unholy marriage of Greek metaphysical speculation and dodgy biblical interpretation. Rather, to experience the salvific blessings of the gospel is to be immersed in a Trinitarian reality. The gospel invites us to faith, a faith where we call God our Father, Christ our brother, and the Spirit our comforter.

    The Trinity is a corollary of our gospel experience

    If the gospel is the anchor point for our study of God, we must start with the Trinity.

    Bird, M. F. (2013). Evangelical Theology: A biblical and systematic introduction. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan. ISBN-13: 9780310494416

  • The most difficult thing about the Christian concept of the Trinity is that there is no way to perfectly and completely understand it. The Trinity is a concept that is impossible for any human being to fully understand, let alone explain. God is infinitely greater than we are; therefore, we should not expect to be able to fully understand Him. The Bible teaches that the Father is God, that Jesus is God, and that the Holy Spirit is God. The Bible also teaches that there is only one God. Though we can understand some facts about the relationship of the different Persons of the Trinity to one another, ultimately, it is incomprehensible to the human mind. However, this does not mean the Trinity is not true or that it is not based on the teachings of the Bible.

    Trinity Bible Question: “What does the Bible teach about the Trinity?”

    Answer: The most difficult thing about the Christian concept of the Trinity is that there is no way to perfectly and completely understand it. The Trinity is a concept that is impossible for any human being to fully understand, let alone explain. God is infinitely greater than we are; therefore, we should not expect to be able to fully understand Him. The Bible teaches that the Father is God, that Jesus is God, and that the Holy Spirit is God. The Bible also teaches that there is only one God. Though we can understand some facts about the relationship of the different Persons of the Trinity to one another, ultimately, it is incomprehensible to the human mind. However, this does not mean the Trinity is not true or that it is not based on the teachings of the Bible.

    The Trinity is one God existing in three Persons. Understand that this is not in any way suggesting three Gods. Keep in mind when studying this subject that the word “Trinity” is not found in Scripture. This is a term that is used to attempt to describe the triune God—three coexistent, co-eternal Persons who are God. Of real importance is that the concept represented by the word “Trinity” does exist in Scripture. The following is what God’s Word says about the Trinity:

    1) There is one God (Deuteronomy 6:4; 1 Corinthians 8:4; Galatians 3:20; 1 Timothy 2:5).

    2) The Trinity consists of three Persons (Genesis 1:1, 26; 3:22; 11:7; Isaiah 6:8, 48:16, 61:1; Matthew 3:16-17, 28:19; 2 Corinthians 13:14). In Genesis 1:1, the Hebrew plural noun “Elohim” is used. In Genesis 1:26, 3:22, 11:7 and Isaiah 6:8, the plural pronoun for “us” is used. The word “Elohim” and the pronoun “us” are plural forms, definitely referring in the Hebrew language to more than two. While this is not an explicit argument for the Trinity, it does denote the aspect of plurality in God. The Hebrew word for “God,” “Elohim,” definitely allows for the Trinity.

    In Isaiah 48:16 and 61:1, the Son is speaking while making reference to the Father and the Holy Spirit. Compare Isaiah 61:1 to Luke 4:14-19 to see that it is the Son speaking. Matthew 3:16-17 describes the event of Jesus’ baptism. Seen in this passage is God the Holy Spirit descending on God the Son while God the Father proclaims His pleasure in the Son. Matthew 28:19 and 2 Corinthians 13:14 are examples of three distinct Persons in the Trinity.

    3) The members of the Trinity are distinguished one from another in various passages. In the Old Testament, “LORD” is distinguished from “Lord” (Genesis 19:24; Hosea 1:4). The LORD has a Son (Psalm 2:7, 12; Proverbs 30:2-4). The Spirit is distinguished from the “LORD” (Numbers 27:18) and from “God” (Psalm 51:10-12). God the Son is distinguished from God the Father (Psalm 45:6-7; Hebrews 1:8-9). In the New Testament, Jesus speaks to the Father about sending a Helper, the Holy Spirit (John 14:16-17). This shows that Jesus did not consider Himself to be the Father or the Holy Spirit. Consider also all the other times in the Gospels where Jesus speaks to the Father. Was He speaking to Himself? No. He spoke to another Person in the Trinity—the Father.

    4) Each member of the Trinity is God. The Father is God (John 6:27; Romans 1:7; 1 Peter 1:2). The Son is God (John 1:1, 14; Romans 9:5; Colossians 2:9; Hebrews 1:8; 1 John 5:20). The Holy Spirit is God (Acts 5:3-4; 1 Corinthians 3:16).

    5) There is subordination within the Trinity. Scripture shows that the Holy Spirit is subordinate to the Father and the Son, and the Son is subordinate to the Father. This is an internal relationship and does not deny the deity of any Person of the Trinity. This is simply an area which our finite minds cannot understand concerning the infinite God. Concerning the Son see Luke 22:42, John 5:36, John 20:21, and 1 John 4:14. Concerning the Holy Spirit see John 14:16, 14:26, 15:26, 16:7, and especially John 16:13-14.

    6) The individual members of the Trinity have different tasks. The Father is the ultimate source or cause of the universe (1 Corinthians 8:6; Revelation 4:11); divine revelation (Revelation 1:1); salvation (John 3:16-17); and Jesus’ human works (John 5:17; 14:10). The Father initiates all of these things.

    The Son is the agent through whom the Father does the following works: the creation and maintenance of the universe (1 Corinthians 8:6; John 1:3; Colossians 1:16-17); divine revelation (John 1:1, 16:12-15; Matthew 11:27; Revelation 1:1); and salvation (2 Corinthians 5:19; Matthew 1:21; John 4:42). The Father does all these things through the Son, who functions as His agent.

    The Holy Spirit is the means by whom the Father does the following works: creation and maintenance of the universe (Genesis 1:2; Job 26:13; Psalm 104:30); divine revelation (John 16:12-15; Ephesians 3:5; 2 Peter 1:21); salvation (John 3:6; Titus 3:5; 1 Peter 1:2); and Jesus’ works (Isaiah 61:1; Acts 10:38). Thus, the Father does all these things by the power of the Holy Spirit.

    There have been many attempts to develop illustrations of the Trinity. However, none of the popular illustrations are completely accurate. The egg (or apple) fails in that the shell, white, and yolk are parts of the egg, not the egg in themselves, just as the skin, flesh, and seeds of the apple are parts of it, not the apple itself. The Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are not parts of God; each of them is God. The water illustration is somewhat better, but it still fails to adequately describe the Trinity. Liquid, vapor, and ice are forms of water. The Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are not forms of God, each of them is God. So, while these illustrations may give us a picture of the Trinity, the picture is not entirely accurate. An infinite God cannot be fully described by a finite illustration.

    The doctrine of the Trinity has been a divisive issue throughout the entire history of the Christian church. While the core aspects of the Trinity are clearly presented in God’s Word, some of the side issues are not as explicitly clear. The Father is God, the Son is God, and the Holy Spirit is God—but there is only one God. That is the biblical doctrine of the Trinity. Beyond that, the issues are, to a certain extent, debatable and non-essential. Rather than attempting to fully define the Trinity with our finite human minds, we would be better served by focusing on the fact of God’s greatness and His infinitely higher nature. “Oh, the depth of the riches of the wisdom and knowledge of God! How unsearchable his judgments, and his paths beyond tracing out! Who has known the mind of the Lord? Or who has been his counselor?” (Romans 11:33-34).

  • The doctrine of the Trinity is important because it describes the total nature of God. The doctrine of the Trinity itself consists of four statements. First, it must be understood that there is only one God. The Scripture evidently declares that God is one, In Genesis 1:1 states that, In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth (KJV, emphasis added). The word God is this cause means in Hebrew “Elohim, The Almighty”. Elohim is a plural form of “Eloah, The Mighty One”. Elohim is a general term for the deity of God. Moreover, In Genesis 1:26, When God said, “Let Us make man in his own image” (KJV, emphasis added) He was referring to the Trinity and their involvement with the creation. The second statement is that the Father is God. In 1 Corinthians 8:6 Apostle Paul says the there is one God, the Father, of whom are all things, and we for Him; (NKJV). God the Father is the ultimate source of all creation. In Isaiah 43:12-13 God declares that,”I am God. Indeed before the day was I am He. That statement refer to God existed before the creation. Moreover, the speaks of God being the overseer. The third statement is that the Son is God. Throughout the Bible, God the son spoken of. Beginning with the First Gospel or Protoevangelium in Genesis 3:15 when God the Father firmly states to the serpent that,”And I will put enmity between you and the woman, and between your seed and her Seed he shall bruise your head and you shall bruise his heel”.(NKJV). In Isaiah 53, Isaiah refered to him as the suffering servant. Also in Jeremiah 31:31-34, Gospel of the New Covenant which refers to Jesus Christ, the son of God. In Matthew 11:27, Jesus says that” All things have been handed over to me by my Father, and no one knows the Son except the Father, and no one knows the Father except the Son and anyone to whom the Son chooses to reveal him”. Which in turn reveals what it says in John 1:1, that in the beginning he was with God and that he was God. Also and John 10:30, when Jesus said that, I and the Father are one. Jesus is the glue that holds everything together as for the Trinity. Jesus was the word that became flesh how to connect mankind back to God the Father. The fourth statement is that the Holy Spirit is God. The holy spirit is the third person of the Trinity. The word spirit from the Latin word “spiritus” meaning breath. The Holy Spirit was the divine power working in, upon, and around men, and understood by them as the power of God. The Holy Spirit played a critical role in the creation in Genesis 1:2, the spirit of God move on upon the face of the waters (KJV). Acting as a parent watching over their young. The Holy Spirit reveals revelations to those who believe. In Matthew 1:20, is the speaks of how Mary conceive Jesus Through the Holy Spirit. In John 14:26, Jesus told the disciples dad when he ascends to the heavens that God the Father will send in his name. The Holy Spirit is how we connect with Jesus and in turn, Jesus is how we connect with God the Father. It is imperative that the Trinity must stay intact because if the Trinity was not true there will be no creation and there will be no Redemption for salvation.

  • The Ontological Argument
    The first purported proof of the existence of God is the ontological argument. The ontological argument seeks to prove the existence of God from the laws of logic alone. It dates back to St Anselm, an eleventh century philosopher-theologian and archbishop of Canterbury, but was also used by the French philosopher René Descartes. It argues that once we mentally grasp the concept of God we can see that God’s non-existence is impossible. This argument, if it is successful, demonstrates the existence of a perfect being that could not possibly fail to exist.

    The First Cause Argument
    The second purported proof of the existence of God is the first cause argument, also called “the cosmological argument”. The first cause argument seeks to prove the existence of God from the fact that the universe exists. The universe came into existence at a point in the distant past. Nothing can come into existence, though, unless there is something to bring it into existence; nothing comes from nothing. There must therefore be some being outside of the universe that caused the universe to exist. This argument, if it is successful, demonstrates the existence of a Creator that transcends time, that has neither beginning nor end.

    The question of whether there is a conclusive argument for the existence of God has been debated throughout history, with exceedingly intelligent people taking both sides of the dispute. In recent times, arguments against the possibility of God’s existence have taken on a militant spirit that accuses anyone daring to believe in God as being delusional and irrational. Karl Marx asserted that anyone believing in God must have a mental disorder that caused invalid thinking. The psychiatrist Sigmund Freud wrote that a person who believed in a Creator God was delusional and only held those beliefs due to a “wish-fulfillment” factor that produced what Freud considered to be an unjustifiable position. The philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche bluntly said that faith equates to not wanting to know what is true. The voices of these three figures from history (along with others) are simply now parroted by a new generation of atheists who claim that a belief in God is intellectually unwarranted.

    Is this truly the case? Is belief in God a rationally unacceptable position to hold? Is there a logical and reasonable argument for the existence of God? Outside of referencing the Bible, can a case for the existence of God be made that refutes the positions of both the old and new atheists and gives sufficient warrant for believing in a Creator? The answer is, yes, it can. Moreover, in demonstrating the validity of an argument for the existence of God, the case for atheism is shown to be intellectually weak.

    To make an argument for the existence of God, we must start by asking the right questions. We begin with the most basic metaphysical question: “Why do we have something rather than nothing at all?” This is the basic question of existence—why are we here; why is the earth here; why is the universe here rather than nothing? Commenting on this point, one theologian has said, “In one sense man does not ask the question about God, his very existence raises the question about God.”

    In considering this question, there are four possible answers to why we have something rather than nothing at all:

    1. Reality is an illusion.
    2. Reality is/was self-created.

    So, which is the most plausible solution? Let’s begin with reality being simply an illusion, which is what a number of Eastern religions believe. This option was ruled out centuries ago by the philosopher Rene Descartes who is famous for the statement, “I think, therefore I am.” Descartes, a mathematician, argued that if he is thinking, then he must “be.” In other words, “I think, therefore I am not an illusion.” Illusions require something experiencing the illusion, and moreover, you cannot doubt the existence of yourself without proving your existence; it is a self-defeating argument. So the possibility of reality being an illusion is eliminated.

    Next is the option of reality being self-created. When we study philosophy, we learn of “analytically false” statements, which means they are false by definition. The possibility of reality being self-created is one of those types of statements for the simple reason that something cannot be prior to itself. If you created yourself, then you must have existed prior to you creating yourself, but that simply cannot be. In evolution this is sometimes referred to as “spontaneous generation” —something coming from nothing—a position that few, if any, reasonable people hold to anymore simply because you cannot get something from nothing. Even the atheist David Hume said, “I never asserted so absurd a proposition as that anything might arise without a cause.” Since something cannot come from nothing, the alternative of reality being self-created is ruled out.

    G. (2017, February 15). Is there an argument for the existence of God? Retrieved December 10, 2017, from https://www.gotquestions.org/argument-existence-God.html

  • https://www.biblestudytools.com/dictionaries/bakers-evangelical-dictionary/christ-christology.html
    , The God of Jesus Christ (trans. J. J. O’Connell; New York: Crossroads, 1986), 311.what actually happens in the events narrated in the gospel. The different persons of the Godhead each perform significant roles in executing the divine plan to bring salvation to the world. God the Father sends the Son, the Son ministers in the power of the Spirit, the Father hands him over to the cross, the Father by the Spirit raises the Son up, after his ascension the Father and the Son dispense the Spirit to the church, and the Spirit gives glory to the Father and the Son.The sequence of events described in the gospel is the work of Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. This is hardly my own discovery. Consider this statement from the Martyrdom of Polycarp 22.1: “We wish you well, brothers and sisters, while you walk according to the doctrine of the gospel of Jesus Christ; with whom be glory to God the Father and the Holy Spirit, for the salvation of His holy elect.” The early church rec-ognized that the saving event announced in the gospel was the combined and unified effort of all three members of the Godhead. The Father chooses, the Son redeems, and the Spirit sanctifies. Indeed, apart from a triune God, the gospel does not make a lot of sense. Walter Kasper was right to say that the Trinity is “the summation of the entire Chris tian mystery of salvation and, at the same time, its grammar.”5Second, the gospel provides the best means to answer the question: What is God like? For in the gospel, God’s character and qualities are on display. We learn about the severity of God’s judgment and the depth of divine grace and even more. Conse-quently the gospel is the surest place to sample the many attributes of God. From God’s glory to his grace, from his benevolence to his beauty, the gospel enables us to describe God as much as it leads us to ascribe praise to God.Third, the gospel is a story about Jesus set within a larger story of creation, redemption, and new creation. The gospel is like an act within a play, a sequential and logical ele-ment of a continuous narrative. The gospel presupposes previous divine acts such as God’s actions in the creation of the world and God’s revelation of himself to Israel. The gospel is not an abrupt breakaway from those prior scenes, like some kind of theatre of the absurd, where plots and characters are deliberately disjointed. God’s prior work of creation establishes a worldview in which the gospel makes sense and God’s prior revelation of himself provides the narrative in which the gospel, with its central actor Jesus, enters onto the stage. Viewed this way, the gospel requires us to investigate God as both creator and revealer since the gospel points to a God who made the world and who has been laying out his plan to put this world to rights.Fourth, like all stories there is an ultimate aim, and like all stories there is an underlying unity. The gospel momentarily gives us insight into what God’s final objective is, what holds his plan together, and what goal the divine mind has in store by sending his Son and by one day raising up the the mystery of the ages is revealed to be how the one true God, in his only Son, has effected his ultimate purpose to bring glory to himself by the effusion of his holy love in uniting the world with the Logos. In such a manner as this, the gospel of God’s glory leads us to contemplate the moment when we, the church, will be to the praise of his glorious grace.In sum, to study the God of the gospel — the God who handed over his Son, who raised him up again, and who sent his Spirit into our hearts — is to be propelled toward the study of God’s triune being, his divine attributes, his actions of creation and revelation, as well the divine purpose and plan for all things.

    The gospel is like an act within a play, a sequential and logical element of a continuous narrative.

    Bird, M. F. (2013). Evangelical Theology: A biblical and systematic introduction. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan. ISBN-13: 9780310494416

  • He is not just one God in three divine Persons. These Persons also exist in relation to one another. In attempting to express this+ relationship of Father to Son within God we say that the Son is “begotten” of the Father. This is the way that Scripture refers to this divine relationship (see Jn 1:14, 18; 3:16, 18 as examples). When did this take place? Before creation, since, as John notes, the world was made through the Word [the Son]. Such an “action” on the part of God takes place outside of his Creation, outside of time itself. It is not an “event” closed by time, but a way of being within God himself. That is why we say that the Son is “eternally begotten” of the Father. We have to be careful to understand this term. It is often used as synonymous with “to be born” but it really means “to cause to be.” Even though the Son is eternally existent, the Father “causes him to be.” God is the cause of his own existence. So “begotten” here is not the same as “being born.” That is why the Church, in the Nicene Creed, continues this way: “[The Son is] begotten, not made, one in being with the Father.” According to Bird, M. F. (2013, pg. 119), “Functional subordination. The Father and Son are equal in that they share the same essence (homoousious). However, during the incarnation the Son submitted to the authority of the Father. Now if the economic Trinity (the operation of the God-head in creation and redemption) tells us something about the immanent Trinity (the interpersonal relationships within the Godhead in eternity past).”
    Although the early Christians believed the Son is eternally existent, they also believed that the Father initiated his life and death on earth, as God’s one and only son. He was begotten (caused to be). Bird provides the definition of the Trinity that was given in first article of the thirty-nine articles of the Anglican Church. It states, “And in unity of this Godhead, there be three Persons of one substance, power, and eternity; the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost” (Bird, p.98). This relationship is why the early Christians said Jesus is “eternally begotten”. Bird sums it up with this statement, “Jesus is the exemplary model of divine sonship and rightfully claims the title of “Son of God” and “God” by virtue of his unique relationship to his heavenly Father” (Bird, p.102).

    In contrast, Adoption theology may take verses like Psalm 2:7 and Hebrews 1:5, “You are my Son, Today I have begotten you”, and argue that this proves that Jesus was created to be God’s Son and not eternally existent. It is taught that Jesus was chosen by God at his baptism to be the Son of God. I thought that this was interesting as I was reading through the text book because I had never heard this argument before.

    If we are going to study the God of the gospel, we must study God as he is to us in the gospel: a triune being comprised of Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

    If the Son were not God, he could neither reveal the Father nor atone for our sin. If the Spirit were not God, he could unite us neither to the Father and Son nor one another. The gospel, then, requires a triune God.”

    We believe in one God,
    the Father almighty,
    maker of heaven and earth,
    of all things visible and invisible.
    And in one Lord Jesus Christ,
    the only Son of God,
    begotten from the Father before all ages,
    God from God,
    Light from Light,
    true God from true God,
    begotten, not made;
    of the same essence as the Father.
    Through him all things were made.
    For us and for our salvation
    he came down from heaven;
    he became incarnate by the Holy Spirit and the virgin Mary,
    and was made human.
    He was crucified for us under Pontius Pilate;
    he suffered and was buried.
    The third day he rose again, according to the Scriptures.
    He ascended to heaven
    and is seated at the right hand of the Father.
    He will come again with glory
    to judge the living and the dead.
    His kingdom will never end.
    And we believe in the Holy Spirit,
    the Lord, the giver of life.
    He proceeds from the Father and the Son,
    and with the Father and the Son is worshiped and glorified.
    He spoke through the prophets.
    We believe in one holy catholic and apostolic church.
    We affirm one baptism for the forgiveness of sins.
    We look forward to the resurrection of the dead,
    and to life in the world to come. Amen.

    Professor Wendt and class

    Eternally begotten (caused to be) used by the early Christians as referring to Jesus seems to suggest that he was begotten in eternity, or because of John 3:16 (KJV) which uses the term begotten, and could be seen as, giving off a tone of created. But John 1:1 seems to suggest that Jesus (the word/God) existed eternally as the begotten of God, which is himself. That slight difference is what makes it seem contradictory. God the Father is not created or begotten; Jesus is not created but is eternally begotten of God; the Holy Spirit also is not created or begotten but is of God the Father and Jesus (Bird, 2013). The early Christians were not suggesting that Jesus was created. So, what were they really trying to covey by the words “eternally begotten?”

    The early Christians were ensuring that the phrasing in scripture remained faithful to the truth and true intent of John 3:16. The feedback of the ancient Christians at the Nicaea Council (325 AD) was to implement an identifier of “eternal” ahead of the word “begotten” to illustrate the point that Jesus’s beginning was not an unspiritual appearance, but a boundless relationship between God the Father and Jesus the son (“Lecture 2,” 2016). In other words, the Nicene creed used “eternally begotten” as a path to follow when striving to translate God’s word properly. The theory that Jesus was begotten in eternity, rather than eternally begotten remains a bit confusing to many Christians, but I believe Irenaeus of Lyons debated the issue quite well when he stated this straight to the point conclusion. It is declared that the eternal existence of Jesus by no means began to be; Jesus in fact existed eternally with Yahweh (Bird, 2013). Irenaeus of Lyons (130 AD-202 AD) seems to be of the mind set that John 1:1 (Jesus/word) was always with God (Genesis 1:1) the Father and the Holy Spirit (Genesis 1:2).

    References

    As it was stated in Evangelical Theology, “If the Son were not God, he could neither reveal the Father nor atone for our sin. If the Spirit were not God, he could unite us neither to the Father and Son nor one another” (Bird, 2013).

    Nicene Creed. (2017, November 22). Retrieved December 08, 2017, from https://www.crcna.org/welcome/beliefs/creeds/nicene-creed

  • I’m done

  • The doctrine of the Trinity is important because it describes the total nature of God. The doctrine of the Trinity itself consists of seven statements. First, it must be understood that there is only one God. The Scripture evidently declares that God is one, In Genesis 1:1 states that, In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth (KJV, emphasis added). The word God is this cause means in Hebrew \”Elohim, The Almighty\”. Elohim is a plural form of \”Eloah, The Mighty One\”. Elohim is a general term for the deity of God. Moreover, In Genesis 1:26, When God said, \”Let Us make man in his own image\” (KJV, emphasis added) He was referring to the Trinity and their involvement with the creation. The second statement is that the Father is God. In 1 Corinthians 8:6 Apostle Paul says the there is one God, the Father, of whom are all things, and we for Him; (NKJV). God the Father is the ultimate source of all creation. In Isaiah 43:12-13 God declares that,\”I am God. Indeed before the day was I am He. That statement refers to God existed before the creation. Moreover, the speaks of God being the overseer. The third statement is that the Son is God. Throughout the Bible, God the son spoke of. Beginning with the First Gospel or Protoevangelium in Genesis 3:15 when God the Father firmly states to the serpent that,\” And I will put enmity between you and the woman, and between your seed and her Seed he shall bruise your head and you shall bruise his heel\”.(NKJV). In Isaiah 53, Isaiah refers to him as the suffering servant. Also in Jeremiah 31:31-34, Gospel of the New Covenant which refers to Jesus Christ, the son of God

  • The doctrine of the Trinity is important because it describes the total nature of God. The doctrine of the Trinity itself consists of seven statements. First, it must be understood that there is only one God. The Scripture evidently declares that God is one, In Genesis 1:1 states that, In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth (KJV, emphasis added). The word God is this cause means in Hebrew “Elohim, The Almighty”. Elohim is a plural form of “Eloah, The Mighty One”. Elohim is a general term for the deity of God. Moreover, In Genesis 1:26, When God said, “Let Us make man in his own image “ (KJV, emphasis added) He was refering to the Trinity and their involvement with the creation. The second statement is that the Father is God. In 1 corinthians 8:6 Apostle Paul says the there is one God, the Father, of whom are all things, and we for Him; (NKJV). God the Father is the ultimate source of all creation. In Isaiah 43:12-13 God declares that,”I am God. Indeed before the day was I am He. That statement refer to God existed before the creation. Moreover, the speaks of God being the overseer. The third statement is that the Son is God. Throughout the Bible, God the son spoken of. Beginning with the First Gospel or Protoevangelium in Genesis 3:15 when God the Father firmly states to the serpent that,”And I will put enmity between you and the woman, and between your seed and her Seed he shall bruise your head and you shall bruise his heel”.(NKJV). In Isaiah 53, Isaiah refer to him as the suffering servant. Also in Jeremiah 31:31-34, Gospel of the New Covenant which refers to Jesus Christ, the son of God. The Forth tatement is the Holy Spirit is God. The Holy is the third person of the Trinity. The world Spirit derives for the Hebrew word “ruah” and the Greek world “pneuma”. In the Bible there are many instances when the Holy Spirit were involved throughout the Bible. In Genesis 1:2, “ the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the deep” (KJV). In Genesis 8:1, It blew water so it can cause the water from the flood to subside. In Matthew 1:20 the Holy Spirit helped ushered in the New Covenant by Producing Jesus in the womb of Mary and after Jesus ascended to Heaven the Holy Spirit came down (Acts 1). The Holy Spirit is the life-giving Spirit of life.

      • The question of whether there is a compelling argument for the existence of God has been debated throughout different times in history, with exceptionally intelligent people taking both sides of the dispute. In recent times, arguments against the possibility of God’s existence have taken on a militant spirit that accuses anyone daring to believe in God as being delusional and irrational. Atheists and freethinkers alike believe that God does not exist. They believe that people who believe that God exists are delusional and irrational and irrational. Richard Dawkins once said,” God exists, if only in the form of a meme with high survival rates are in effect of power in the environment provided by human culture”. Even the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche bluntly said that faith equates to not wanting to know what is true. And even up to this day, there are still people that feel the same way. So, what are the two major arguments for the existence of God? Before we answer that question we must ask the question: why are we here? There has to be a beginning and an end. The two major questions are: is it logically possible to prove the existence of God? And was God before creation? In Genesis 1:1, it sums it up perfectly by stating, “in the beginning God created the Heaven and the Earth” (KJV). Meaning two things, that there was a god and before the earth created God was there. For some people, that will not suffice. Someone to see God bring his hand down from heaven and write on the dirt saying,”I AM THE LORD THY GOD, BOW DOWN TO ME”. But that’s not going to happen because God gave us free will to decide for ourselves what do we believe in. The most crucial part of believing that God exists is having faith and God and pursue knowing him by reading his word through the lens of the Holy Spirit. Faith is the key component of the Christian faith. As it states in Hebrews 11:1, “faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen (ESV)”.

      • God from the beginning was in charge of everything. In Genesis 1:3, God said: “Let there be light and there was light”(KJV). That was the first glimpse of His majestic power. Then he continued on creating species and then he created human beings. At the end of each day, he would say “it was good”. Proclaiming his love for his creation. According to the Oxford Bible Commentary, This is the craftsman’s assessment of his own work; and it says something about his intention as well as about his artistry (2007 pg. 42). In that short period between Genesis 1-3, everything went exactly how God plans to go until the serpent came and enticed Eve to eat of the forbidden fruit and then gave it to Adam to do likewise. Which led to the fall of Man. From Genesis 4 to Genesis 6 sin consumed his creation. There was even a moment when he regretted creating human beings. Until Noah came about, he was considered by God blameless and just. And he commanded him to build an ark and get two pairs of each animal and his family to go inside the ark because he was about to destroy the world because of sin. That illustration was God being merciful on his creation. And that will lead to the beginning of the Covenants that will ultimately lead to the birth, life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ.

      • what actually happens in the events narrated in the gospel. The different persons of the Godhead each perform significant roles in executing the divine plan to bring salvation to the world. God the Father sends the Son, the Son ministers in the power of the Spirit, the Father hands him over to the cross, the Father by the Spirit raises the Son up, after his ascension the Father and the Son dispense the Spirit to the church, and the Spirit gives glory to the Father and the Son.

      • According to Baker Evangelical Dictionary,Jesus Christ is the central figure whom the Old Testament foreshadows and the New Testament proclaims as prophecy become fact (biblestudytools, 2017). Jesus was God’s ultimate plan for the Salvation of mankind. In John 1:1-5 is the story beginning of Jesus Christ how Jesus is related to God and how Jesus Christ had a huge impact in the creation. Moreover, all things came to him and nothing on this Earth was made without him. Most importantly, Jesus was God in the beginning which means that he is one with the father. As He said in John 10:30 “I in My father is one’ (KJV).

      • As it was stated in Evangelical Theology, “If the Son were not God, he could neither reveal the Father nor atone for our sin. If the Spirit were not God, he could unite us neither to the Father and Son nor one another” (Bird, 2013). The Nicene Creed proclaims God from God, Light from Light, true God from true God, begotten, not made; of the same essence as the Father. Through him all things were made. It pretty much tells the story of John 1:1-4. It means that the father and the son has same qualities that match each other they are both of the same substance. He is not just one God in three divine Persons. These Persons also exist in relation to one another.

      • In conclusion, it will be impossible to see the correlations with God the Father, God the son, and God the Holy Spirit if the person does not read the scriptures. The scriptures is where God reveals himself to the individual. Believing the Trinity is more of a faith-based decision. The truth is it will be impossible to exclude or downplay Jesus from the trinity. Reason why because Jesus is the reason for everything to be created. Moreover, the Holy Spirit is the life-giving god that gives life. God the father is the overseer and watches over all things. All three together consist in the Holy Trinity.

        {"cards":[{"_id":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a218","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11800236,"position":1,"parentId":null,"content":"Benchmark - Trinitarian Theology\n\nWords: 2,000\nWords per page: 500\nPages: 4"},{"_id":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a219","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11800237,"position":2,"parentId":null,"content":"Introduction"},{"_id":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a21a","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11800238,"position":3,"parentId":null,"content":"\n- Why the doctrine of Trinity so important?\n"},{"_id":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a21b","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11808718,"position":1,"parentId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a21a","content":"the doctrine of the Trinity is important because it helps describe the nature of God.\n0\nFirst, what does the doctrine mean? The doctrine of the Trinity can be summarized in seven statements. (1) There is only one God. (2) The Father is God. (3) The Son is God. (4) The Holy Spirit is God. (5) The Father is not the Son. (6) The Son is the not the Holy Spirit. (7) The Holy Spirit is not the Father. All of the creedal formulations and theological jargon and philosophical apologetics have to do with safeguarding each one of these statements and doing so without denying any of the other six. When the ancient creeds employ extra-biblical terminology and demand careful theological nuance they do so not to clear up what the Bible leaves cloudy, but to defend, define, and delimit essential biblical propositions. The Athanasian Creed puts it this way: “Now this is the catholic faith: That we worship one God in trinity and the trinity in unity, neither blending their persons, nor dividing their essence. For the person of the Father is a distinct person, the person of the Son is another, and that of the Holy Spirit, still another. But the divinity of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit is one, their glory equal, their majesty coeternal.”\n\nThe two key words here are essence and persons. When you read “essence”, think “Godness.” All three Persons of the Trinity share the same “Godness.” One is not more God than another. None is more essentially divine than the rest. When you read “persons”, think “a particular individual distinct from the others.” Theologians use these terms because they are trying to find a way to express the relationship of three beings that are equally and uniquely God, but not three Gods. That’s why we get the tricky (but learnable) language of essence and persons. We want to be true to the biblical witness that there is an indivisibility and unity of God, even though Father, Son, and Holy Spirit can all be rightly called God. The Persons are not three gods; rather, they dwell in communion with each other as they subsist in the divine nature without being compounded or confused.\n\nTrinity is not an esoteric doctrine forged in an unholy marriage of Greek metaphysical speculation and dodgy biblical interpretation. Rather, to experience the salvific blessings of the gospel is to be immersed in a Trinitarian reality. The gospel invites us to faith, a faith where we call God our Father, Christ our brother, and the Spirit our comforter.\n\nThe Trinity is a corollary of our gospel experience\n\nIf the gospel is the anchor point for our study of God, we must start with the Trinity.\n\nBird, M. F. (2013). Evangelical Theology: A biblical and systematic introduction. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan. ISBN-13: 9780310494416\n\n\n\n"},{"_id":"7a335a6c0bcb03efaf000068","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11808694,"position":0.5,"parentId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a21b","content":"The doctrine of the Trinity is important because it describes the total nature of God. The doctrine of the Trinity itself consists of seven statements. First, it must be understood that there is only one God. The Scripture evidently declares that God is one, In Genesis 1:1 states that, In the beginning *God* created the heaven and the earth (KJV, emphasis added). The word God is this cause means in Hebrew \\\"Elohim, The Almighty\\\". Elohim is a plural form of \\\"Eloah, The Mighty One\\\". Elohim is a general term for the deity of God. Moreover, In Genesis 1:26, When God said, \\\"Let *Us* make man in his own image\\\" (KJV, emphasis added) He was referring to the Trinity and their involvement with the creation. The second statement is that the Father is God. In 1 Corinthians 8:6 Apostle Paul says the there is one God, the Father, of whom are all things, and we for Him; (NKJV). God the Father is the ultimate source of all creation. In Isaiah 43:12-13 God declares that,\\\"I am God. Indeed before the day was I am He. That statement refers to God existed before the creation. Moreover, the speaks of God being the overseer. The third statement is that the Son is God. Throughout the Bible, God the son spoke of. Beginning with the First Gospel or Protoevangelium in Genesis 3:15 when God the Father firmly states to the serpent that,\\\" And I will put enmity between you and the woman, and between your seed and her Seed he shall bruise your head and you shall bruise his heel\\\".(NKJV). In Isaiah 53, Isaiah refers to him as the suffering servant. Also in Jeremiah 31:31-34, Gospel of the New Covenant which refers to Jesus Christ, the son of God"},{"_id":"7a335c267fa086f3dd000100","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11808654,"position":1,"parentId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a21b","content":""},{"_id":"7a335b7b7fa086f3dd000101","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11808756,"position":2,"parentId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a21b","content":""},{"_id":"7a33429d0bcb03efaf000069","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11808722,"position":3,"parentId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a21b","content":"The doctrine of the Trinity is important because it describes the total nature of God. The doctrine of the Trinity itself consists of seven statements. First, it must be understood that there is only one God. The Scripture evidently declares that God is one, In Genesis 1:1 states that, In the beginning *God* created the heaven and the earth (KJV, emphasis added). The word God is this cause means in Hebrew \"Elohim, The Almighty\". Elohim is a plural form of \"Eloah, The Mighty One\". Elohim is a general term for the deity of God. Moreover, In Genesis 1:26, When God said, \"Let *Us* make man in his own image \" (KJV, emphasis added) He was refering to the Trinity and their involvement with the creation. The second statement is that the Father is God. In 1 corinthians 8:6 Apostle Paul says the there is one God, the Father, of whom are all things, and we for Him; (NKJV). God the Father is the ultimate source of all creation. In Isaiah 43:12-13 God declares that,\"I am God. Indeed before the day was I am He. That statement refer to God existed before the creation. Moreover, the speaks of God being the overseer. The third statement is that the Son is God. Throughout the Bible, God the son spoken of. Beginning with the First Gospel or Protoevangelium in Genesis 3:15 when God the Father firmly states to the serpent that,\"And I will put enmity between you and the woman, and between your seed and her Seed he shall bruise your head and you shall bruise his heel\".(NKJV). In Isaiah 53, Isaiah refer to him as the suffering servant. Also in Jeremiah 31:31-34, Gospel of the New Covenant which refers to Jesus Christ, the son of God. The Forth tatement is the Holy Spirit is God. The Holy is the third person of the Trinity. The world Spirit derives for the Hebrew word \"ruah\" and the Greek world \"pneuma\". In the Bible there are many instances when the Holy Spirit were involved throughout the Bible. In Genesis 1:2, \" the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the deep\" (KJV). In Genesis 8:1, It blew water so it can cause the water from the flood to subside. In Matthew 1:20 the Holy Spirit helped ushered in the New Covenant by Producing Jesus in the womb of Mary and after Jesus ascended to Heaven the Holy Spirit came down (Acts 1). The Holy Spirit is the life-giving Spirit of life."},{"_id":"7a332b8f0bcb03efaf000071","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11808703,"position":1,"parentId":"7a33429d0bcb03efaf000069","content":""},{"_id":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a21c","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11808667,"position":4,"parentId":null,"content":"- Where in the Bible does it speak about Trinity?","deleted":false},{"_id":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a21d","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11804532,"position":1,"parentId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a21c","content":"The most difficult thing about the Christian concept of the Trinity is that there is no way to perfectly and completely understand it. The Trinity is a concept that is impossible for any human being to fully understand, let alone explain. God is infinitely greater than we are; therefore, we should not expect to be able to fully understand Him. The Bible teaches that the Father is God, that Jesus is God, and that the Holy Spirit is God. The Bible also teaches that there is only one God. Though we can understand some facts about the relationship of the different Persons of the Trinity to one another, ultimately, it is incomprehensible to the human mind. However, this does not mean the Trinity is not true or that it is not based on the teachings of the Bible.\n\n\nTrinity Bible Question: \"What does the Bible teach about the Trinity?\"\n\nAnswer: The most difficult thing about the Christian concept of the Trinity is that there is no way to perfectly and completely understand it. The Trinity is a concept that is impossible for any human being to fully understand, let alone explain. God is infinitely greater than we are; therefore, we should not expect to be able to fully understand Him. The Bible teaches that the Father is God, that Jesus is God, and that the Holy Spirit is God. The Bible also teaches that there is only one God. Though we can understand some facts about the relationship of the different Persons of the Trinity to one another, ultimately, it is incomprehensible to the human mind. However, this does not mean the Trinity is not true or that it is not based on the teachings of the Bible.\n\n\n\nThe Trinity is one God existing in three Persons. Understand that this is not in any way suggesting three Gods. Keep in mind when studying this subject that the word “Trinity” is not found in Scripture. This is a term that is used to attempt to describe the triune God—three coexistent, co-eternal Persons who are God. Of real importance is that the concept represented by the word “Trinity” does exist in Scripture. The following is what God’s Word says about the Trinity:\n\n1) There is one God (Deuteronomy 6:4; 1 Corinthians 8:4; Galatians 3:20; 1 Timothy 2:5).\n\n2) The Trinity consists of three Persons (Genesis 1:1, 26; 3:22; 11:7; Isaiah 6:8, 48:16, 61:1; Matthew 3:16-17, 28:19; 2 Corinthians 13:14). In Genesis 1:1, the Hebrew plural noun \"Elohim\" is used. In Genesis 1:26, 3:22, 11:7 and Isaiah 6:8, the plural pronoun for “us” is used. The word \"Elohim\" and the pronoun “us” are plural forms, definitely referring in the Hebrew language to more than two. While this is not an explicit argument for the Trinity, it does denote the aspect of plurality in God. The Hebrew word for \"God,\" \"Elohim,\" definitely allows for the Trinity.\n\nIn Isaiah 48:16 and 61:1, the Son is speaking while making reference to the Father and the Holy Spirit. Compare Isaiah 61:1 to Luke 4:14-19 to see that it is the Son speaking. Matthew 3:16-17 describes the event of Jesus' baptism. Seen in this passage is God the Holy Spirit descending on God the Son while God the Father proclaims His pleasure in the Son. Matthew 28:19 and 2 Corinthians 13:14 are examples of three distinct Persons in the Trinity.\n\n3) The members of the Trinity are distinguished one from another in various passages. In the Old Testament, “LORD” is distinguished from “Lord” (Genesis 19:24; Hosea 1:4). The LORD has a Son (Psalm 2:7, 12; Proverbs 30:2-4). The Spirit is distinguished from the “LORD” (Numbers 27:18) and from “God” (Psalm 51:10-12). God the Son is distinguished from God the Father (Psalm 45:6-7; Hebrews 1:8-9). In the New Testament, Jesus speaks to the Father about sending a Helper, the Holy Spirit (John 14:16-17). This shows that Jesus did not consider Himself to be the Father or the Holy Spirit. Consider also all the other times in the Gospels where Jesus speaks to the Father. Was He speaking to Himself? No. He spoke to another Person in the Trinity—the Father.\n\n4) Each member of the Trinity is God. The Father is God (John 6:27; Romans 1:7; 1 Peter 1:2). The Son is God (John 1:1, 14; Romans 9:5; Colossians 2:9; Hebrews 1:8; 1 John 5:20). The Holy Spirit is God (Acts 5:3-4; 1 Corinthians 3:16).\n\n5) There is subordination within the Trinity. Scripture shows that the Holy Spirit is subordinate to the Father and the Son, and the Son is subordinate to the Father. This is an internal relationship and does not deny the deity of any Person of the Trinity. This is simply an area which our finite minds cannot understand concerning the infinite God. Concerning the Son see Luke 22:42, John 5:36, John 20:21, and 1 John 4:14. Concerning the Holy Spirit see John 14:16, 14:26, 15:26, 16:7, and especially John 16:13-14.\n\n6) The individual members of the Trinity have different tasks. The Father is the ultimate source or cause of the universe (1 Corinthians 8:6; Revelation 4:11); divine revelation (Revelation 1:1); salvation (John 3:16-17); and Jesus' human works (John 5:17; 14:10). The Father initiates all of these things.\n\nThe Son is the agent through whom the Father does the following works: the creation and maintenance of the universe (1 Corinthians 8:6; John 1:3; Colossians 1:16-17); divine revelation (John 1:1, 16:12-15; Matthew 11:27; Revelation 1:1); and salvation (2 Corinthians 5:19; Matthew 1:21; John 4:42). The Father does all these things through the Son, who functions as His agent.\n\nThe Holy Spirit is the means by whom the Father does the following works: creation and maintenance of the universe (Genesis 1:2; Job 26:13; Psalm 104:30); divine revelation (John 16:12-15; Ephesians 3:5; 2 Peter 1:21); salvation (John 3:6; Titus 3:5; 1 Peter 1:2); and Jesus' works (Isaiah 61:1; Acts 10:38). Thus, the Father does all these things by the power of the Holy Spirit.\n\nThere have been many attempts to develop illustrations of the Trinity. However, none of the popular illustrations are completely accurate. The egg (or apple) fails in that the shell, white, and yolk are parts of the egg, not the egg in themselves, just as the skin, flesh, and seeds of the apple are parts of it, not the apple itself. The Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are not parts of God; each of them is God. The water illustration is somewhat better, but it still fails to adequately describe the Trinity. Liquid, vapor, and ice are forms of water. The Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are not forms of God, each of them is God. So, while these illustrations may give us a picture of the Trinity, the picture is not entirely accurate. An infinite God cannot be fully described by a finite illustration.\n\nThe doctrine of the Trinity has been a divisive issue throughout the entire history of the Christian church. While the core aspects of the Trinity are clearly presented in God’s Word, some of the side issues are not as explicitly clear. The Father is God, the Son is God, and the Holy Spirit is God—but there is only one God. That is the biblical doctrine of the Trinity. Beyond that, the issues are, to a certain extent, debatable and non-essential. Rather than attempting to fully define the Trinity with our finite human minds, we would be better served by focusing on the fact of God's greatness and His infinitely higher nature. “Oh, the depth of the riches of the wisdom and knowledge of God! How unsearchable his judgments, and his paths beyond tracing out! Who has known the mind of the Lord? Or who has been his counselor?” (Romans 11:33-34).\n"},{"_id":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a21f","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11807750,"position":5,"parentId":null,"content":"Body"},{"_id":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a220","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11804167,"position":6,"parentId":null,"content":"\n- What are the two major arguments of the existence of God?\n"},{"_id":"7a3f73dd8a3211f9e1000021","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11808307,"position":0.5,"parentId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a220","content":" The doctrine of the Trinity is important because it describes the total nature of God. The doctrine of the Trinity itself consists of four statements. First, it must be understood that there is only one God. The Scripture evidently declares that God is one, In Genesis 1:1 states that, In the beginning *God* created the heaven and the earth (KJV, emphasis added). The word God is this cause means in Hebrew \"Elohim, The Almighty\". Elohim is a plural form of \"Eloah, The Mighty One\". Elohim is a general term for the deity of God. Moreover, In Genesis 1:26, When God said, \"Let *Us* make man in his own image\" (KJV, emphasis added) He was referring to the Trinity and their involvement with the creation. The second statement is that the Father is God. In 1 Corinthians 8:6 Apostle Paul says the there is one God, the Father, of whom are all things, and we for Him; (NKJV). God the Father is the ultimate source of all creation. In Isaiah 43:12-13 God declares that,\"I am God. Indeed before the day was I am He. That statement refer to God existed before the creation. Moreover, the speaks of God being the overseer. The third statement is that the Son is God. Throughout the Bible, God the son spoken of. Beginning with the First Gospel or Protoevangelium in Genesis 3:15 when God the Father firmly states to the serpent that,\"And I will put enmity between you and the woman, and between your seed and her Seed he shall bruise your head and you shall bruise his heel\".(NKJV). In Isaiah 53, Isaiah refered to him as the suffering servant. Also in Jeremiah 31:31-34, Gospel of the New Covenant which refers to Jesus Christ, the son of God. In Matthew 11:27, Jesus says that\" All things have been handed over to me by my Father, and no one knows the Son except the Father, and no one knows the Father except the Son and anyone to whom the Son chooses to reveal him\". Which in turn reveals what it says in John 1:1, that in the beginning he was with God and that he was God. Also and John 10:30, when Jesus said that, I and the Father are one. Jesus is the glue that holds everything together as for the Trinity. Jesus was the word that became flesh how to connect mankind back to God the Father. The fourth statement is that the Holy Spirit is God. The holy spirit is the third person of the Trinity. The word spirit from the Latin word \"spiritus\" meaning breath. The Holy Spirit was the divine power working in, upon, and around men, and understood by them as the power of God. The Holy Spirit played a critical role in the creation in Genesis 1:2, the *spirit of God* move on upon the face of the waters (KJV). Acting as a parent watching over their young. The Holy Spirit reveals revelations to those who believe. In Matthew 1:20, is the speaks of how Mary conceive Jesus Through the Holy Spirit. In John 14:26, Jesus told the disciples dad when he ascends to the heavens that God the Father will send in his name. The Holy Spirit is how we connect with Jesus and in turn, Jesus is how we connect with God the Father. It is imperative that the Trinity must stay intact because if the Trinity was not true there will be no creation and there will be no Redemption for salvation."},{"_id":"7a4263cfbf908f07b9000027","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11808529,"position":1,"parentId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a220","content":"The Ontological Argument\nThe first purported proof of the existence of God is the ontological argument. The ontological argument seeks to prove the existence of God from the laws of logic alone. It dates back to St Anselm, an eleventh century philosopher-theologian and archbishop of Canterbury, but was also used by the French philosopher René Descartes. It argues that once we mentally grasp the concept of God we can see that God’s non-existence is impossible. This argument, if it is successful, demonstrates the existence of a perfect being that could not possibly fail to exist.\n\nThe First Cause Argument\nThe second purported proof of the existence of God is the first cause argument, also called “the cosmological argument”. The first cause argument seeks to prove the existence of God from the fact that the universe exists. The universe came into existence at a point in the distant past. Nothing can come into existence, though, unless there is something to bring it into existence; nothing comes from nothing. There must therefore be some being outside of the universe that caused the universe to exist. This argument, if it is successful, demonstrates the existence of a Creator that transcends time, that has neither beginning nor end.\n\nThe question of whether there is a conclusive argument for the existence of God has been debated throughout history, with exceedingly intelligent people taking both sides of the dispute. In recent times, arguments against the possibility of God’s existence have taken on a militant spirit that accuses anyone daring to believe in God as being delusional and irrational. Karl Marx asserted that anyone believing in God must have a mental disorder that caused invalid thinking. The psychiatrist Sigmund Freud wrote that a person who believed in a Creator God was delusional and only held those beliefs due to a “wish-fulfillment” factor that produced what Freud considered to be an unjustifiable position. The philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche bluntly said that faith equates to not wanting to know what is true. The voices of these three figures from history (along with others) are simply now parroted by a new generation of atheists who claim that a belief in God is intellectually unwarranted.\n\nIs this truly the case? Is belief in God a rationally unacceptable position to hold? Is there a logical and reasonable argument for the existence of God? Outside of referencing the Bible, can a case for the existence of God be made that refutes the positions of both the old and new atheists and gives sufficient warrant for believing in a Creator? The answer is, yes, it can. Moreover, in demonstrating the validity of an argument for the existence of God, the case for atheism is shown to be intellectually weak. \n\nTo make an argument for the existence of God, we must start by asking the right questions. We begin with the most basic metaphysical question: “Why do we have something rather than nothing at all?” This is the basic question of existence—why are we here; why is the earth here; why is the universe here rather than nothing? Commenting on this point, one theologian has said, “In one sense man does not ask the question about God, his very existence raises the question about God.” \n\nIn considering this question, there are four possible answers to why we have something rather than nothing at all: \n\n1. Reality is an illusion.\n2. Reality is/was self-created.\n\nSo, which is the most plausible solution? Let’s begin with reality being simply an illusion, which is what a number of Eastern religions believe. This option was ruled out centuries ago by the philosopher Rene Descartes who is famous for the statement, “I think, therefore I am.” Descartes, a mathematician, argued that if he is thinking, then he must “be.” In other words, “I think, therefore I am not an illusion.” Illusions require something experiencing the illusion, and moreover, you cannot doubt the existence of yourself without proving your existence; it is a self-defeating argument. So the possibility of reality being an illusion is eliminated.\n\nNext is the option of reality being self-created. When we study philosophy, we learn of “analytically false” statements, which means they are false by definition. The possibility of reality being self-created is one of those types of statements for the simple reason that something cannot be prior to itself. If you created yourself, then you must have existed prior to you creating yourself, but that simply cannot be. In evolution this is sometimes referred to as “spontaneous generation” —something coming from nothing—a position that few, if any, reasonable people hold to anymore simply because you cannot get something from nothing. Even the atheist David Hume said, “I never asserted so absurd a proposition as that anything might arise without a cause.” Since something cannot come from nothing, the alternative of reality being self-created is ruled out. \n\nG. (2017, February 15). Is there an argument for the existence of God? Retrieved December 10, 2017, from https://www.gotquestions.org/argument-existence-God.html"},{"_id":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a221","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11804329,"position":7,"parentId":null,"content":"- Where in the Old Testament theology are creation and forgiveness of sin activities exclusively reserved for God?"},{"_id":"7a413c3bbf908f07b9000045","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11808533,"position":1,"parentId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a221","content":"https://www.biblestudytools.com/dictionaries/bakers-evangelical-dictionary/god.html\n\nBarton, J., & Muddiman, J. (Eds.). (2007). The oxford bible commentary. Retrieved from https://ebookcentral-proquest-com.lopes.idm.oclc.org"},{"_id":"7a37deb5d94459e949000023","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11808646,"position":0.5,"parentId":"7a413c3bbf908f07b9000045","content":"The question of whether there is a compelling argument for the existence of God has been debated throughout different times in history, with exceptionally intelligent people taking both sides of the dispute. In recent times, arguments against the possibility of God’s existence have taken on a militant spirit that accuses anyone daring to believe in God as being delusional and irrational. Atheists and freethinkers alike believe that God does not exist. They believe that people who believe that God exists are delusional and irrational and irrational. Richard Dawkins once said,\" God exists, if only in the form of a meme with high survival rates are in effect of power in the environment provided by human culture\". Even the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche bluntly said that faith equates to not wanting to know what is true. And even up to this day, there are still people that feel the same way. So, what are the two major arguments for the existence of God? Before we answer that question we must ask the question: why are we here? There has to be a beginning and an end. The two major questions are: is it logically possible to prove the existence of God? And was God before creation? In Genesis 1:1, it sums it up perfectly by stating, \"in the beginning God created the Heaven and the Earth\" (KJV). Meaning two things, that there was a god and before the earth created God was there. For some people, that will not suffice. Someone to see God bring his hand down from heaven and write on the dirt saying,\"I AM THE LORD THY GOD, BOW DOWN TO ME\". But that's not going to happen because God gave us free will to decide for ourselves what do we believe in. The most crucial part of believing that God exists is having faith and God and pursue knowing him by reading his word through the lens of the Holy Spirit. Faith is the key component of the Christian faith. As it states in Hebrews 11:1, \"faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen (ESV)\". "},{"_id":"7a358ae8de9745ada2000029","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11808552,"position":1,"parentId":"7a413c3bbf908f07b9000045","content":"God from the beginning was in charge of everything. In Genesis 1:3, God said: \"Let there be light and there was light\"(KJV). That was the first glimpse of His majestic power. Then he continued on creating species and then he created human beings. At the end of each day, he would say \"it was good\". Proclaiming his love for his creation. According to the Oxford Bible Commentary, This is the craftsman's assessment of his own work; and it says something about his intention as well as about his artistry (2007 pg. 42). In that short period between Genesis 1-3, everything went exactly how God plans to go until the serpent came and enticed Eve to eat of the forbidden fruit and then gave it to Adam to do likewise. Which led to the fall of Man. From Genesis 4 to Genesis 6 sin consumed his creation. There was even a moment when he regretted creating human beings. Until Noah came about, he was considered by God blameless and just. And he commanded him to build an ark and get two pairs of each animal and his family to go inside the ark because he was about to destroy the world because of sin. That illustration was God being merciful on his creation. And that will lead to the beginning of the Covenants that will ultimately lead to the birth, life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ.\n"},{"_id":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a222","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11800246,"position":8,"parentId":null,"content":"- Explain key New Testament texts that associate Jesus with creation and forgiveness, thereby identifying him with the Father."},{"_id":"7a413886bf908f07b9000046","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11808725,"position":1,"parentId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a222","content":"https://www.biblestudytools.com/dictionaries/bakers-evangelical-dictionary/christ-christology.html\n, The God of Jesus Christ (trans. J. J. O’Connell; New York: Crossroads, 1986), 311.what actually happens in the events narrated in the gospel. The different persons of the Godhead each perform significant roles in executing the divine plan to bring salvation to the world. God the Father sends the Son, the Son ministers in the power of the Spirit, the Father hands him over to the cross, the Father by the Spirit raises the Son up, after his ascension the Father and the Son dispense the Spirit to the church, and the Spirit gives glory to the Father and the Son.The sequence of events described in the gospel is the work of Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. This is hardly my own discovery. Consider this statement from the Martyrdom of Polycarp 22.1: “We wish you well, brothers and sisters, while you walk according to the doctrine of the gospel of Jesus Christ; with whom be glory to God the Father and the Holy Spirit, for the salvation of His holy elect.” The early church rec-ognized that the saving event announced in the gospel was the combined and unified effort of all three members of the Godhead. The Father chooses, the Son redeems, and the Spirit sanctifies. Indeed, apart from a triune God, the gospel does not make a lot of sense. Walter Kasper was right to say that the Trinity is “the summation of the entire Chris tian mystery of salvation and, at the same time, its grammar.”5Second, the gospel provides the best means to answer the question: What is God like? For in the gospel, God’s character and qualities are on display. We learn about the severity of God’s judgment and the depth of divine grace and even more. Conse-quently the gospel is the surest place to sample the many attributes of God. From God’s glory to his grace, from his benevolence to his beauty, the gospel enables us to describe God as much as it leads us to ascribe praise to God.Third, the gospel is a story about Jesus set within a larger story of creation, redemption, and new creation. The gospel is like an act within a play, a sequential and logical ele-ment of a continuous narrative. The gospel presupposes previous divine acts such as God’s actions in the creation of the world and God’s revelation of himself to Israel. The gospel is not an abrupt breakaway from those prior scenes, like some kind of theatre of the absurd, where plots and characters are deliberately disjointed. God’s prior work of creation establishes a worldview in which the gospel makes sense and God’s prior revelation of himself provides the narrative in which the gospel, with its central actor Jesus, enters onto the stage. Viewed this way, the gospel requires us to investigate God as both creator and revealer since the gospel points to a God who made the world and who has been laying out his plan to put this world to rights.Fourth, like all stories there is an ultimate aim, and like all stories there is an underlying unity. The gospel momentarily gives us insight into what God’s final objective is, what holds his plan together, and what goal the divine mind has in store by sending his Son and by one day raising up the the mystery of the ages is revealed to be how the one true God, in his only Son, has effected his ultimate purpose to bring glory to himself by the effusion of his holy love in uniting the world with the Logos. In such a manner as this, the gospel of God’s glory leads us to contemplate the moment when we, the church, will be to the praise of his glorious grace.In sum, to study the God of the gospel — the God who handed over his Son, who raised him up again, and who sent his Spirit into our hearts — is to be propelled toward the study of God’s triune being, his divine attributes, his actions of creation and revelation, as well the divine purpose and plan for all things.\n\nThe gospel is like an act within a play, a sequential and logical element of a continuous narrative.\n\nBird, M. F. (2013). Evangelical Theology: A biblical and systematic introduction. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan. ISBN-13: 9780310494416"},{"_id":"7a343ccf12f3145a5b000023","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11808641,"position":1,"parentId":"7a413886bf908f07b9000046","content":"what actually happens in the events narrated in the gospel. The different persons of the Godhead each perform significant roles in executing the divine plan to bring salvation to the world. God the Father sends the Son, the Son ministers in the power of the Spirit, the Father hands him over to the cross, the Father by the Spirit raises the Son up, after his ascension the Father and the Son dispense the Spirit to the church, and the Spirit gives glory to the Father and the Son. "},{"_id":"7a3426ba12f3145a5b000024","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11808640,"position":2,"parentId":"7a413886bf908f07b9000046","content":"According to Baker Evangelical Dictionary,Jesus Christ is the central figure whom the Old Testament foreshadows and the New Testament proclaims as prophecy become fact (biblestudytools, 2017). Jesus was God's ultimate plan for the Salvation of mankind. In John 1:1-5 is the story beginning of Jesus Christ how Jesus is related to God and how Jesus Christ had a huge impact in the creation. Moreover, all things came to him and nothing on this Earth was made without him. Most importantly, Jesus was God in the beginning which means that he is one with the father. As He said in John 10:30 \"I in My father is one' (KJV)."},{"_id":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a223","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11800247,"position":9,"parentId":null,"content":"- Using a proper theological methodology, explain the Nicene Creed's identification of the Son with the Father as \"homoousios,\" of the same being, also, showing that the Spirit is \"homoousios\" with the Father as well."},{"_id":"7a33e8687fa086f3dd000073","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11808723,"position":1,"parentId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a223","content":"He is not just one God in three divine Persons. These Persons also exist in relation to one another. In attempting to express this+ relationship of Father to Son within God we say that the Son is \"begotten\" of the Father. This is the way that Scripture refers to this divine relationship (see Jn 1:14, 18; 3:16, 18 as examples). When did this take place? Before creation, since, as John notes, the world was made through the Word [the Son]. Such an \"action\" on the part of God takes place outside of his Creation, outside of time itself. It is not an \"event\" closed by time, but a way of being within God himself. That is why we say that the Son is \"eternally begotten\" of the Father. We have to be careful to understand this term. It is often used as synonymous with \"to be born\" but it really means \"to cause to be.\" Even though the Son is eternally existent, the Father \"causes him to be.\" God is the cause of his own existence. So \"begotten\" here is not the same as \"being born.\" That is why the Church, in the Nicene Creed, continues this way: \"[The Son is] begotten, not made, one in being with the Father.\" According to Bird, M. F. (2013, pg. 119), \"Functional subordination. The Father and Son are equal in that they share the same essence (homoousious). However, during the incarnation the Son submitted to the authority of the Father. Now if the economic Trinity (the operation of the God-head in creation and redemption) tells us something about the immanent Trinity (the interpersonal relationships within the Godhead in eternity past).\"\nAlthough the early Christians believed the Son is eternally existent, they also believed that the Father initiated his life and death on earth, as God’s one and only son. He was begotten (caused to be). Bird provides the definition of the Trinity that was given in first article of the thirty-nine articles of the Anglican Church. It states, “And in unity of this Godhead, there be three Persons of one substance, power, and eternity; the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost” (Bird, p.98). This relationship is why the early Christians said Jesus is “eternally begotten”. Bird sums it up with this statement, “Jesus is the exemplary model of divine sonship and rightfully claims the title of “Son of God” and “God” by virtue of his unique relationship to his heavenly Father” (Bird, p.102).\n\nIn contrast, Adoption theology may take verses like Psalm 2:7 and Hebrews 1:5, “You are my Son, Today I have begotten you”, and argue that this proves that Jesus was created to be God’s Son and not eternally existent. It is taught that Jesus was chosen by God at his baptism to be the Son of God. I thought that this was interesting as I was reading through the text book because I had never heard this argument before.\n\nIf we are going to study the God of the gospel, we must study God as he is to us in the gospel: a triune being comprised of Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.\n\nIf the Son were not God, he could neither reveal the Father nor atone for our sin. If the Spirit were not God, he could unite us neither to the Father and Son nor one another. The gospel, then, requires a triune God.”\n\nWe believe in one God,\n the Father almighty,\n maker of heaven and earth,\n of all things visible and invisible.\nAnd in one Lord Jesus Christ,\n the only Son of God,\n begotten from the Father before all ages,\n God from God,\n Light from Light,\n true God from true God,\n begotten, not made;\n of the same essence as the Father.\n Through him all things were made.\n For us and for our salvation\n he came down from heaven;\n he became incarnate by the Holy Spirit and the virgin Mary,\n and was made human.\n He was crucified for us under Pontius Pilate;\n he suffered and was buried.\n The third day he rose again, according to the Scriptures.\n He ascended to heaven\n and is seated at the right hand of the Father.\n He will come again with glory\n to judge the living and the dead.\n His kingdom will never end.\nAnd we believe in the Holy Spirit,\n the Lord, the giver of life.\n He proceeds from the Father and the Son,\n and with the Father and the Son is worshiped and glorified.\n He spoke through the prophets.\n We believe in one holy catholic and apostolic church.\n We affirm one baptism for the forgiveness of sins.\n We look forward to the resurrection of the dead,\n and to life in the world to come. Amen.\n\nProfessor Wendt and class\n\nEternally begotten (caused to be) used by the early Christians as referring to Jesus seems to suggest that he was begotten in eternity, or because of John 3:16 (KJV) which uses the term begotten, and could be seen as, giving off a tone of created. But John 1:1 seems to suggest that Jesus (the word/God) existed eternally as the begotten of God, which is himself. That slight difference is what makes it seem contradictory. God the Father is not created or begotten; Jesus is not created but is eternally begotten of God; the Holy Spirit also is not created or begotten but is of God the Father and Jesus (Bird, 2013). The early Christians were not suggesting that Jesus was created. So, what were they really trying to covey by the words “eternally begotten?”\n\nThe early Christians were ensuring that the phrasing in scripture remained faithful to the truth and true intent of John 3:16. The feedback of the ancient Christians at the Nicaea Council (325 AD) was to implement an identifier of “eternal” ahead of the word “begotten” to illustrate the point that Jesus’s beginning was not an unspiritual appearance, but a boundless relationship between God the Father and Jesus the son (“Lecture 2,” 2016). In other words, the Nicene creed used “eternally begotten” as a path to follow when striving to translate God’s word properly. The theory that Jesus was begotten in eternity, rather than eternally begotten remains a bit confusing to many Christians, but I believe Irenaeus of Lyons debated the issue quite well when he stated this straight to the point conclusion. It is declared that the eternal existence of Jesus by no means began to be; Jesus in fact existed eternally with Yahweh (Bird, 2013). Irenaeus of Lyons (130 AD-202 AD) seems to be of the mind set that John 1:1 (Jesus/word) was always with God (Genesis 1:1) the Father and the Holy Spirit (Genesis 1:2).\n\nReferences\n\n\n\nAs it was stated in Evangelical Theology, \"If the Son were not God, he could neither reveal the Father nor atone for our sin. If the Spirit were not God, he could unite us neither to the Father and Son nor one another\" (Bird, 2013). \n\nNicene Creed. (2017, November 22). Retrieved December 08, 2017, from https://www.crcna.org/welcome/beliefs/creeds/nicene-creed"},{"_id":"7a33d23e7fa086f3dd0000c8","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11808625,"position":1,"parentId":"7a33e8687fa086f3dd000073","content":"As it was stated in Evangelical Theology, “If the Son were not God, he could neither reveal the Father nor atone for our sin. If the Spirit were not God, he could unite us neither to the Father and Son nor one another” (Bird, 2013). The Nicene Creed proclaims God from God, Light from Light, true God from true God, begotten, not made; of the same essence as the Father. Through him all things were made. It pretty much tells the story of John 1:1-4. It means that the father and the son has same qualities that match each other they are both of the same substance. He is not just one God in three divine Persons. These Persons also exist in relation to one another. "},{"_id":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a224","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11800248,"position":10,"parentId":null,"content":"Conclusion\n"},{"_id":"7a33997a7fa086f3dd0000fe","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11808626,"position":1,"parentId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a224","content":"I'm done"},{"_id":"7a3398047fa086f3dd0000ff","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11808637,"position":1,"parentId":"7a33997a7fa086f3dd0000fe","content":"In conclusion, it will be impossible to see the correlations with God the Father, God the son, and God the Holy Spirit if the person does not read the scriptures. The scriptures is where God reveals himself to the individual. Believing the Trinity is more of a faith-based decision. The truth is it will be impossible to exclude or downplay Jesus from the trinity. Reason why because Jesus is the reason for everything to be created. Moreover, the Holy Spirit is the life-giving god that gives life. God the father is the overseer and watches over all things. All three together consist in the Holy Trinity."},{"_id":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a225","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11800249,"position":11,"parentId":null,"content":""},{"_id":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a226","treeId":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","seq":11800250,"position":12,"parentId":null,"content":""}],"tree":{"_id":"5a2b485d5e65d4c664e7a217","name":"Trinitarian Theology 1","publicUrl":"trinitarian-theology-1","latex":true}}